Date   

Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Video including Dora assembly

Robert Duchesneau
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Rkm0JZiFK4

 

This 6-minute German newsreel is mainly about building the Atlantic Wall, featuring the 16-inch Batterie Lindemann and other installations. However, there is a fair amount of material on assembling Dora.  In German, no subtitles.

 

-Robert Duchesneau


Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

Nigel Attwood
 

The attached article on it confirms it is an 18” but not Boche Buster this one was a test gun at Shoeburyness which is why it survived.



Nigel Attwood



From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 31 March 2017 23:44
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: RE: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news





That’s the 18-inch “Boche Buster”, right?



-Robert Duchesneau





From: railwaygun@... <mailto:railwaygun@...> [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: Friday, March 31, 2017 2:30 PM
To: railwaygun@... <mailto:railwaygun@...>
Subject: RE: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news





The museum in Woolwich had a railgun outside, this moved to the new home in Larkhill Wiltshire a year or two ago where it was cosmetically restored and sent to the Dutch railway museum at Utrecht on loan for their WW2 display it should be back by now or very soon.



Nigel Attwood



From: railwaygun@... <mailto:railwaygun@...> [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 24 March 2017 07:26
To: railwaygun@... <mailto:railwaygun@...>
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news





I read a post on another military forum which reported that the Royal Artillery Archives were already closed, and would be (I think) for 3 years.



But this article refers to maintaining "controlled access". Here's hoping that their archives remain accessible.



Regards

Dawn



Sent from my iPhone


On 24 Mar 2017, at 04:18, druebsamen@... <mailto:druebsamen@...> [railwaygun] <railwaygun@... <mailto:railwaygun@...> > wrote:



The Fiepower Royal Artillery Museum is to leave London so reports the Museum Association



https://www.museumsassociation.org/museums-journal/news/01032016-firepower-museum-to-leave-london-home



I would assume that their is something in this museum of interest to this group. But I have never been there so do not know.



The shear number of military related museums dilutes the population that would support them thrrogh heir time and money.



David





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


WWII Little David US 36" mortar

philgils@...
 

US Army training film showing the 36" mortar, "Little David" being transported, emplaced, assembled and fired.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NoiO8z8mVc


text attached to comments portion of video



Published on Sep 2, 2015

A great historic video of the US Military mortar that is considered the largest and most powerful mortar that has ever been built. Little David was the nickname of an American 36 inches (910 mm) caliber mortar used for test firing aerial bombs during World War II, that is one of the largest calibre guns ever built, having a larger calibre than both of Germany's Dora and Gustav which were 31.5 inches (800 mm) railway guns. Great Britain's Mallet's Mortar had an identical calibre.

Type Heavy mortar
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service Testing only
Used by USA
Wars World War II
Specifications
Weight 40 tons (without carriage)
Barrel length 22 feet (6.7 m)
Shell 3,650 pounds (1,656 kg)
Caliber 36 inches (914 mm)
Barrels 1
Muzzle velocity 1250 ft/s (381 m/s)
Maximum firing range 6 miles (9.7 km)
Feed system Muzzle loading

History[edit]
The mortar was originally used as the launching mechanism for test-firing aerial bombs at Aberdeen Proving Ground (during the war, bombs became larger and larger necessitating the construction of such a large calibre gun). Little David was therefore not intended as a combat weapon. The mortar's base was a large steel box. The base was placed below ground, with its top flush with the surrounding surface, allowing the mortar's muzzle to be lowered horizontal for loading at ground level.[1]

By 1944, it was expected that the US forces would encounter extremely strong fortifications during the expected invasion of Japan. Studies began on using Little David as a siege mortar. The mortar was converted into a two piece mobile unit, consisting of the 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg) barrel and the 93,000 pounds (42,000 kg) base transported by two artillery tractors. In addition to the two main loads, the Little David unit would also include a bulldozer and crane with bucket to dig the emplacement for the mortar's base.[2]

The huge mortar could be ready to fire in 12 hours. The largest (800 mm) known German artillery weapons were hauled on 25 railway cars and required three weeks to put in firing position.[2]

Little David was one of the largest artillery pieces ever produced, by calibre, although Dora fired a heavier shell. Little David's overall effectiveness would have been questionable because of its limited range and accuracy. When Japan surrendered the invasion became unnecessary, and Little David (still in its trial phase) never saw combat.

Little David currently resides in the outdoor collection of armor and artillery pieces at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland.

Phil, Bkyn



BOOK

Raymond Lorts, Sr,
 

Hi Guy's; I got out library in Portland,Oergon. Model Railroader Layout design Planning.

Model Railroads go to WAR.

DOD  Railroad  Equipment;   Using    Commercial  Car's.

Oversized  equipment  and vehicles like  the M-1 Abrams  tanks and M-88

Recovery  vehicles  ,must be shipped on flatcars that are specially outfitted

ot accommodate Heavy loads.

Defense Freight Railway Interchange Fleet (DFRIF) ,also known by their

DODX  Reporting marks.

  The DFRIF CONSISTS primarily  of 140-ton,six-axle heavy rail flatcars

and the Army Strategic Mobility Program .



                                2015  DFRIF    Fleet

                             40000series  68',6-axle ,140-ton  flatcars
                                                        564

                        41000 series  68' ,4-axle 100-ton flatcars

                                                  256
                      42000 series   89' 4-axle 90-ton flatcar

                                              536

                      48000  series 89' ,4-axle ,75-ton flatcar

                                                   319

                                Special  purpose  car's      134

                                 Petroleum  tank car's      210

                                Chemical  tank car's                17

                             Miscellaneous   car's            47




                                Raymond Lorts   Sr


--
It might take me a bit of time to respond to you, but i will respond to you.  Thanks for your patience's.


File - Monthly memo

railwaygun@...
 

This is the group�s monthly reminder informing you that you are a member of the Railwaygun, Armoured Train and military railway Group at Yahoo! Groups.

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Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

Robert Duchesneau
 

That’s the 18-inch “Boche Buster”, right?

 

-Robert Duchesneau

 

 

From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: Friday, March 31, 2017 2:30 PM
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: RE: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

 

 

The museum in Woolwich had a railgun outside, this moved to the new home in Larkhill Wiltshire a year or two ago where it was cosmetically restored and sent to the Dutch railway museum at Utrecht on loan for their WW2 display it should be back by now or very soon.

 

Nigel Attwood

 

From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 24 March 2017 07:26
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

 

 

I read a post on another military forum which reported that the Royal Artillery Archives were already closed, and would be (I think) for 3 years.

 

But this article refers to maintaining "controlled access". Here's hoping that their archives remain accessible.

 

Regards

Dawn 

 

Sent from my iPhone


On 24 Mar 2017, at 04:18, druebsamen@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

The Fiepower Royal Artillery Museum is to leave London so reports the Museum Association

 

 

I would assume that their is something in this museum of interest to this group.  But I have never been there so do not know.

 

The shear number of military related museums dilutes the population that would support them thrrogh heir time and money.

 

David


Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

Nigel Attwood
 

The museum in Woolwich had a railgun outside, this moved to the new home in Larkhill Wiltshire a year or two ago where it was cosmetically restored and sent to the Dutch railway museum at Utrecht on loan for their WW2 display it should be back by now or very soon.

 

Nigel Attwood

 

From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 24 March 2017 07:26
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

 

 

I read a post on another military forum which reported that the Royal Artillery Archives were already closed, and would be (I think) for 3 years.

 

But this article refers to maintaining "controlled access". Here's hoping that their archives remain accessible.

 

Regards

Dawn 

 

Sent from my iPhone


On 24 Mar 2017, at 04:18, druebsamen@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

The Fiepower Royal Artillery Museum is to leave London so reports the Museum Association

 

 

I would assume that their is something in this museum of interest to this group.  But I have never been there so do not know.

 

The shear number of military related museums dilutes the population that would support them thrrogh heir time and money.

 

David


Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Re: Hitler’s Doomed Schwerer Gustav: Largest Gun Mankind Has Ever Built

fred oliver
 


From: "dsrc512@... [railwaygun]"
To: railwaygun@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:36 AM
Subject: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Re: Hitler’s Doomed Schwerer Gustav: Largest Gun Mankind Has Ever Built

 
Strange article, author can't seem to make up his mind whether Dora and Gustav were two different guns or just one.

Most readers of this forum are aware only Dora ever fired at enemy targets.  This occurred at Sevastopol on five days between June 5, 1942 and June 17, 1942 which used up all the available ammunition, 48 shots.  A test of five experimental high explosive shells occurred on June 25, 1942, some of which were purposely aimed at the Black Sea before the gun was dismantled for transport.

A site for targeting Leningrad was prepared, Dora was moved there and set up in August, 1942 but then dismantled without ever firing a shot due to Soviet advances and returned to the test site at Rugenwald in Pomerania.

In March 1943, Dora was displayed at Rugenwald to Hitler and the senior military command.  Two shots were fired after which the gun was again broken down in part due to it being a highly visible target from the air.     

Heavy Gustav, the second gun, was fully assembled and test shots were fired between Feb. 24 and Feb. 27, 1943 at Rugenwald. Tests included improved munitions.  Like Dora, Gustav was then broken down and parts distributed by rail both within the test site and in the nearby countryside.

A third gun, Long Gustav, with a smaller caliber but longer barrel, was destroyed by an Allied air raid on the Krupp plant at Essen.  Hitler had ordered the third gun constructed in mid-May, 1943.

This information comes from Gerhard Taube's book Deutsche Eisenbahn Geschutz published by Motor buch Verlag in 2001.  I bought my used copy on eBay and translated portions of it using Google translate.  I recommend the book as it also covers the "Paris gun(s)" of WW I  and German rail guns developed during the interwar period.  The book has quite a few close-up photos of the assembly of Dora and Gustav.

Alex Huff  
 



Re: Hitler’s Doomed Schwerer Gustav: Largest Gun Mankind Has Ever Built

Alex Huff
 

Strange article, author can't seem to make up his mind whether Dora and Gustav were two different guns or just one.

Most readers of this forum are aware only Dora ever fired at enemy targets.  This occurred at Sevastopol on five days between June 5, 1942 and June 17, 1942 which used up all the available ammunition, 48 shots.  A test of five experimental high explosive shells occurred on June 25, 1942, some of which were purposely aimed at the Black Sea before the gun was dismantled for transport.

A site for targeting Leningrad was prepared, Dora was moved there and set up in August, 1942 but then dismantled without ever firing a shot due to Soviet advances and returned to the test site at Rugenwald in Pomerania.

In March 1943, Dora was displayed at Rugenwald to Hitler and the senior military command.  Two shots were fired after which the gun was again broken down in part due to it being a highly visible target from the air.     

Heavy Gustav, the second gun, was fully assembled and test shots were fired between Feb. 24 and Feb. 27, 1943 at Rugenwald. Tests included improved munitions.  Like Dora, Gustav was then broken down and parts distributed by rail both within the test site and in the nearby countryside.

A third gun, Long Gustav, with a smaller caliber but longer barrel, was destroyed by an Allied air raid on the Krupp plant at Essen.  Hitler had ordered the third gun constructed in mid-May, 1943.

This information comes from Gerhard Taube's book Deutsche Eisenbahn Geschutz published by Motor buch Verlag in 2001.  I bought my used copy on eBay and translated portions of it using Google translate.  I recommend the book as it also covers the "Paris gun(s)" of WW I  and German rail guns developed during the interwar period.  The book has quite a few close-up photos of the assembly of Dora and Gustav.

Alex Huff  
 


Hitler’s Doomed Schwerer Gustav: Largest Gun Mankind Has Ever Built

AviationMetalSmith
 


Re: Video Of A British 12" Railway Howitzer In Action During WW1

philgils@...
 

A 21st century rail gun

VIDEO: U.S. Navy Tests ‘Star Wars’ Electromagnetic Rail Gun That Can Destroy Targets up to 125 Miles Away

http://www.breitbart.com/big- government/2017/03/23/video-u- s-navy-tests-star-wars- electromagnetic-rail-gun-can- destroy-targets-125-miles- away/?utm_source=facebook&utm_ medium=social


Phil, Bklyn


Video Of A British 12" Railway Howitzer In Action During WW1

Chris Henderson
 


WW1 Gallipoli/Lemnos Railways and WW2 Kiwi Railway Troops

Chris Henderson
 

Nigel,


You and others may find this video compilation of NZEF WW2 railway photo's on youtube interesting. May I also suggest having a look at the thread I started on Gallipoli and Lemnos railways/tramways at the Great War Forum.

The Narrow Gauge Railway Society has also recently had some very good articles about these WW1 railways and those in Egypt and Palestine in their last few issues of the "The Narrow Gauge" magazine.

Feel free to post to your WW2RSG sub-group from this message on a public domain board.

Cheers,

Chris



Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] artillery related news

dawn.pillans@btinternet.com
 

I read a post on another military forum which reported that the Royal Artillery Archives were already closed, and would be (I think) for 3 years.

But this article refers to maintaining "controlled access". Here's hoping that their archives remain accessible.

Regards

Dawn 

Sent from my iPhone

On 24 Mar 2017, at 04:18, druebsamen@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

The Fiepower Royal Artillery Museum is to leave London so reports the Museum Association


I would assume that their is something in this museum of interest to this group.  But I have never been there so do not know.

The shear number of military related museums dilutes the population that would support them thrrogh heir time and money.

 

David


artillery related news

David Ruebsamen
 

The Fiepower Royal Artillery Museum is to leave London so reports the Museum Association


I would assume that their is something in this museum of interest to this group.  But I have never been there so do not know.

The shear number of military related museums dilutes the population that would support them thrrogh heir time and money.

 

David


Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Messages being copied to other outlets

Nigel Attwood
 

Mr Mackinlay,

 

I am sorry that you feel so aggrieved over the matter below and I apologise for the upset it has caused.

 

The fact is that we have not published an article written by you, but repeated a message that you placed in the public domain advising readers to check out Brendon Judds “Desert Railway” book. In line with public domain etiquette we credited the source (i.e. you) and did not alter the text.

 

In the WW1RSG Bulletin we have been discussing railways at Mudros associated with the Gallipoli campaign with its strong ANZAC connections. Naturally the discussion spun off into the WW2RSG area due to the Aus and NZ railway activities in the Eastern Med. There was quite limited knowledge within the group about this so your finding a book on the subject has proved an invaluable pointer to further our knowledge.

 

I will contact the gentleman in Berlin as obviously he has some additional information that may benefit the group.

 

Nigel Attwood

Editor WW2RSG

 

From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 20 March 2017 10:30
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Messages being copied to other outlets

 

 

I received at the weekend a email from a gentleman in Berlin.

 

He querying a article that I put up on WW2RSG Bulletin.

 

This I had absolutely no idea as to what it was.  He responded to my query re it, telling that it is 'World War 2 Railway Study Group' - which has a bi-monthly Bulletin, in which my info had been printed.

 

Whilst I would have no problem if formally asked if any of my writings could be publishing in this Bulletin, I am concerned that messages are being posted onto it carte blanch.  With the group member so doing is somewhat rude!!!

 

Asking around, a chap who belongs to the Study Group stated that such messages have been put up for quite a number of years! 

 

I find it bad enough that one has to be careful about what one writes in case it offends some loon, but, to find that such is being placed onto a document which I know nothing about concerns me.

Yours,

MACKINLAY  New South Wales

PS.  The Paranoia of the internet in which we have to look over our shoulder!

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Messages being copied to other outlets

Gordon Angus Mackinlay
 

I received at the weekend a email from a gentleman in Berlin.
 
He querying a article that I put up on WW2RSG Bulletin.
 
This I had absolutely no idea as to what it was.  He responded to my query re it, telling that it is 'World War 2 Railway Study Group' - which has a bi-monthly Bulletin, in which my info had been printed.
 
Whilst I would have no problem if formally asked if any of my writings could be publishing in this Bulletin, I am concerned that messages are being posted onto it carte blanch.  With the group member so doing is somewhat rude!!!
 
Asking around, a chap who belongs to the Study Group stated that such messages have been put up for quite a number of years! 
 
I find it bad enough that one has to be careful about what one writes in case it offends some loon, but, to find that such is being placed onto a document which I know nothing about concerns me.
Yours,
MACKINLAY  New South Wales
PS.  The Paranoia of the internet in which we have to look over our shoulder!

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Armoured trains - HMSO Ebook

nicholas robinson
 

Description:

011800-Armoured Trains 58 Pages1905 Lecture delivered at the Royal Engineers Institute on 2nd November, 1905. Discusses the uses of armoured trains, the construction, equipment and garrisons of armoured trains, and the organization and administration of armoured trains, THIS ITEM IS SOLD AS A DIGITAL DOWNLOAD ONLY. AFTER PURCHASE YOU WILL BE FURNISHED A LINK FOR DOWNLOAD BY EMAIL. Bookseller Inventory # 011800



https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=16274271052&searchurl=tn%3Darmoured%2Btrains%26sortby%3D17


Also perhaps from HMSO??


Armoured trains in Mesopotamia (WW1) and the Balkan wars

nicholas robinson
 


Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Railway battery in the War of the Triple Alliance.

Peter Ellis
 

On 03/03/2017 17:19, Renaud (Ron) OLGIATI @rolgiati [railwaygun] wrote:
I read in Sir Richard F. Burton's "Letters from the battlefields of Paraguay":
Never noticed that he'd been in Paraguay in the list of his publications. He was the Consul here in Trieste towards the end of his life.
Cheers

--
Peter Ellis

Porec Sales Office
Croatia Property Services

Selling in the new Tuscany!

Tel +385 (0) 91 400 3784

peter.ellis@...
info@...

http://www.croatiapropertyservices.com
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