Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless


Angie Gilbert
 

The colorful community was built in just 13 weeks! A colorful village of 40 tiny homes opened up in Los Angeles earlier this month. While each 64-foot square unit can only hold one to two people, the project as a whole is a huge step forward when it comes to solving one of the city's biggest cris...

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Dave Weaver
 

That looks wonderful!  Very inspirational.
Thanks for sharing Angie.

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 9:28 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
The colorful community was built in just 13 weeks! A colorful village of 40 tiny homes opened up in Los Angeles earlier this month. While each 64-foot square unit can only hold one to two people, the project as a whole is a huge step forward when it comes to solving one of the city's biggest cris...

View the article.
https://flip.it/yeZP7B

View the article + more on Flipboard.
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Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 


Margaret Zebroski
 

Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Melinda Henning
 

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Tommy Kiser
 

Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Jayme Delson
 

Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Joseph Purkey
 

This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Lauren Everett <Le28@...>
 

The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Sandra Comstock
 

If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Melinda Henning
 

Joe, thank you for introducing me/us to the concept of biophilic design, something many of us intuitively know - but you provided explanation, examples, and science that can help us effectively advocate. And I see elements in the photos of St. John’s Village that could easily, it seems, be integrated into other projects with some care. I so appreciate this contribution.

Melinda Henning
Solutions for Supportive Homes
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 2:20 PM, Sandra Comstock <sandra@...> wrote:


If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Joseph Purkey
 

I'm so glad that was useful, Melinda! Yes, that part of design can be a low cost addition to a design, if done carefully. We did look at an aligned layout as well (like a scaled down city grid) as part of the initial design process, but it didn't gain us much in efficiency and all the stakeholders agreed that the loop layout was much more where they would prefer to live. Often every dollar is squeezed out of a development in an effort to be fiscally responsible, but those initial numbers are only the most immediate part of the equation, not necessarily the best value or the right solution for the end user. This one decision would have saved pennies at best to create a site with so much less soul. 

Sorry, I'm getting carried away and pontificating about my small part of the puzzle. I've really enjoyed learning from all the people on this list doing such great work! Thank you all for all the countless hours advocating for our neighbors!

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 | cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021, 8:11 PM Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:
Joe, thank you for introducing me/us to the concept of biophilic design, something many of us intuitively know - but you provided explanation, examples, and science that can help us effectively advocate. And I see elements in the photos of St. John’s Village that could easily, it seems, be integrated into other projects with some care. I so appreciate this contribution.

Melinda Henning
Solutions for Supportive Homes
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 2:20 PM, Sandra Comstock <sandra@...> wrote:


If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________