Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites


Elise Aymer
 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her



Peter Finley Fry
 

I want to express my appreciation for this medium of education and communication.

 

I believe that the underlying cause of homelessness is the fragmentation of community in our nation; ironically caused by the fact that our nation is composed of refugees from all the nations of the world trying to find a way to restore their cultures and form new communities in this “promised land”.

 

This forum is an important part of bringing us together.  Thank you.   

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elise Aymer via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 11:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

 


Tim McCormick
 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Peter Finley Fry
 

Thoughtful comments

 

I continue to believe that there is an abundance of housing in this country.  To experience real housing shortages requires visiting the many countries torn apart by war.

 

I believe the fundamental issue is to build communities where people can live and support each other.

 

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 4:37 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

 

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

 

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

 

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Joseph Purkey
 

There must be a way to regulate out at least some of the profit from the housing market to allow housing to go back to being for people instead of pocket books. I have no brilliant ideas, sorry. Just still frustrated around (and agreeing with) Peter's point that there is not a shortage of built housing. 

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 | cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 4:46 PM Peter Finley Fry <peter@...> wrote:

Thoughtful comments

 

I continue to believe that there is an abundance of housing in this country.  To experience real housing shortages requires visiting the many countries torn apart by war.

 

I believe the fundamental issue is to build communities where people can live and support each other.

 

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 4:37 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

 

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

 

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

 

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Elise Aymer
 

Thanks, Tim, for those clarifications and corrections and the context and deeper observations missing from the NBC segment. 

That this is a grassroots, village effort definitely did not come through in the reporting, nor that it was so hard won.

One, detail I wondered about was the paid security mentioned.

Elise


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 7:37 PM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Elise Aymer
 

I am following up the initial video I shared on the Denver campsites with a video giving a more in-depth tour (apparently of a demo village Colorado Village Collaborative set up).

The speaker in the video is Cuica Montoya, who was featured in the NBC video. They (Cuica - unsure of pronouns) seem to have pitched their dialogue to an audience anxious about/skeptical of campsites for houseless persons. In this video, Cuica frames unsanctioned "encampments" as problematic in contrast to what Colorado Village Collaborative provides.

I'm sharing this because I know that I wanted to know more about what's happening with the Denver campsites given the surface nature of the NBC video. This video provided a tour of the set-up, structures and a description of the surfaces offered.

Of course, the issues that Tim raised around the nature of the housing (that dichotomy - transitional shelter vs. "home"), the larger problem, plus the way this video is framed/pitched are still there. I would argue, for example, that the amenities listed are what's needed all of the time, even outside of a pandemic.


It's from October 2020 and is 2 min 51 seconds

From another video, I watched on the campsites/villages, in winter they use (insulated) ice fishing tents and have heavy duty sleeping gear for residents, as well.

My understanding is that the sites receive private funding. I'm wondering about this.


It's much longer at 14 min 48 seconds and takes the form of an interview with a journalist who spent the night at and has been covering the sites. The link above starts five minutes in when they start to talk about the opposition the sites faced and why. Tim mentioned that it was difficult for the sites to find a "home" so I was wanting to know more about that. The problems will be familiar re Portland.

I find that I tend to take in information well that way and also can do other things while I listen - so am sharing this way..

I realize that video consumes bandwidth/data and so isn't a convenient way for everyone to access info. Apologies upfront.

The village org's link was given as https://www.coloradovillagecollaborative.org


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 8:55 PM Elise Aymer via groups.io <elise=criticaldiversitysolutions.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks, Tim, for those clarifications and corrections and the context and deeper observations missing from the NBC segment. 

That this is a grassroots, village effort definitely did not come through in the reporting, nor that it was so hard won.

One, detail I wondered about was the paid security mentioned.

Elise

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 7:37 PM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Jayme Delson
 

Hi all,

In my opinion Well Said Tim, all the way to the end.   

There are many reasons why national policy remains in service of its own interests, with little touch, or interest in the needs of the many.  There are many reasons why state and local public and non profits overwhelmingly tend to follow the lead of national policy. 

Clearly as we have seen, this has led us to where we are today.   Perhaps at some point enough of us will begin to follow and serve the interests of the most in need, bless them for they are the canary in the mine.
Cheers,

Jayme


On 7/8/2021 4:31 PM, Tim McCormick wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon