Portland leases 3 more hotels to shift Covid-19 most-vulnerable from shelters or shared housing


Tim McCormick
 

https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


David Groff
 

Tim,

Why don't you contact Molly?  She talked with me about the work of the Interfaith Alliance.  I think she would be to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

David

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, 02:30:18 PM PDT, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Keliferous Goodwoman
 

Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!


On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Andrew Olshin
 


Cascadia Clusters Houseless Construction Trainee Finishing up the roof for the ADA mobile hygiene unit we are almost ready to deploy.  Sure hope it gets leased.  
Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 12:07 PM, Keliferous Goodwoman <kellygoodman65@...> wrote:


Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Trena Sutton
 

 Hello all, 

 A couple of years ago I had a sit down with the director of the Bethlehem Inn  which was a close motel that was renovated by the faith based community in Bend Oregon. 

 It  has been extremely  successful and help many of the homeless in Deschutes county. They designed it as a place to work on getting into permanent housing and they do place a time limit on it. They are required to work with caseworkers  and comply with the recommendations which are very reasonable. 

This  Coalition  may want to contact Todd Cooper at the archdiocese of Portland.

 They’ve been very involved with homeless issues as well as house people who are disenfranchised. I’ve had conversations with other community faith members and I know if there were a faith based coalition this would be  very attractive and inviting for the communities as a whole. 

 Blessing,

Trena 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman <kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Tim McCormick
 

Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman <kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Marilyn Mauch
 

It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  

On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:



Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 




Andrew Olshin
 

I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:


It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:



Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 




Marilyn Mauch
 


Andy you're always great, I would venture to say without a doubt inspiring -- you don't give up! 

So, what is being planned in re outcomes of the forum with regard to managed tent villages?  Can we push forward some ideas on that front or is that not wise/profitable?  

We know from  Sandra Comstock and Raven that we need some "scouts" to entice/convince some of the homeless to come in from "the cold."  We know that Andy has a shower/laundry mobile facility.  Can congregations provide food?  OR, ARE WE TO LEAVE ALL THIS UP TO THE CITY and wait until they come forward with these nuts and bolts?   What's the best strategy that others have in mind?   Marilyn

On 07/31/2020 1:31 PM Andrew Olshin <andrew.olshin@...> wrote:


I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:

It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:



Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 




Tim McCormick
 

I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.

awesome!  
You may be thinking of this already, but I'd suggest as a way of bringing different strands together here, we collectively explore how dwellings (etc) from Cascadia Clusters might be combined with siting possibilities with: 
  1. the emerging Portland Shelter to Housing Continuum Program (S2HC) and possibly 
  2. Oregon new emergency shelter bill HB4001
  3. C3PO camps relocation.  
A village approach might be developed that both aligns with S2HC as currently proposed, and informs the final form of it as the code is tested against a working prototype(s). This/these villages could be developed now or soon, as opposed to waiting for S2HC coming into effect, which is likely March 2021 or later. 

Some approaches using S2HC or related reforms that occur to me are: 
  1. mobile dwellings & facilities that could plausibly be relocated every six months, thus doable with S2HC's proposed low-barrier permitting for 6-month-duration "outdoor shelters".  

  2. mobile dwellings that could move to siting as vehicle dwellings on private residential properties, as currently decriminalized in Portland and advocated for legalization either under S2HC by advocates including me, Planning Commission chair Eli Spevak, and local ADU expert Kol Peterson. This could also be done by amending city Accessory Dwelling Units regulations to allow mobile units, as has been done e.g. by the cities of Los Angeles, San Jose, Fresno etc. 

  3. mobile dwellings that could be sited now or later on church/community-based organizations properties

  4. mobile dwellings that could be (re-)sited as building-code compliant, on-foundation Accessory Dwelling Units. This might be done by using an anchor-to-foundation approach whereby unit could be attached, possibly also later detached. It's possible the mobile unit might need to be modified, combined with another, etc. for this to work, from code or viability perspectives. However if units were designed with this path in mind, it might be quite possible.  [this is the model proposed in a Portland initiative called New Starter Homes which I've worked on]. 
Screen Shot 2020-06-30 at 9.47.57 AM.png

C3PO camps: (Old Town one shown above): these are in urgent need of an exit/transition plan, because word is that both Joint Office of Homelessness Services and current lead service provider JOINpdx are looking to end their roles soon, even before the Covid-19 Emergency Declaration ends. What if we here developed some proposal scenarios for the next phase of these communities, looking at components such as Cascadia Clusters, SH2C, Right 2 Dream Too governance approach, etc? 
Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at HousingWiki, Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:31 PM Andrew Olshin <andrew.olshin@...> wrote:
I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:


It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:





_._,_._,_


Marilyn Mauch
 

I was wondering Andy -- assuming you had a site approved for the tiny homes, what's your best estimate for how long from start to finish it would take to erect the tiny homes you have financing set up for?  Marilyn

On 07/31/2020 2:19 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.

awesome!  
You may be thinking of this already, but I'd suggest as a way of bringing different strands together here, we collectively explore how dwellings (etc) from Cascadia Clusters might be combined with siting possibilities with: 
  1. the emerging Portland Shelter to Housing Continuum Program (S2HC) and possibly 
  2. Oregon new emergency shelter bill HB4001
  3. C3PO camps relocation.  
A village approach might be developed that both aligns with S2HC as currently proposed, and informs the final form of it as the code is tested against a working prototype(s). This/these villages could be developed now or soon, as opposed to waiting for S2HC coming into effect, which is likely March 2021 or later. 

Some approaches using S2HC or related reforms that occur to me are: 
  1. mobile dwellings & facilities that could plausibly be relocated every six months, thus doable with S2HC's proposed low-barrier permitting for 6-month-duration "outdoor shelters".  

  2. mobile dwellings that could move to siting as vehicle dwellings on private residential properties, as currently decriminalized in Portland and advocated for legalization either under S2HC by advocates including me, Planning Commission chair Eli Spevak, and local ADU expert Kol Peterson. This could also be done by amending city Accessory Dwelling Units regulations to allow mobile units, as has been done e.g. by the cities of Los Angeles, San Jose, Fresno etc. 

  3. mobile dwellings that could be sited now or later on church/community-based organizations properties

  4. mobile dwellings that could be (re-)sited as building-code compliant, on-foundation Accessory Dwelling Units. This might be done by using an anchor-to-foundation approach whereby unit could be attached, possibly also later detached. It's possible the mobile unit might need to be modified, combined with another, etc. for this to work, from code or viability perspectives. However if units were designed with this path in mind, it might be quite possible.  [this is the model proposed in a Portland initiative called New Starter Homes which I've worked on]. 
Screen Shot 2020-06-30 at 9.47.57 AM.png

C3PO camps: (Old Town one shown above): these are in urgent need of an exit/transition plan, because word is that both Joint Office of Homelessness Services and current lead service provider JOINpdx are looking to end their roles soon, even before the Covid-19 Emergency Declaration ends. What if we here developed some proposal scenarios for the next phase of these communities, looking at components such as Cascadia Clusters, SH2C, Right 2 Dream Too governance approach, etc? 
Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:31 PM Andrew Olshin < andrew.olshin@...> wrote:
I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch < m_mauch@...> wrote:

It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:






Andrew Olshin
 

Marilyn

Thanks for the question.   Cascadia Clusters has been involved in development of Hazelnut Grove, Kenton Women's Village and Agape Village.  Each has been a unique situation.   
As for near term development of additional alternative shelter capacity, I’d begin with the existing independent villages - Agape and Hazelnut Grove.   The only way to find out About what is and is not working in the environment  is by visiting and talking with folks living there.   Talk to Joe, Matt and Ron at Agape AND Bob, Will and Jesse at the Grove.   
As for how long it would take to “set up the tiny homes we have financing for”, please give me a call or just stop by our build site on Capitol Hwy (across from Seasons and Regions Grill).   We have numerous projects in our pipeline and would be happy to discuss all sorts of scenarios. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin
(503) 407-8494

On Aug 1, 2020, at 11:39 AM, Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:


I was wondering Andy -- assuming you had a site approved for the tiny homes, what's your best estimate for how long from start to finish it would

take to erect the tiny homes you have financing set up for?  Marilyn
On 07/31/2020 2:19 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.

awesome!  
You may be thinking of this already, but I'd suggest as a way of bringing different strands together here, we collectively explore how dwellings (etc) from Cascadia Clusters might be combined with siting possibilities with: 
  1. the emerging Portland Shelter to Housing Continuum Program (S2HC) and possibly 
  2. Oregon new emergency shelter bill HB4001
  3. C3PO camps relocation.  
A village approach might be developed that both aligns with S2HC as currently proposed, and informs the final form of it as the code is tested against a working prototype(s). This/these villages could be developed now or soon, as opposed to waiting for S2HC coming into effect, which is likely March 2021 or later. 

Some approaches using S2HC or related reforms that occur to me are: 
  1. mobile dwellings & facilities that could plausibly be relocated every six months, thus doable with S2HC's proposed low-barrier permitting for 6-month-duration "outdoor shelters".  

  2. mobile dwellings that could move to siting as vehicle dwellings on private residential properties, as currently decriminalized in Portland and advocated for legalization either under S2HC by advocates including me, Planning Commission chair Eli Spevak, and local ADU expert Kol Peterson. This could also be done by amending city Accessory Dwelling Units regulations to allow mobile units, as has been done e.g. by the cities of Los Angeles, San Jose, Fresno etc. 

  3. mobile dwellings that could be sited now or later on church/community-based organizations properties

  4. mobile dwellings that could be (re-)sited as building-code compliant, on-foundation Accessory Dwelling Units. This might be done by using an anchor-to-foundation approach whereby unit could be attached, possibly also later detached. It's possible the mobile unit might need to be modified, combined with another, etc. for this to work, from code or viability perspectives. However if units were designed with this path in mind, it might be quite possible.  [this is the model proposed in a Portland initiative called New Starter Homes which I've worked on]. 
<Screen Shot 2020-06-30 at 9.47.57 AM.png>


C3PO camps: (Old Town one shown above): these are in urgent need of an exit/transition plan, because word is that both Joint Office of Homelessness Services and current lead service provider JOINpdx are looking to end their roles soon, even before the Covid-19 Emergency Declaration ends. What if we here developed some proposal scenarios for the next phase of these communities, looking at components such as Cascadia Clusters, SH2C, Right 2 Dream Too governance approach, etc? 
Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:31 PM Andrew Olshin < andrew.olshin@...> wrote:
I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch < m_mauch@...> wrote:

It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:






Keliferous Goodwoman
 

Right on!


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020, 1:31 PM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:
I’m looking forward to building the next village and the next.  Construction financing is lined up.  Cascadia Clusters will be ready to hire more houseless construction trainees soon. 

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jul 31, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:


It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:



Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 




Verna Dunlap
 

Now that the dust is settling, let's buy them up. We will need these anyway in the future. 
Verna Dunlap, CEO LCT4vets

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:21 PM Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:
It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  
On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:



Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.

I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:
Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:
https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]

--
Tim McCormick
Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 




Mary Jaron Kelley <mary@...>
 

https://multco.us/novel-coronavirus-covid-19/news/longer-term-plan-covid-19-moves-forward-joint-office-opens-three-new

 

Mary Jaron Kelley
Associate Program Director | North Portland Neighborhood Services
Office of Community & Civic Life
Historic Kenton Firehouse
2209 N. Schofield Street

Portland, Oregon 97217
503-823-8877 (cell) new number

mary@...

www. Facebook.com/NorthPortlandNeighborhoodServices
http://www.npnscommunity.org

 

I am in the office Monday-Thursday.

Pronouns: she/her/hers

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Verna Dunlap via groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 11:50 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Portland leases 3 more hotels to shift Covid-19 most-vulnerable from shelters or shared housing

 

Now that the dust is settling, let's buy them up. We will need these anyway in the future. 

Verna Dunlap, CEO LCT4vets

 

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:21 PM Marilyn Mauch <m_mauch@...> wrote:

It just seems a travesty that the planning doc you attached -- that the city has a timeline of March 2021 which just seems like too late to wrap up their thinking, but we have to live with it, in addressing alternative housing models.    As you note below, it's too bad that an article didn't appear touting the planning doc you cited and the forum.  Is it time for some folks to visit JoAnn Hardesty or has that already been done?  We need an "angel" someplace on the city council that we can collaborate with in advancing/pushing the city forward faster on alternative ways to house those in need.  Or, maybe you all have been working on this and I'm just "out of the loop."  My primary community organizing experience has been as the Alliance's rep. to Living Cully's community housing action team under the guidance of Cameron Herrington.  Eudaly's staff have been extremely helpful in working together with Living Cully's forward work.  How about a letter to the editor for the Oregonian or is this not a propitious time to do that?  

On 07/31/2020 12:56 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Why don't you contact Molly?.. I think she would be [open] to hearing about alternative approaches to meeting the needs of the unhoused.


I have, many times, including with an announcement about the PDX Shelter Forum event, and about the article mentioned above; have many times shared and complimented her articles. I've often shared to her story angles and back-stories which I think have not been covered, such as, way back in March when hardly anyone had heard of it, City of Portland's Shelter to Housing Continuum Program. This is the key City land-use program regarding shelters and homelessness, but has never yet been mentioned in media that I've seen, and it is now approaching the Planning Bureau's very narrow planned window for public comment, with hardly any public discussion or official proposal released yet.  

She interviewed me at length in March, by phone which I generally don't do but she wouldn't do by email/text, after I'd suggested online that we develop resident-managed villages and campgrounds in response to Covid-19; for a story she said would be coming out on this. (This was before the C3PO camps had been announced). That story never came out, at least not one discussing the proposals I talked about with her (from Sarah Iannarone, et al). This was the last and one of the few times she's ever engaged. 

I don't think this is unusual, or want to blame Molly; I think it's just typical patterns of how traditional media work, that 'stories' mostly follow known narratives, "conventional wisdom", and official/powerful sources. What's interesting to me is how we might do better, by replacing or supplementing or interoperating this with more open, symmetric, participatory, accumulative, fluid, diverse, & radical media -- rather than 'broadcast'/fixed, centralized, published-once, absentee/commercial/chain-owned like the The Oregonian. In part, PDX Shelter Forum is for me a small experiment in doing so for a particular topic area. 

 

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 12:05 PM Keliferous Goodwoman < kellygoodman65@...> wrote:

Great points! More of the history and current efforts/voices/possible solutions need to be included..disseminated!

 

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 2:30 PM Tim McCormick < tmccormick@...> wrote:

https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/07/officials-balked-at-homeless-shelter-motels-price-tag-now-continue-to-add-more-in-portland.html

Yet another article in which the only quoted sources are officials (Mayor, and Joint Office spokesperson Denis Theriault, and the news peg is an official action. You would never know from Oregonian homelessness reporter Molly Harbarger's story that others in the community have views on this or might have other proposals. Or that Commissioner Hardesty harshly criticized the funding programs recently in City Council hearing for so predominantly focusing on people already in shelter or housing, rather than the unsheltered.

Or that, contrary to the story's and the officials' framing of this effort as for "the vulnerable homeless," homelessness experts widely argue that *all* unhoused, particularly those unsheltered, are highly vulnerable to Covid-19 and other health/safety issues, and also that the congregate shelters which City/County continue to primarily depend on are considered highly unsafe in general.  Or that there are broad community efforts, going back years, to develop alternative shelter models to help more people sooner, in more private and thus safe ways than these traditional shelters. 

For me, this sort of steadily disappointing, narrow, context-less, official/dominant-voice oriented media coverage of homelessness issues is a key reason to build alternative fora such PDX Shelter Forum. We just so clearly get so little of the picture, or possibilities, or range of voices/views, from traditional media. 

-------
"The Joint Office of Homeless Services, funded by the city and Multnomah County, opened three more motels this month to house people who had been lodged in temporary emergency coronavirus shelters in public buildings. There are now four such motels, two of which the city and county have an option to buy.

"The two governing councils agreed to spend more than $22M from federal CARES Act money on the motel initiative, which includes providing meals and social services such as housing placement, employment help and case management.

"Another $11M is allocated for leasing and operating two motels that hold people who are sick with COVID-19 or show symptoms of the contagious and potentially deadly disease. Those motels also accept people who aren’t homeless, but live in houses or apartments that don’t have space for them to fully isolate."

"Neither the city nor county boards have so far agreed to purchase the motels they are leasing. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler appeared to indicate he was open to buying the motels, which he said could later be repurposed into affordable housing. [...]

"Commissioners from both the city and county balked in May at the price tag of leasing motels for use as shelters, saying they wanted to get more than short-term housing from their investment." [...]


--

Tim McCormick

Editor at  HousingWiki, Organizer at  Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon