Date   
Stem cell therapies

Christophe
 

Nelson, I would be interested in learning more which stem cell therapies in use or planned would benefit long term HIV survivors. Many thanks.

How to stop receiving so many emails from pozhealth #groupinstructions

Nelson Vergel
 

Change your subscription to DIGEST or DAILY SUMMARY by clicking here


--
All the best,

Nelson Vergel, BsChE, MBA
Founder

Affordable Blood Tests. Most US Cities. Prescription Provided.


The Smart Man's Potency and Performance Forum.

A 501 c 3 Non-Profit Organization.

Physician Training Platform

Re: NATAP/IAC: Aging/Comorbidities Report/"The Silent Majority":aging older HIV+ ignored #aging

Jules Levin
 

Not true, despite suppressed viremia and good cd4 heart disease and kidney disease are much greater in aging HIV+


On Aug 15, 2018, at 7:17 PM, Liz Highleyman <liz@...> wrote:

Or maybe work more extensively with HIV-negative groups facing cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, diabetes, etc. That gives a much bigger population and much more leverage for pressuring pharma, researchers, and funders. For those with well-controlled HIV, most of the issues will be similar, though they may occur earlier.

-Liz

On 8/15/18 3:45 PM, Theo Smart via Groups.Io wrote:
I agree with Jules that we have to launch a movement in the US (North America?) to better address the more complex health needs of the HIV+50+. 

Other than perhaps than addressing high blood pressure and (some) docs prescribing statins, most of the clinic-based care that people receive— especially those of us dependent upon Medicaid and Medicare — is a simplified ‘here are your ARVs, now go be undetectable’ package that will lead to more and more of us falling through the cracks as we age.

I think the weight of the evidence that Jules puts out can at times be overwhelming, but the message is clear: we need to reorient care to better address our needs.

And since ~50% of us ARE now HIV+50+, surely we’ve reached a point of critical mass. The only question is how best to leverage it — how to shame our community-based institutions to take action, or, if need be, establish institutions that better represent us.

On Aug 15, 2018, at 9:43 AM, Jules Levin via Groups.Io <julev@...> wrote:


www.natap.org

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

The New Silent Majority - Aging Older HIV+ 
- the inequity, ageism & undignified treatment of older aging HIV+ many of whom need much more attention then they get now from US based advocates or federal & local officials, they need RWCA funded services, extended visitations with doctors, better care coordination, the needs will only increase as the entire HIV+ population in the US emphatically is aging, yet US advocates & officials persist in ignoring the problem despite clearly knowing of this problem. Our 1st surviving elderly generation deserves more than they get. Its stigmatized ageism among our own, just like in the general society. Large US agencies/AIDS Service Organizations in major large US cities & policy groups based in Wash DC have not done anything to influence the federal government or local officials to address these needs, on a local basis their programs if they have any for this group are not effective. There is no excuse - ageism, stigma, its as if they are all just waiting for older aging HIV to die off as they focus only on prevention and other issues, but essentially ignore the serious plight of the aging. These large city AIDS groups and policy groups do not understand the impact of aging in HIV+ but there is no excuse because they have ignored all the signs and information. I refer to US based organizations because in Europe the community has formed an aging coalition & they have been holding meetings across Europe and trying to influence government officials, the EATG and many advocates in Europe are leading this movement but there is NOTHING in the USA, its ignored.

from Jules: studies reported at IAC reinforce what we knew - the changed HIV epidemic to an older fading older population of people increasingly contracting more & more comorbidities and increasing rates & worsening frailty and disability, loss of daily independent functioning for many, and in the face of this most advocates in the USA, policy advocates & federal & local officials ignore that 1 - we need to better address this “new HIV Epidemic”, 2 - we need special support services for those aging who need them & their clinics & clinicians, 3- we need more education for clinicians regarding prevention & care & treatment for key comorbid diseases including heart disease, brain, neurologic & cognitive impairment including depression, social isolation & homebound, 4- we need broader & expanded research including more patient focused research. NIAID priorities list aging/comorbidities in the top 5 but this is a fake herring, in reality NIAID & OAR has made it clear to researchers funding is severely limited in this field, many study funding requests are denied. Requests to begin addressing these problems to NIAID, HHS & OAR are ignored. Long term care & living plans are not even discussed: with increasing disability there will be a need for housing & institutionalizing those who are unable to care for themselves at home. Integral to the HIV epidemic is a population who are often living alone - having lost friends and family and unlike the HIV-negative general population who much mire often have family and children to assist in care as they age - HIV+ do not have this.

What you find at IAC was many aging & coorbidity studies reporting not surprising but expected results: 
1. depression, anxiety & insomnia is 3-7 times higher among aging older HIV+
2. heart disease in the HIV HEART study reports up to 75% increased risk for heart failure in HIV+ but similar results have been reported in many other studies in recent years. Cardiovascular disease & MI/stroke rates are much greater among HIV+, as HIV+ age the slope of increase for risk is much greater.
3. again not surprising 2 frailty studies from the AGEhiv study in the Netherlands reported frailty strongly is associated with increased premature death in HIV+ - not surprising & previously reported. Of note the prevalence rates of frailty were very high over 50% no matter what the age group with pre-frailty or full frailty, for >65 year olds rate of pre-frailty or full frailty was almost 80%. for 45 year olds the rate was still 50%. The mortality risk increased from close to zero to around 15% for those fully frail but only several percentage points for the in pre-frailty. The hard ratio however was greater than 10 fi=old increased death risk among frail. Frailty & having comorbidities was related, and these too increase mortality risk, and frailty remained independently associated with developing comorbidities.
4. a Brazil  study reported 2 fold increased risk for fatty liver among HIV+ who do not have HCV or HBV.Its called non viral hepatitis fatty liver & steatosis & NASH. HIV+ are at greater risk for fatty liver as we have all the risk factors diabetes, heart disease, lipid abnormalities, a history of ARTs that increase risk for fatty liver, hypertension. metabolic abnormalities, inflammation. Thsi disease has recently got much more attention with discussions & studies in HIV at CROI & other conferences, see link below to history of these studies and background. Its estimated NASH will one day be the greatest cause for liver transplantation.
5. I’d like to bring your attention to study below reporting ART interruptions in kids caused brain damage, although the study is in kids who are different than adults its related to taking interruptions and the risks. Several published studies find ART interruptions increase risk for long term brain or CNS damage, so are ATI interruptions however brief in cure studies safe, we don’t know for sure but what we know so far suggests yes.
5. COMORBIDITY & MORTALITY Studies - 2 listed below report doubling of older >60 HIV+ at clinic in last 7 years along with much greater prevalence of kidney disease, boned disease, having 3 or more comorbidities. The 2nd study also from Lonod reported 77% of deaths were due to comorbidities among HIV+. Many comorbid condition are listed in this study, of note from hypertension to liver decompensation & diabetes. AIDS was as a cause of death from 15% to 25% of deaths.

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

NEW - IAC Reports











IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017: proportion over 60 doubled since 2010; chronic kidney disease doubled in this time from 15% to 30%; bone disease rates increased from 21% to 37%; having 3 or more comorbidities rate increased from 22% to 31%, although ischemic heart disease decreased from 17% to 9%. Polypharmacy for non-HIV drugs of course also increased from an average of 4 to 6 drugs.









IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017
















_______________________________________________
NATAP nataphcvhiv mailing list -- nataphcvhiv@...

This is an annoucement-only mailing list.  Do not reply.

To unsubscribe: send a blank email to nataphcvhiv-request@... with a subject of unsubscribe.


For more information, see https://pairlist7.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/nataphcvhiv

_______________________________________________



-- 
Liz Highleyman
Medical journalist
liz@...
+1-415-305-0821

Re: NATAP/IAC: Aging/Comorbidities Report/"The Silent Majority":aging older HIV+ ignored #aging

Theo Smart
 

I think Liz was saying just that… that we should work with the HIV-negative comorbodity groups who are having the same issues that we are seeing earlier, despite well controlled HIV.

On Aug 16, 2018, at 10:40 AM, Jules Levin via Groups.Io <julev@...> wrote:

Not true, despite suppressed viremia and good cd4 heart disease and kidney disease are much greater in aging HIV+


On Aug 15, 2018, at 7:17 PM, Liz Highleyman <liz@...> wrote:

Or maybe work more extensively with HIV-negative groups facing cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, diabetes, etc. That gives a much bigger population and much more leverage for pressuring pharma, researchers, and funders. For those with well-controlled HIV, most of the issues will be similar, though they may occur earlier.

-Liz

On 8/15/18 3:45 PM, Theo Smart via Groups.Io wrote:
I agree with Jules that we have to launch a movement in the US (North America?) to better address the more complex health needs of the HIV+50+. 

Other than perhaps than addressing high blood pressure and (some) docs prescribing statins, most of the clinic-based care that people receive— especially those of us dependent upon Medicaid and Medicare — is a simplified ‘here are your ARVs, now go be undetectable’ package that will lead to more and more of us falling through the cracks as we age.

I think the weight of the evidence that Jules puts out can at times be overwhelming, but the message is clear: we need to reorient care to better address our needs.

And since ~50% of us ARE now HIV+50+, surely we’ve reached a point of critical mass. The only question is how best to leverage it — how to shame our community-based institutions to take action, or, if need be, establish institutions that better represent us.

On Aug 15, 2018, at 9:43 AM, Jules Levin via Groups.Io <julev@...> wrote:


www.natap.org

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

The New Silent Majority - Aging Older HIV+ 
- the inequity, ageism & undignified treatment of older aging HIV+ many of whom need much more attention then they get now from US based advocates or federal & local officials, they need RWCA funded services, extended visitations with doctors, better care coordination, the needs will only increase as the entire HIV+ population in the US emphatically is aging, yet US advocates & officials persist in ignoring the problem despite clearly knowing of this problem. Our 1st surviving elderly generation deserves more than they get. Its stigmatized ageism among our own, just like in the general society. Large US agencies/AIDS Service Organizations in major large US cities & policy groups based in Wash DC have not done anything to influence the federal government or local officials to address these needs, on a local basis their programs if they have any for this group are not effective. There is no excuse - ageism, stigma, its as if they are all just waiting for older aging HIV to die off as they focus only on prevention and other issues, but essentially ignore the serious plight of the aging. These large city AIDS groups and policy groups do not understand the impact of aging in HIV+ but there is no excuse because they have ignored all the signs and information. I refer to US based organizations because in Europe the community has formed an aging coalition & they have been holding meetings across Europe and trying to influence government officials, the EATG and many advocates in Europe are leading this movement but there is NOTHING in the USA, its ignored.

from Jules: studies reported at IAC reinforce what we knew - the changed HIV epidemic to an older fading older population of people increasingly contracting more & more comorbidities and increasing rates & worsening frailty and disability, loss of daily independent functioning for many, and in the face of this most advocates in the USA, policy advocates & federal & local officials ignore that 1 - we need to better address this “new HIV Epidemic”, 2 - we need special support services for those aging who need them & their clinics & clinicians, 3- we need more education for clinicians regarding prevention & care & treatment for key comorbid diseases including heart disease, brain, neurologic & cognitive impairment including depression, social isolation & homebound, 4- we need broader & expanded research including more patient focused research. NIAID priorities list aging/comorbidities in the top 5 but this is a fake herring, in reality NIAID & OAR has made it clear to researchers funding is severely limited in this field, many study funding requests are denied. Requests to begin addressing these problems to NIAID, HHS & OAR are ignored. Long term care & living plans are not even discussed: with increasing disability there will be a need for housing & institutionalizing those who are unable to care for themselves at home. Integral to the HIV epidemic is a population who are often living alone - having lost friends and family and unlike the HIV-negative general population who much mire often have family and children to assist in care as they age - HIV+ do not have this.

What you find at IAC was many aging & coorbidity studies reporting not surprising but expected results: 
1. depression, anxiety & insomnia is 3-7 times higher among aging older HIV+
2. heart disease in the HIV HEART study reports up to 75% increased risk for heart failure in HIV+ but similar results have been reported in many other studies in recent years. Cardiovascular disease & MI/stroke rates are much greater among HIV+, as HIV+ age the slope of increase for risk is much greater.
3. again not surprising 2 frailty studies from the AGEhiv study in the Netherlands reported frailty strongly is associated with increased premature death in HIV+ - not surprising & previously reported. Of note the prevalence rates of frailty were very high over 50% no matter what the age group with pre-frailty or full frailty, for >65 year olds rate of pre-frailty or full frailty was almost 80%. for 45 year olds the rate was still 50%. The mortality risk increased from close to zero to around 15% for those fully frail but only several percentage points for the in pre-frailty. The hard ratio however was greater than 10 fi=old increased death risk among frail. Frailty & having comorbidities was related, and these too increase mortality risk, and frailty remained independently associated with developing comorbidities.
4. a Brazil  study reported 2 fold increased risk for fatty liver among HIV+ who do not have HCV or HBV.Its called non viral hepatitis fatty liver & steatosis & NASH. HIV+ are at greater risk for fatty liver as we have all the risk factors diabetes, heart disease, lipid abnormalities, a history of ARTs that increase risk for fatty liver, hypertension. metabolic abnormalities, inflammation. Thsi disease has recently got much more attention with discussions & studies in HIV at CROI & other conferences, see link below to history of these studies and background. Its estimated NASH will one day be the greatest cause for liver transplantation.
5. I’d like to bring your attention to study below reporting ART interruptions in kids caused brain damage, although the study is in kids who are different than adults its related to taking interruptions and the risks. Several published studies find ART interruptions increase risk for long term brain or CNS damage, so are ATI interruptions however brief in cure studies safe, we don’t know for sure but what we know so far suggests yes.
5. COMORBIDITY & MORTALITY Studies - 2 listed below report doubling of older >60 HIV+ at clinic in last 7 years along with much greater prevalence of kidney disease, boned disease, having 3 or more comorbidities. The 2nd study also from Lonod reported 77% of deaths were due to comorbidities among HIV+. Many comorbid condition are listed in this study, of note from hypertension to liver decompensation & diabetes. AIDS was as a cause of death from 15% to 25% of deaths.

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

NEW - IAC Reports











IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017: proportion over 60 doubled since 2010; chronic kidney disease doubled in this time from 15% to 30%; bone disease rates increased from 21% to 37%; having 3 or more comorbidities rate increased from 22% to 31%, although ischemic heart disease decreased from 17% to 9%. Polypharmacy for non-HIV drugs of course also increased from an average of 4 to 6 drugs.









IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017
















_______________________________________________
NATAP nataphcvhiv mailing list -- nataphcvhiv@...

This is an annoucement-only mailing list.  Do not reply.

To unsubscribe: send a blank email to nataphcvhiv-request@... with a subject of unsubscribe.


For more information, see https://pairlist7.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/nataphcvhiv

_______________________________________________



-- 
Liz Highleyman
Medical journalist
liz@...
+1-415-305-0821

How to stop receiving so many emails from pozhealth #groupinstructions

Nelson Vergel
 

Some people have emailed me this question. It's easy to change your settings.

Change your subscription to DIGEST or DAILY SUMMARY by clicking here
 
https://groups.io/g/pozhealth/editsub

Thanks for being part of our group!

In health, 
Nelson

Re: NATAP/IAC: Aging/Comorbidities Report/"The Silent Majority":aging older HIV+ ignored #aging

Jules Levin
 

Ok good idea but these are separate points and I agree, yet still services for aging older who need them should be provided now. Future potential therapies like stem cells or others are a possibility and in the future. 


On Aug 16, 2018, at 10:51 AM, Theo Smart via Groups.Io <theosmart@...> wrote:

I think Liz was saying just that… that we should work with the HIV-negative comorbodity groups who are having the same issues that we are seeing earlier, despite well controlled HIV.

On Aug 16, 2018, at 10:40 AM, Jules Levin via Groups.Io <julev@...> wrote:

Not true, despite suppressed viremia and good cd4 heart disease and kidney disease are much greater in aging HIV+


On Aug 15, 2018, at 7:17 PM, Liz Highleyman <liz@...> wrote:

Or maybe work more extensively with HIV-negative groups facing cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, diabetes, etc. That gives a much bigger population and much more leverage for pressuring pharma, researchers, and funders. For those with well-controlled HIV, most of the issues will be similar, though they may occur earlier.

-Liz

On 8/15/18 3:45 PM, Theo Smart via Groups.Io wrote:
I agree with Jules that we have to launch a movement in the US (North America?) to better address the more complex health needs of the HIV+50+. 

Other than perhaps than addressing high blood pressure and (some) docs prescribing statins, most of the clinic-based care that people receive— especially those of us dependent upon Medicaid and Medicare — is a simplified ‘here are your ARVs, now go be undetectable’ package that will lead to more and more of us falling through the cracks as we age.

I think the weight of the evidence that Jules puts out can at times be overwhelming, but the message is clear: we need to reorient care to better address our needs.

And since ~50% of us ARE now HIV+50+, surely we’ve reached a point of critical mass. The only question is how best to leverage it — how to shame our community-based institutions to take action, or, if need be, establish institutions that better represent us.

On Aug 15, 2018, at 9:43 AM, Jules Levin via Groups.Io <julev@...> wrote:


www.natap.org

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

The New Silent Majority - Aging Older HIV+ 
- the inequity, ageism & undignified treatment of older aging HIV+ many of whom need much more attention then they get now from US based advocates or federal & local officials, they need RWCA funded services, extended visitations with doctors, better care coordination, the needs will only increase as the entire HIV+ population in the US emphatically is aging, yet US advocates & officials persist in ignoring the problem despite clearly knowing of this problem. Our 1st surviving elderly generation deserves more than they get. Its stigmatized ageism among our own, just like in the general society. Large US agencies/AIDS Service Organizations in major large US cities & policy groups based in Wash DC have not done anything to influence the federal government or local officials to address these needs, on a local basis their programs if they have any for this group are not effective. There is no excuse - ageism, stigma, its as if they are all just waiting for older aging HIV to die off as they focus only on prevention and other issues, but essentially ignore the serious plight of the aging. These large city AIDS groups and policy groups do not understand the impact of aging in HIV+ but there is no excuse because they have ignored all the signs and information. I refer to US based organizations because in Europe the community has formed an aging coalition & they have been holding meetings across Europe and trying to influence government officials, the EATG and many advocates in Europe are leading this movement but there is NOTHING in the USA, its ignored.

from Jules: studies reported at IAC reinforce what we knew - the changed HIV epidemic to an older fading older population of people increasingly contracting more & more comorbidities and increasing rates & worsening frailty and disability, loss of daily independent functioning for many, and in the face of this most advocates in the USA, policy advocates & federal & local officials ignore that 1 - we need to better address this “new HIV Epidemic”, 2 - we need special support services for those aging who need them & their clinics & clinicians, 3- we need more education for clinicians regarding prevention & care & treatment for key comorbid diseases including heart disease, brain, neurologic & cognitive impairment including depression, social isolation & homebound, 4- we need broader & expanded research including more patient focused research. NIAID priorities list aging/comorbidities in the top 5 but this is a fake herring, in reality NIAID & OAR has made it clear to researchers funding is severely limited in this field, many study funding requests are denied. Requests to begin addressing these problems to NIAID, HHS & OAR are ignored. Long term care & living plans are not even discussed: with increasing disability there will be a need for housing & institutionalizing those who are unable to care for themselves at home. Integral to the HIV epidemic is a population who are often living alone - having lost friends and family and unlike the HIV-negative general population who much mire often have family and children to assist in care as they age - HIV+ do not have this.

What you find at IAC was many aging & coorbidity studies reporting not surprising but expected results: 
1. depression, anxiety & insomnia is 3-7 times higher among aging older HIV+
2. heart disease in the HIV HEART study reports up to 75% increased risk for heart failure in HIV+ but similar results have been reported in many other studies in recent years. Cardiovascular disease & MI/stroke rates are much greater among HIV+, as HIV+ age the slope of increase for risk is much greater.
3. again not surprising 2 frailty studies from the AGEhiv study in the Netherlands reported frailty strongly is associated with increased premature death in HIV+ - not surprising & previously reported. Of note the prevalence rates of frailty were very high over 50% no matter what the age group with pre-frailty or full frailty, for >65 year olds rate of pre-frailty or full frailty was almost 80%. for 45 year olds the rate was still 50%. The mortality risk increased from close to zero to around 15% for those fully frail but only several percentage points for the in pre-frailty. The hard ratio however was greater than 10 fi=old increased death risk among frail. Frailty & having comorbidities was related, and these too increase mortality risk, and frailty remained independently associated with developing comorbidities.
4. a Brazil  study reported 2 fold increased risk for fatty liver among HIV+ who do not have HCV or HBV.Its called non viral hepatitis fatty liver & steatosis & NASH. HIV+ are at greater risk for fatty liver as we have all the risk factors diabetes, heart disease, lipid abnormalities, a history of ARTs that increase risk for fatty liver, hypertension. metabolic abnormalities, inflammation. Thsi disease has recently got much more attention with discussions & studies in HIV at CROI & other conferences, see link below to history of these studies and background. Its estimated NASH will one day be the greatest cause for liver transplantation.
5. I’d like to bring your attention to study below reporting ART interruptions in kids caused brain damage, although the study is in kids who are different than adults its related to taking interruptions and the risks. Several published studies find ART interruptions increase risk for long term brain or CNS damage, so are ATI interruptions however brief in cure studies safe, we don’t know for sure but what we know so far suggests yes.
5. COMORBIDITY & MORTALITY Studies - 2 listed below report doubling of older >60 HIV+ at clinic in last 7 years along with much greater prevalence of kidney disease, boned disease, having 3 or more comorbidities. The 2nd study also from Lonod reported 77% of deaths were due to comorbidities among HIV+. Many comorbid condition are listed in this study, of note from hypertension to liver decompensation & diabetes. AIDS was as a cause of death from 15% to 25% of deaths.

IAC- Aging / Comorbidities / Fatty Liver / Kidney & Heart Diseases / Mortality in HIV+ Women & Men

NEW - IAC Reports











IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017: proportion over 60 doubled since 2010; chronic kidney disease doubled in this time from 15% to 30%; bone disease rates increased from 21% to 37%; having 3 or more comorbidities rate increased from 22% to 31%, although ischemic heart disease decreased from 17% to 9%. Polypharmacy for non-HIV drugs of course also increased from an average of 4 to 6 drugs.









IAC: Beyond the 60s: Changing co-morbidities in people living with HIV aged over 60 attending clinic in 2010 and 2017 - (07/25/18) - this analysis is to characterize and compare the prevalence of comorbidities in PLHIV aged over 60 attending a London clinic from 2910-2017
















_______________________________________________
NATAP nataphcvhiv mailing list -- nataphcvhiv@...

This is an annoucement-only mailing list.  Do not reply.

To unsubscribe: send a blank email to nataphcvhiv-request@... with a subject of unsubscribe.


For more information, see https://pairlist7.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/nataphcvhiv

_______________________________________________



-- 
Liz Highleyman
Medical journalist
liz@...
+1-415-305-0821

Re: POZ 100 Nomination Form - POZ

Dom
 

Sorry but I feel like it’s almost half assed how certain organizations and people are going about fighting this disease. And what about me and everybody like me who don’t get any kind of recognition for living with this horrid disease for the last quarter of a century? To me it’s all so self-serving. I haven’t heard any good news in the last 10 years.

On Aug 16, 2018, at 10:17 AM, Matt Sharp <mattsharpster@...> wrote:

I see your point but you missed the point entirely. These POZ Top100 lists are meant to recognize PEOPLE WITH HIV/AIDS not the disease itself.

And while the search for a cure continues why not recognize and empower those fighting HIV until a cure comes? They deserve recognition as people who have struggled, are leaders, and some never get thanked for their life work helping their peers infected with HIV.

Matt
On Aug 16, 2018, at 7:41 AM, Dom via Groups.Io <sportynyc76=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Can we please just find a cure and be done with all of this glorification of a disease that is wretched.?
I am so over it.
On Aug 16, 2018, at 8:41 AM, Nelson Vergel <@nelsonvergel> wrote:


https://www.poz.com/iframe/poz-100-nomination-form


Regards,

Nelson Vergel
Founder
DiscountedLabs.com
ClinicOptimizers.com
ExcelMale.com
PowerUSA.org





PoWeRUSA - Program for Wellness Restoration- PoWeR added 2 new photos. #facebook

pozhealth@groups.io Integration <pozhealth@...>
 

NATAP/IAC: Prevention/PrEP Report-Jared Baeten MD/Connie Celum MD

Jules Levin
 


www.natap.org

IAC: HIV Prevention at AIDS 2018 - Jared Baeten, MD PhD Connie Celum, MD MPH University of Washington - (08/15/18)


PrEP & Prevention











_______________________________________________
NATAP nataphcvhiv mailing list -- nataphcvhiv@...

This is an annoucement-only mailing list.  Do not reply.

To unsubscribe: send a blank email to nataphcvhiv-request@... with a subject of unsubscribe.


For more information, see https://pairlist7.pair.net/mailman/listinfo/nataphcvhiv

_______________________________________________

65-Year-Old HIV Hero Competes in Gay Games - TheBody.com

Nelson Vergel
 

65-Year-Old HIV Hero Competes in Gay Games

At Gay Games Village with Federation of Gay Games co-president Joanie Evans, honorary chair Brent Nicholson Earle, and Stephen Kovacev

At Gay Games Village with Federation of Gay Games co-president Joanie Evans, honorary chair Brent Nicholson Earle, and Stephen Kovacev (Credit: Rick Kemmerer)

It's been said that the word "hero" is not a noun, but a verb. "Hero" requires action.

Stephen Kovacev certainly falls into that active definition. He's a 65-year-old, HIV-positive athlete and cancer survivor competing in the quadrennial Gay Games in Paris. The hometown boy is representing Provincetown, Massachusetts, in his eighth Gay Games, running in the marathon. Kovacev has competed in every Gay Games since 1990, competing as a runner and body builder.

A lifelong athlete, Stephen had suspicions that he might have HIV back in 1989, shortly before running his first marathon in Boston. He was diagnosed with HIV before attending his first Gay Games in Vancouver.

"I was HIV positive, and I was in my first Gay Games in 1990," Kovacev told me in a recent phone conversation from Paris. "I barely got to them because my partner [at the time] was so sick. Kevin was the love of my life, and he was diagnosed that winter. I didn't work because I was taking care of him. I couldn't get any training in, but I was young. My partner died shortly after those Games. He died on World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, 1990, just a few months after I came back from the Games."

He remembers that time, in the middle of the AIDS epidemic, wondering how the Gay Games would continue. "How could they survive? How could any of us survive? I wondered the same thing at the Games in '94 in New York, how could this go on? But we did survive, and the Games have gone on."

Stephen continued to train and compete as an athlete despite his HIV status. After nearly dying of AIDS, he was devastated and spiritually bankrupt. He had friends who encouraged him to try alternative medications and faith in nature. "I lost the will to live," he said. "I was tired of fighting for my rights all my life, tired of seeing the atrocities. Sick of fighting to be well."

He spent all the money he had on alternative medications. "This was before the AIDS medications came out," Stephen said. "I had zero T cells and was deathly ill."

A friend asked why he wanted to live. "I didn't know how to answer her, because I was so sick. I couldn't walk, I was so sick from AIDS." Then an answer came to him. "I told her, this might sound crazy, but I want to run another marathon."

Stephen did recover and in 1997 became the first AIDS survivor to run the Boston Marathon. That same year, he was part of the all HIV/AIDS crew of Survivor in the 1997 TransPac, a biennial boat race from Los Angeles to Honolulu.

Stephen is grateful for the alternative treatments he used before the HIV medications came out. "They kept me alive, but when the medications came out, it was like, 'Oh, wow! These really work!'"

As an active athlete, Stephen has been very aware of the challenges brought on by HIV/AIDS. Last year, he received another challenge, a cancer diagnosis. "I had [human papillomavirus] (HPV) throat cancer. I had radiation every day, chemo. Fortunately, I responded to the treatment in such a way as to now be considered cancer free." He continued: "And my partner, Rick, he's fantastic. I couldn't have gotten through cancer without him."

Stephen is back at the Gay Games, disproving stereotypes of what someone living and ageing with HIV looks like. "I'm just hoping to make it to the finish line! I'm older now, and I have to accept that [the other runners] blow by me." He said with a chuckle: "It's my turn to be left behind. But it's OK. Life is about ego; it's about dropping your ego. That's fine. It their turn; my turn's past. But I'm still in the game."

"I find myself the oldest survivor of AIDS running marathons today," he said. "As the Olympic Games remember and honor the great athletes of the past, so I also remember and celebrate all those who fell on the battlefield of AIDS." Stephen credits his family and friends for all their support, and thanks his sponsor for the Games, Jay Anderson.

"It's pretty miraculous that I'm still here," Stephen said, "but life is miraculous."

The Gay Games take place in Paris Aug. 4-12, 2018.

Charles Sanchez is an openly gay, openly poz writer/director/actor living in New York City. He has written for WritingRaw.com and HuffPost's Queer Voices. As a performer, musical director, and director, he has worked in venues ranging from Lincoln Center and off-Broadway to dinner theater in Arkansas. His award-winning musical comedy web series, Merce, is about an HIV-positive guy living in New York who isn't sad, sick, or dying.



Pilot Study Finds Intense Exercise Is Good for Older HIV-Positive Men - TheBody.com #exercise

Nelson Vergel
 

6 drop outs from 22

Pilot Study Finds Intense Exercise Is Good for Older HIV-Positive Men

On average, HIV-positive adults appear to be at increased risk for aging-related complications. One potential strategy to reduce this risk is to engage in regular exercise. However, such a strategy has not been tested in older HIV-positive people.

Researchers at the University of Maryland in the U.S. conducted a randomized pilot study of high-intensity vs. moderate-intensity exercise in 22 older HIV-positive men. The exercise was done under supervision at the same athletic facility three times weekly for 16 consecutive weeks. All participants were relatively healthy and taking HIV treatment (ART).

The body's ability to maximize its use of oxygen is called V02 max for short. Sports exercise specialists generally consider V02 max to be a good indicator of cardiovascular fitness.

In the study, the men who engaged in high-intensity aerobic exercise (but not moderate intensity) showed a significantly increased V02 max. Also, the endurance of all the men increased, more so those who underwent intensive exercise. The improved ability of the men to use oxygen may have clinical implications, discussed later in this report.

As the study was small, conclusions affecting the average HIV-positive person in the community cannot be drawn from it. However, the results pave the way for a larger study of exercise in HIV-positive people, looking at its many benefits, particularly in older people. The results of a larger study can be generalized to more HIV-positive people.

Study Details

Researchers enrolled relatively healthy volunteers who did not have any of the following health issues:

  • higher-than-normal blood pressure (hypertension) that was untreated
  • heart pain
  • anemia

Eleven participants were assigned to each of the study interventions.

The average profile of participants was as follows:

  • age -- 57 years
  • CD4+ count -- 475 cells/mm3
  • undetectable viral load -- 94%
  • at least one-third of participants had co-existing conditions, such as treated hypertension, type 2 diabetes and hepatitis C virus infection (one-third of participants also had a history of injecting street drugs)
  • 75% of participants smoked

Monitoring

Participants underwent extensive monitoring during the study, particularly when exercising, including heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production.

Participants who engaged in high-intensity exercise did so on a treadmill. If they encountered joint pain, they had the option of doing their exercise on an elliptical machine, which has a low impact on joints. Participants who did moderate-intensity exercise walked around a standard running/walking track.

At first, participants underwent exercise training for between 20 and 30 minutes; this was gradually increased by about 10% each week. Toward the end of the study, participants were exercising for about 40 minutes per session.

Participants also received dietary counselling so that their weight remained stable during the study.

Results -- At the End of the Study

In the men who did high-intensity exercise, the following changes were found:

  • the ability of the body's muscles to use oxygen increased significantly
  • endurance increased by 27%
  • levels of HDL-C (so called "good cholesterol") increased significantly

Among the men who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise, the following changes were noted:

  • no significant increase in the ability of the body's muscles to use oxygen occurred
  • endurance increased by 11%
  • levels of HDL-C fell modestly

Dropouts

Six participants (four doing moderate-intensity exercise and two doing high-intensity exercise) prematurely left the study for the following reasons:

  • osteoarthritis -- two people
  • stroke -- one person
  • communication ceased with the study clinic -- three people

Bear in Mind

This was a pilot study, so its results are not broadly generalizable. However, it is a good first step and provides a rationale for a larger and possibly longer study on exercise in HIV-positive men.

The researchers found an increase in VO2 max in participants who underwent high-intensity exercise. They stated that "in the general geriatric population" an increase of similar magnitude over a decade is associated with the following:

  • 15% reduced risk of dying from all causes
  • 19% reduced risk of dying from complications of cardiovascular disease

However, the present study cannot draw firm conclusions about the health benefits of exercise in older HIV-positive people because it is too small. A larger, longer study is needed for such a purpose.

Other studies have found that HIV-positive people have increased levels of inflammation. This is partially reduced by initiating ART and maintaining an undetectable viral load. However, residual inflammation remains and some researchers are concerned that this heightened inflammation may make some HIV-positive people more susceptible to a range of chronic conditions, including inflammatory disorders. A longer study of high- vs. low-intensity exercise in HIV-positive people could explore the impact of exercise on the following issues:

  • inflammation
  • mood
  • blood sugar
  • lipid levels in the blood
  • cognitive functioning
  • health-related quality of life

CATIE Resources

Exploring HIV and inflammation -- TreatmentUpdate 223

Exercise -- Potential impact on inflammation and mood -- TreatmentUpdate 205

Healthy Living -- A practical guide to a healthy body for people living with HIV

References

  1. Oursler KK, Sorkin JD, Ryan AS, et al. A pilot randomized aerobic exercise trial in older HIV-infected men: Insights into strategies for successful aging with HIV. PLoS One. 2018 Jun 12;13(6):e0198855.
  2. Quigley A, O'Brien K, Parker R, et al. Exercise and cognitive function in people living with HIV: a scoping review. Disability and Rehabilitation. 2018 Jan 29:1-12.

[Note from TheBody: This article was originally published by CATIE in Aug. 2018. We have cross-posted it with their permission.]



Key Principles and Recommended Regimens for First-line Antiretroviral Therapy

getwell
 

Iowa State University scientist helps to develop rice plants to neutralize HIV transmission

megamike48@...
 

Scientists successfully developed a transgenic rice plant that expresses three different proteins that can stop HIV from entering human cells. The finding could lead to a less costly, easier way of producing prophylactics that could stop the spread of HIV, particularly in the developing world.
https://www.news.iastate.edu/news/2018/08/16/ricehiv

43 Drugs Going Generic in the Next 5 Years #generics

Nelson Vergel
 

Please disseminate among your networks.

Jeff Taylor
 




Come and learn about the latest HIV CURE Research. Open to Orlando's General HIV Community. -Not USCA registration is needed

.




NMAC

1000 Vermont

Washington, DC 20005

Cell 202.836.3669

magosto@...  

NMAC  USCA  Summit
NMAC leads with race to urgently fight for health equity and racial justice to end the HIV epidemic in America

NMAC encourages green practices and asks you to print this message only as needed. 


--
Jeff Taylor
Co-Moderator

One in nine people may be able to control their viral load after stopping treatment, US study finds

Jeff Taylor
 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Louella, Michael W <mlouella@...>
Date: Fri, Aug 17, 2018 at 1:16 PM
Subject: One in nine people may be able to control their viral load after stopping treatment, US study finds
To: "mlouella@..." <mlouella@...>


Hello my Sweets –

 

I first saw this cure-related research come from the 2018 CROI conference, but not much was made of it in the press.

 

No one seemed to talk about it. 

 

And so I thought maybe I dreamt it.

 

J

 

 

Now we have a research article published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, and a news report by aidsmap.com.

 

Perhaps I was not dreaming after all.

 

 

I am about to take some time off.

 

And so, I wanted to leave you with this bit of cure science to linger over.

 

 

You’ll find the links to the articles, plus the manuscript (attached) and the poster from CROI (pasted below).

 

 

I will see you again on Aug 28 and on Sep 4, but not fully back in the office until Sept 10.

 

Xxo,

 

Michael

 

 

 

From aidsmap:

 

http://www.aidsmap.com/One-in-nine-people-may-be-able-to-control-their-viral-load-after-stopping-treatment-US-study-finds/page/3323757/

 

 

One in nine people may be able to control their viral load after stopping treatment, US study finds

Most treated early: but one in 20 people treated in chronic infection may be controllers too

Gus Cairns

Published: 16 August 2018

A US collaboration that pooled data from 14 scientific studies containing between them more than 600 HIV-positive people has found that 67 of them were able to maintain or re-establish a viral load below 400 copies/ml for at least 48 weeks after their antiretroviral therapy (ART) was stopped.

This is the first large study to estimate the proportion of people who might be ‘post-treatment controllers’ since the VISCONTI cohort in 2013. This found 14 such controllers, suggesting that nearly one in six people who started ART less than six months after infection might be able to control their viral loads for at least a year after being taken off ART.

The CHAMP study

The present study, called CHAMP (Control of HIV after Antiretroviral Medication Pause), looked at ten randomised controlled trials and four cohort studies conducted in the US and Canada with results published from 2000 to 2017.

Most of these were studies of treatment interruption, either in its own right, or alongside a therapeutic vaccination or other immune treatment. Three of the four cohort studies were of people treated in early HIV infection while the fourth was of people already known to be viral controllers.

The average age of the participants was 41 with no difference between those treated in early and chronic infection. Nineteen per cent were women. Sixty-nine per cent were white and 25% black. The definition used by CHAMP of a post-treatment controller was that the person had to have a viral load below 400 copies/ml at least two-thirds of the time for at least 48 weeks after stopping ART.

How many post-treatment controllers?

The researchers found that 13% of people who started ART soon after infection were able to achieve post-treatment viral control by this definition. This is very close to the VISCONTI researchers’ estimate that 15% of people treated in early infection might be post-treatment controllers.

CHAMP in addition looked for post-treatment controllers who did not start ART until they were in chronic infection. It found 25 of these, representing 4% of people. This is the first time a study has come up with an estimate for the proportion of people who start treatment in chronic HIV infection who may be post-treatment controllers.

The average time people had been on ART before they stopped was two years, four months in people treated early and five years, seven months for those who didn't start ART till later

The average duration of post-treatment viral suppression was 89 weeks – about a year and nine months. Three-quarters of people maintained viral control for more than a year, and 22% of them for at least five years. Although few people were followed for longer than this, the researchers say that two people, both treated in early infection, still have viral suppression more than ten years after stopping ART.

Post-treatment controllers generally maintained their CD4 counts, with only a slight decline of 32 cells/mm3 a year, compared with 221 cells/ mm3 in non-controllers.

CHAMP used a relatively broad definition of viral suppression. The researchers point out that if having a viral load under 400 copies/ml for at least 90% of the time had been the criterion, the proportion qualifying as post-treatment controllers would only be 8% of early-treated and 2% of later-treated people.

Transient viral rebound

This relaxed criterion turned out to be important. The CHAMP researchers found that 40% of post-treatment controllers had at least one viral load measurement over 400 copies/ml after stopping ART and 31% over 1000 copies/ml. However, these viral load peaks happened soon after ART was withdrawn (on average eight weeks, and never more than 24 weeks, after) and they then re-suppressed their HIV.

The researchers also looked at the minority of people who had had their viral loads monitored very intensively – once a week on average. In this minority, transient high viral load peaks were found more often. Two-thirds had at least one viral load higher than 400 copies/ml after ART withdrawal, 45% over 1000 copies/ml, 33% over 10,000 copies/ml and 11% over 100,000 copies/ml.

The researchers speculate that these short bursts of viral replication may actually contribute to the later viral suppression, at least in some people, as they may stimulate a suppressive anti-HIV immune response.

They also note that treatment interruption studies that have strict criteria about whether to re-start ART – typically after just one or two viral loads over a few hundred copies/ml – may miss a lot of people who would have gone on to re-suppress their HIV.

This pooling of studies lacks certain data, such as pre-treatment viral loads for those treated in chronic infection, but it does find that pre-treatment viral load in those treated in early infection was only slightly lower in post-treatment controllers than non-controllers – about 50,000 versus 80,000 copies/ml – and their CD4 counts at ART interruption also very similar – 882 cells/mmfor controllers and 825 cells/mm3 for non-controllers.

The return of an old idea – pulsed treatment interruptions?

There is one interesting detail: 42% of post-treatment controllers who started ART in chronic infection came from a single study, ACTG 5068. Ten per cent of people in this study ended up being post-treatment controllers compared with 3% in all other studies of people starting treatment in chronic infection.

The distinguishing feature of this study was that it used so-called ‘pulsed treatment interruptions’. This means that after initially stopping ART, people were put on two short treatment interruptions of 4-6 weeks, with a period of ART in between, before ART was discontinued indefinitely. This was a randomised trial and in the people who received the pulsed treatment interruptions, 15% became post-treatment controllers – as high a proportion as those starting ART in early infection.

This is a suggestive detail as the pulsed interruptions are about long enough to allow the short viral load bursts that may lead, researchers hypothesise, to what they call ‘auto-immunisation’ against HIV.

However, this still only led to 15% of people becoming post-treatment controllers and the combination of factors that lead to a minority of people being able to control their HIV off-treatment, while the majority do not, remain mysterious.

As long as they do remain mysterious, only a small proportion of people will undergo the structured treatment interruptions that might shed light on the science. But at least this US study confirms that post-treatment control is not an especially rare phenomenon.

Reference

Namazi G et al. The Control of HIV after Antiretroviral Medication Pause (CHAMP) study: post-treatment controllers identified from 14 clinical studies. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiy479. August 2018.

 

 

 

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

From JID

 

https://academic.oup.com/jid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiy479/5067282

 

Also see attached manuscript:

The Control of HIV after Antiretroviral Medication Pause (CHAMP) study: post treatment controllers identified from 14 clinical studies

 

ABSTRACT

 

Background: HIV post-treatment controllers are rare individuals who start antiretroviral therapy (ART), but maintain HIV suppression after treatment interruption. The frequency of post-treatment control and post-treatment interruption viral dynamics have not been well-characterized.

 

Methods: Post-treatment controllers were identified from 14 studies and defined as individuals who underwent treatment interruption with viral loads ≤400 copies/mL at ≥2/3 of time points for ≥24 weeks. Viral load and CD4+ cell dynamics were compared between post-treatment controllers and non-controllers.

 

Results: Of the 67 post-treatment controllers identified, 38 initiated ART during early HIV infection. Post-treatment controllers were more frequently identified in those treated during early vs. chronic infection (13% vs. 4%, P<0.001). In post-treatment controllers with weekly viral load monitoring, 45% had a peak post-treatment interruption viral load of ≥1,000 copies/mL and 33% had a peak viral load ≥10,000 copies/mL. 55% of post treatment controllers maintained HIV control for 2 years, with approximately 20% maintaining control for ≥5 years.

 

Conclusions: Post-treatment control was more commonly identified amongst early treated individuals, frequently characterized by early transient viral rebound and heterogeneous durability of HIV remission. These results may provide mechanistic insights and has implications for the design of trials aimed at achieving HIV remission.

 

+++++++++++++++

 

 

From CROI 2018:

 

http://www.croiconference.org/sessions/champ-cohort-post-treatment-controllers-identified-9-clinical-studies

 

 

 

 

Michael Louella

Community Engagement Project Manager/defeatHIV

Outreach Coordinator/UW ACTU

Community Liaison / UW Fred Hutch CFAR

 

 

www.facebook.com/defeatHIVseattle

 

www.facebook.com/UWACTU

 

https://www.facebook.com/UWCFAR

 

 

******************************************************************

The above email may contain patient identifiable or confidential

information. Because email is not secure, please be aware of

associated risks of email transmission. If you are a patient,

communicating to a UW Medicine Provider via email implies

your agreement to email communication; see

http://www.uwmedicine.org/Global/Compliance/EmailRisk.htm

 

The information is intended for the individual named above. If

you are not the intended recipient, any disclosure, copying,

distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. 

Please notify the sender by reply email, and then destroy all copies

of the message and any attachments.  See our Notice of Privacy

Practices at www.uwmedicine.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



--
Jeff Taylor
Co-Moderator

The Washington Post: The midterms are less than 3 months away. These are the key races to watch.

Nelson Vergel
 


The midterms are less than 3 months away. These are the key races to watch.
The Washington Post

Winners and losers from Tuesday’s primaries. Read the full story


Shared from Apple News



 All the best,

Nelson Vergel

Re: The Washington Post: The midterms etc etc (comment)...

Edward K.
 

Nelson et al
Please do NOT provide any links to the Washington Post. The Post will not allow you to read ANY article unless you pay them, no "few freebies per month". They fill news feeds with links, hoping that you will finally tire of getting the grey screen of "pay-up" and you'll give them your $50 a year. I might pay, but maybe $1 a week, like the ny times, but not $50. Besides, the Post is so slanted in it's articles, i'm not sure i could stand it for a year...

Sometimes you can copy the exact title into a "private" browser, search google, and click on the post article (like sometimes on the WS Journal), but that doesn't always work. 
--
Edward K
Dumaguete, Negros Oriental
Philippines

Efficacy and safety of semaglutide compared with liraglutide and placebo for weight loss in patients with obesity: a randomised, double-blind, placebo and active controlled, dose-ranging, phase 2 trial - The Lancet

Nelson Vergel
 

Dr. Gerald Peirone has been telling me about his good results using this drug to reduce visceral fat and weight in his HIV+ patients 
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)31773-2/fulltext?rss=yes

Efficacy and safety of semaglutide compared with liraglutide and placebo for weight loss in patients with obesity: a randomised, double-blind, placebo and active controlled, dose-ranging, phase 2 trial

Background

Obesity is a major public health issue, and new pharmaceuticals for weight management are needed. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue semaglutide in comparison with liraglutide and a placebo in promoting weight loss.

Methods

We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo and active controlled, multicentre, dose-ranging, phase 2 trial. The study was done in eight countries involving 71 clinical sites. Eligible participants were adults (≥18 years) without diabetes and with a body-mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m 2 or more. We randomly assigned participants (6:1) to each active treatment group (ie, semaglutide [0·05 mg, 0·1 mg, 0·2 mg, 0·3 mg, or 0·4 mg; initiated at 0·05 mg per day and incrementally escalated every 4 weeks] or liraglutide [3·0 mg; initiated at 0·6 mg per day and escalated by 0·6 mg per week]) or matching placebo group (equal injection volume and escalation schedule to active treatment group) using a block size of 56. All treatment doses were delivered once-daily via subcutaneous injections. Participants and investigators were masked to the assigned study treatment but not the target dose. The primary endpoint was percentage weight loss at week 52. The primary analysis was done using intention-to-treat ANCOVA estimation with missing data derived from the placebo pool. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02453711.

Findings

Between Oct 1, 2015, and Feb 11, 2016, 957 individuals were randomly assigned (102–103 participants per active treatment group and 136 in the pooled placebo group). Mean baseline characteristics included age 47 years, bodyweight 111·5 kg, and BMI 39·3 kg/m 2. Bodyweight data were available for 891 (93%) of 957 participants at week 52. Estimated mean weight loss was −2·3% for the placebo group versus −6·0% (0·05 mg), −8·6% (0·1 mg), −11·6% (0·2 mg), −11·2% (0·3 mg), and −13·8% (0·4 mg) for the semaglutide groups. All semaglutide groups versus placebo were significant (unadjusted p≤0·0010), and remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing (p≤0·0055). Mean bodyweight reductions for 0·2 mg or more of semaglutide versus liraglutide were all significant (−13·8% to −11·2% vs −7·8%). Estimated weight loss of 10% or more occurred in 10% of participants receiving placebo compared with 37–65% receiving 0·1 mg or more of semaglutide (p<0·0001 vs placebo). All semaglutide doses were generally well tolerated, with no new safety concerns. The most common adverse events were dose-related gastrointestinal symptoms, primarily nausea, as seen previously with GLP-1 receptor agonists.

Interpretation

In combination with dietary and physical activity counselling, semaglutide was well tolerated over 52 weeks and showed clinically relevant weight loss compared with placebo at all doses.

Funding

Novo Nordisk A/S.

To read this article in full you will need to make a payment


 All the best,

Nelson Vergel

Video: Interview with Dr Gerald Pierone About HIV Lipodystrophy Options

Nelson Vergel
 

Watch video!
https://youtu.be/trx3H_kGbpw


All the best,

Nelson Vergel