Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments


Tim McCormick
 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


ann mcmullen
 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim McCormick
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:26 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 


Tim McCormick
 

the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...>
 

No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Joseph Purkey
 

This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Peter Finley Fry
 

We accept the lie that somehow humans are different and special.  Humans have enormously negative impacts on the ecology of the earth.  The goal of planning is to minimize and eliminate these impacts through providing sewer systems; landfills; homes; etc. that allow us to contain the pollution that each of us cause.

 

These impacts can be contained in a home or a camp site or within a person.  The problem is that things get political, loud, noisy, and harmful as individuals seek to dominate others and demand privaleged.  The reduction of impact is the reduction of impact on the earth not the precious sensibility of some perceived other rich undeserving selfish human.    

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry   AICP BS PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Purkey via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 4:49 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

 

-Joe

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

 

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



 

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



 

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



 

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



 

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



 

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



 

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



 

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



 

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."

 

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:

No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

 

Betsy Hammond

 

 

 

Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics

 

 

 

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Elise Aymer
 

Here is the text of the Oregon Live/Oregonian article Tim referenced. 

I am reposting, as it's a frustration that while the Multnomah Public Library subscribes to a service that gives access to current issues/articles of the Oregonian (https://proxy.multcolib.org/login?url=http://infoweb.newsbank.com/cgi-bin/remote/login.pl?db=ORGB), articles like this one are excluded as "Subscriber Exclusive" content, limiting public access to important information. Not everyone will access municipal press releases and other documents:

Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
Updated 3:18 PM; Today 9:01 AM

By Nicole Hayden | The Oregonian/OregonLive
The city of Portland announced Wednesday it plans to more aggressively clean, downsize or remove homeless encampments starting Monday.

After a year of avoiding or limiting encampment evictions, the city will act more strictly. The change comes after officials in charge of cleaning and removing street camping sites concluded their passive approach “has been ineffective,” according to a memo released by the city.

Instead of allowing extended time for campers to comply with rules – including separating tents by at least six feet and keeping sidewalks, building entrances and accessibility ramps clear for pedestrians – the city will instead immediately post an eviction notice if certain health and safety concerns are present. The office that wrote the new rules answers to Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler via his chief administrative officer and longtime ally Tom Rinehart.

“We have found that encampments return to a state of non-compliance within a matter of days, if not hours, depending on the location,” according to the memo written by city staff.

In a joint statement, all five city commissioners expressed support for the change, casting the stepped up evictions as good for people experiencing homelessness.

“These new protocols reprioritize public health and safety among houseless Portlanders and aim to improve sanitary conditions until we have additional shelter beds and housing available,” Wheeler and the rest of the City Council wrote. “Bureaus are currently inventorying city-owned properties for viable shelter or camping sites.”

The city does not know, however, how quickly or in what number new shelters on city property or elsewhere will open.

Tony Ngo, who has been living in a tent for six months in Old Town, said he believes the city should have more sanctioned campsites or tiny home villages available before kicking people off the sidewalk where they currently sleep. He said the cycle of tent removals is harmful to people who have nowhere else to go.

“I was asked to leave where I was sleeping because a business didn’t want me there, so they kicked me out because they said I was impacting tourism,” Ngo said. “But it is hard to find another place to go because wherever I go, they kick me out, so it is hard to figure out where I can sleep.”

THE NEW RULES

Immediate eviction notices will be posted at high-impact campsites which meet at least one of the following criteria, the city memo says:

- Human waste is prevalent
- Biohazardous materials, including needles, are present
- City officials declare an encampment a fire hazard
- Observers report repeated violence or criminal activity
- The encampment is impacting a school
- Tents and other materials are blocking sidewalks or impacting access to curb cuts or other accessibility measures
- The city will prioritize evictions at encampments that have eight or more structures, a provision that would apply to many camp clusters around the city.

City officials and contractors will continue to give individuals 48 hours notice before an eviction, the memo says. However, the protocol change will eliminate the 24-hour compliance notice that typically would have come before the eviction notice. This means campers will have two days to pack up their belongings and move elsewhere before the city returns to remove any remaining personal belongings.

Additionally, the outreach team is no longer required to work with individuals at high-impact campsites before posting an eviction notice, said Heather Hafer, public information officer for the city department that oversees encampment clean ups. This means the city won’t always offer shelter or services prior to evicting campers, though they plan to continue sending their outreach team to many of the sites.

Eric Tars, legal director of the National Homelessness Law Center, said cities cannot legally displace people unless an adequate alternative place to sleep is provided.

Under a 2018 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling in a case out of Boise, the court decided that governments cannot criminalize conduct that is unavoidable as a result of experiencing homelessness. To punish a homeless individual for sleeping outside when there aren’t enough shelter beds would be comparable to punishing that individual for the fact that they are homeless, a consequence the court described as a cruel and unusual.

“The city (of Portland) says they are currently looking at alternative sites for shelters and sanctioned encampments and they haven’t found them yet, but they want to start this new policy immediately … The underlying principle remains the same: you cannot and should not displace people unless you can provide an adequate alternative,” Tars said.

In his view, only offering people beds at congregate indoor shelter where individuals say they don’t feel safe sleeping does not qualify as “adequate,” Tars added.

“If there is a homeless veteran with PTSD who won’t feel safe in a congregate situation, then that shelter bed is not an adequate alternative,” Tars said.

Tars said he doesn’t believe people are “shelter resistant,” but believes cities often don’t provide the type of dignified, safe shelter that people need.

Tars said he couldn’t immediately say if Portland’s new policy is illegal without reviewing it further, but he said he doesn’t believe the policy is focused on helping individuals experiencing homelessness.

MORE HOUSING CASEWORKERS NEEDED

At low-impact campsites, the city will continue to provide garbage removal and offer shelter, supportive services and survival gear including coats and tents.

Melissa Warkentin, who sleeps amid a row of tents on Northwest Sixth Avenue near Davis Street, said the navigation team rarely offered comprehensive services to her or her houseless neighbors even before these new rule changes.

“It is hit or miss if you see (the navigation team),” said Warkentin, who has experienced homelessness for the past three years. “They pick and choose who they help, but mostly they just offer food, hygiene kits or access to showers. It would be more helpful if actual caseworkers regularly came out to help with housing.”

Since launching in January 2019, the outreach team has provided housing referrals to just 4% of the 918 individuals they engaged with, according to outcome data that was last updated in March. The team also helped 27% of those they talked to receive identification, 13% sign up for the Oregon Health Plan and 4% be admitted to a substance abuse treatment center.

From March through July of 2020, the city did not evict any encampments but offered trash removal and hygiene services based on recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Multnomah County Health Department. Reducing displacements was believed to lower the odds of COVID-19 transmission.

At the end of July, the city began evicting encampments again but fewer than officials had in the past. But the city says it has continued to fail to get campers to abide by safety and cleanliness measures “to a standard accepted as satisfactory.”

Kaia Sand, director of Street Roots, a homelessness advocacy and resource organization, said she is disappointed with the new policy, calling it “reactive and destructive.”

“I feel like it signals a giving up on any semblance of a solutions-oriented strategy,” Sand said. “A constructive approach is to keep committing to the infrastructure need … Where there are people, there will be trash, so of course there is so much trash removal, but you have to keep going.”

Warkentin believes more time should be spent enforcing cleanliness rather than evicting campers.

“If one tent among the many tents is messy, they will make us all move,” she said. “They will tell us two move two blocks up or they will tell us there is nowhere for us to move to, but then new people will just move into the spot where we were kicked out and they will be allowed to stay.”

The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive updated the story throughout the day to add reactionary comments.

Nicole Hayden reports on homelessness for The Oregonian|OregonLive. She can be reached at nhayden@... or on Twitter @Nicole_A_Hayden.





Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 2:25 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Elise Aymer
 

Whoa, Ann,

There were so many heavy bits of information in that Willamette Week article about Mayor Wheeler's representative Sam Adams meeting with downtown Portland law firm partners:

- That it was completely a discussion between power brokers -- the partner and essentially the mayoralty about the houseless yet without them.

- Sam Adams was asking for "backing" from the law firm partners yet notably no money. I always think that's interesting when public officials pledge services and therefore funds to private entities with deep pockets.

- The pitch from Sam Adams was about moving homeless folks to sites outside of the downtown. So, again, no agency from these folks. They are to be moved like furniture and I expect if they don't want to go and resist, by force.

- Mention made of how another powerful group, Portland homeowners in neighborhoods to which the houseless would be moved, would try to block the initiative. So, again, the important people aren't the homeless folks, yet the law firms trump the homeowners. Gotta love a pecking order like that.

- Then the law firms are apparently putting the squeeze on the mayor by threatening to relocate outside of Portland. The article also implied that Wheeler needs their support and that of other business leaders to win in the upcoming recall election. So, flexing all around.

We are left to wonder what and where re these camps and whether there is any intention to have public consultation and more importantly input from the people most impacted by what seems to be an already formed plan.

And are these upcoming sweeps phase one of that plan?

Elise

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 2:47 PM ann mcmullen <ann@...> wrote:

Latest from Willy Week…..

https://www.wweek.com/news/city/2021/05/19/portlands-mayor-asks-downtown-law-firms-for-help-with-a-plan-to-relocate-people-sleeping-in-front-of-their-offices/?fbclid=IwAR3Ki5X7fSbW_08AVtEPhaMIXtk0--CcK7uRraTsOAanZQGprRAyiqjvu_E

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim McCormick
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:26 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Andrew Olshin
 

Peter
👍🏻

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 19, 2021, at 4:56 PM, Peter Finley Fry <peter@...> wrote:



We accept the lie that somehow humans are different and special.  Humans have enormously negative impacts on the ecology of the earth.  The goal of planning is to minimize and eliminate these impacts through providing sewer systems; landfills; homes; etc. that allow us to contain the pollution that each of us cause.

 

These impacts can be contained in a home or a camp site or within a person.  The problem is that things get political, loud, noisy, and harmful as individuals seek to dominate others and demand privaleged.  The reduction of impact is the reduction of impact on the earth not the precious sensibility of some perceived other rich undeserving selfish human.    

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry   AICP BS PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Purkey via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 4:49 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

 

-Joe

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

 

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



 

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



 

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



 

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



 

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



 

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



 

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



 

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



 

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."

 

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:

No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

 

Betsy Hammond

 

 

<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>

 

Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics

 

 

 

<AE1CEBAF34E74D589E9B7F70F8430199.png>

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Sue Gemmell
 

Did anyone else look at these stats, pause, and think, “wait... we spent how much money to do what?” 

“Since launching in January 2019, the outreach team has provided housing referrals to just 4% of the 918 individuals they engaged with, according to outcome data that was last updated in March. The team also helped 27% of those they talked to receive identification, 13% sign up for the Oregon Health Plan and 4% be admitted to a substance abuse treatment center.“

Sue


Tom Peck <tompecktorrence@...>
 

Please remove me from your mailing list.
I live in Eugene.
Thanks,
-Tom


Jeff Liddicoat
 

Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Elise Aymer
 

So beautifully written, Jeff.


On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Mimi German
 

I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Mimi German
 

One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005


On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Emerson This
 

@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Mimi German
 

When we first had the toilets removed twice by Nick Fish, we talked about that. We only got as far as bringing in the buckets w/ the toilet seat in a tall tent. Shitting into bags was just not going to work for folks. They tried it and said no. We didn't go through with more detailed compost toilets. I don't think we can do that where we are located now, either. We need to bring in toilets and talk a contractor into cleaning them for us. We can probably buy the toilets. We just need a company to commit to cleaning them twice a week. We'll be looking into that this coming week.

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:38 AM Emerson This <emersonthis@...> wrote:
@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Emerson This
 

@Mimi I’m interested to know more about why you don’t think composting toilets would work. I have some experience with this and I was also skeptical at the outset but then very pleasantly surprised by the results. I don’t want to hijack this thread but I’m happy to talk more about this offline if you’re interested. 

I’ll say one last thing here, in case other folks are curious about composting toilets. They aren’t complicated and they aren’t gross at all! If done properly, no one ever interacts with sewage. They don’t even smell. (I didn’t believe this either but it’s true). I’m not sure if composting toilets will be “the” way of the future, but flush toilet are definitely the way of the past. Our days of shitting into precious drinking water are numbered...

On May 22, 2021, at 6:47 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


When we first had the toilets removed twice by Nick Fish, we talked about that. We only got as far as bringing in the buckets w/ the toilet seat in a tall tent. Shitting into bags was just not going to work for folks. They tried it and said no. We didn't go through with more detailed compost toilets. I don't think we can do that where we are located now, either. We need to bring in toilets and talk a contractor into cleaning them for us. We can probably buy the toilets. We just need a company to commit to cleaning them twice a week. We'll be looking into that this coming week.

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:38 AM Emerson This <emersonthis@...> wrote:
@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

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Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
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Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon