Date   

Re: Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

Mimi German
 

Suzanne! You are fabulous. I so love what you are doing. I'm going to put some of your actions on repeat for our village, Jason Barns Landing. Looking up your toilet from Amazon, now. Regarding you being on anyone's shit list, I'm on everybody's shit list. It's really just another way of saying you're doing the work, not talking about it.

With so much appreciation!
Mimi
St. Johns


On Mon, May 24, 2021 at 5:55 AM Suzanne Huffman <slhphd@...> wrote:

Good morning! Coming to you from West Salem, where I have been getting to know neighbors  camping ay Wallace Marine Park, 2 miles from my condo in a 55 plus golfing community. I’ve identified a core group who have skills and inclinations to form a makers co-op and have been taking art supplies to the park.

 

Last night I camped there with a couple of people I’ve gotten to know, came home in my Jetta Sportwagen, but left the SUV tent behind Today we will be constructing a façade over a 7x7x6 foot backpacking canopy. It will look like a tiny home. God willing, we will have the canister toilet delivered from Amazon today and have supplies to create a tiny sink for hygiene. If not, I have plenty of buckets, pool noodles cat liter and a Coleman picnic jug with a spout!

 

Tonight I will be Zooming into the Salem City Council meeting from Wallace Marine Village, asking them to suspend planned sweeps and allow us to develop a self-managed primitive campground, to open to the public on July 1. I used to do business incubation and have several micro-enterprise schemes, including constructing bamboo bikes, bike teardrop campers and boats from Wooden Widgets.

 

Honestly, I am on the “advocacy” community’s shit list for making public the contract and financials between the local CAT and the “Church” at the Park. See attached conversation with their former employee. C@TP  was incorporated and registered with SOS 8/18/2020 and issued essentially an open-ended sole-sourced contract for the current pallet shelter fiasco -- $225k for three months’ wages and benefits plus food service subbed (sole source again) Pastor DJ is working on the second emergency shelter and intends to build 6 more so there is one in each ward in Salem.

 

If anyone in this group would like to learn more, pitch in, help strategize  media and legal, etc.  visit… please call/text me at 503-875-5999 or if you do Facebook join our group Cascadian  Cooperative Arts.

 

FYI, through PPC Oregon I know Barbie at Hazelnut Grove and “Mo Edged” who was a founding member of Breitenbush Center. I’ll be reaching out to them today.

 

Attached, please find my testimony from two weeks ago. I have learned MUCH more since then. You will also find a chat conversation with the current moderator of Coalition of Advocates for Unsheltered of Salem, self-styled experts on homelessness in Salem. The mayor sends Gretchen Bennett, who coordinates homeless policy, along with human rights for the city.

 

Peace be with you!

 

Suzanne Lynn Huffman PhD

Counseling and Educational Psychology University of Memphis

Art Education and Special Education Memphis State University

 

Former Portland resident and communicant at Trinity Cathedral  

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick
Sent: Sunday, May 23, 2021 3:44 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

 

WW interviewed me, I wrote it up:

 

"The houseless vs the settlement: interview with Willamette Week".  

 

a field report from Portland's increasingly heated, fractious homelessness policy battles. https://tmccormick.medium.com/the-houseless-vs-the-settlement-interview-with-willamette-week-495f07b79d66

 

discussing, among others: 

County Commissioner Sharon Meieran, 

County Chair Deborah Kafoury 

PSU Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative director Dr. Marisa Zapata 

Homer Williams, founder of Oregon Harbor of Hope

Councilmember Dan Ryan.

 

Bcc:

Sophie Peel, Reporter, WW

Mark Zusman, Publisher WW

Aaron Mesh, Editor, WW 

Nigel Jaquiss, Reporter, WW

Rachel Monahan, Reporter, WW

Tess Riski, Reporter, WW

[note to WW staff or others receiving this email: you can reply to PDX Shelter Forum by using Reply to All or addressing to pdxshelterforum@groups.io].

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Re: Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

Suzanne Huffman
 

Good morning! Coming to you from West Salem, where I have been getting to know neighbors  camping ay Wallace Marine Park, 2 miles from my condo in a 55 plus golfing community. I’ve identified a core group who have skills and inclinations to form a makers co-op and have been taking art supplies to the park.

 

Last night I camped there with a couple of people I’ve gotten to know, came home in my Jetta Sportwagen, but left the SUV tent behind Today we will be constructing a façade over a 7x7x6 foot backpacking canopy. It will look like a tiny home. God willing, we will have the canister toilet delivered from Amazon today and have supplies to create a tiny sink for hygiene. If not, I have plenty of buckets, pool noodles cat liter and a Coleman picnic jug with a spout!

 

Tonight I will be Zooming into the Salem City Council meeting from Wallace Marine Village, asking them to suspend planned sweeps and allow us to develop a self-managed primitive campground, to open to the public on July 1. I used to do business incubation and have several micro-enterprise schemes, including constructing bamboo bikes, bike teardrop campers and boats from Wooden Widgets.

 

Honestly, I am on the “advocacy” community’s shit list for making public the contract and financials between the local CAT and the “Church” at the Park. See attached conversation with their former employee. C@TP  was incorporated and registered with SOS 8/18/2020 and issued essentially an open-ended sole-sourced contract for the current pallet shelter fiasco -- $225k for three months’ wages and benefits plus food service subbed (sole source again) Pastor DJ is working on the second emergency shelter and intends to build 6 more so there is one in each ward in Salem.

 

If anyone in this group would like to learn more, pitch in, help strategize  media and legal, etc.  visit… please call/text me at 503-875-5999 or if you do Facebook join our group Cascadian  Cooperative Arts.

 

FYI, through PPC Oregon I know Barbie at Hazelnut Grove and “Mo Edged” who was a founding member of Breitenbush Center. I’ll be reaching out to them today.

 

Attached, please find my testimony from two weeks ago. I have learned MUCH more since then. You will also find a chat conversation with the current moderator of Coalition of Advocates for Unsheltered of Salem, self-styled experts on homelessness in Salem. The mayor sends Gretchen Bennett, who coordinates homeless policy, along with human rights for the city.

 

Peace be with you!

 

Suzanne Lynn Huffman PhD

Counseling and Educational Psychology University of Memphis

Art Education and Special Education Memphis State University

 

Former Portland resident and communicant at Trinity Cathedral  

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick
Sent: Sunday, May 23, 2021 3:44 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

 

WW interviewed me, I wrote it up:

 

"The houseless vs the settlement: interview with Willamette Week".  

 

a field report from Portland's increasingly heated, fractious homelessness policy battles. https://tmccormick.medium.com/the-houseless-vs-the-settlement-interview-with-willamette-week-495f07b79d66

 

discussing, among others: 

County Commissioner Sharon Meieran, 

County Chair Deborah Kafoury 

PSU Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative director Dr. Marisa Zapata 

Homer Williams, founder of Oregon Harbor of Hope

Councilmember Dan Ryan.

 

Bcc:

Sophie Peel, Reporter, WW

Mark Zusman, Publisher WW

Aaron Mesh, Editor, WW 

Nigel Jaquiss, Reporter, WW

Rachel Monahan, Reporter, WW

Tess Riski, Reporter, WW

[note to WW staff or others receiving this email: you can reply to PDX Shelter Forum by using Reply to All or addressing to pdxshelterforum@groups.io].

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Re: Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

Aisha Musa
 

" sanctioned unused spaces all across the city for camping. Maybe each one gets a dumpster. And maybe they even buy hundreds of  cheap garden sheds. I'll be the first to admit this is not "good enough" in the long term and flawed in many ways. But it's also 100 times better than the current situation, right? "

You are right. It is better. But the other issue I think we have is the sheer number of housed people who only care about the unhoused because they consider them a nuisance. They simply want to be rid of them. Then there are those housed people who feel the unhoused somehow deserve what they are going through and blame them because of bad choices they think that they made. They would rather see them punished than helped.

Dr. Aisha Y. Musa
AYM Education and Consulting, LLC









On Sun, May 23, 2021 at 9:33 PM Emerson This <emersonthis@...> wrote:
Thanks for sharing this, Tim!

In that interview you touched on several things that I've been thinking/feeling for a long time! The main take-away for me is that the debate between "permanent" housing vs immediate remedies to the humanitarian crisis is a false dichotomy. We need BOTH! My sense is that the conversation has devolved into competing factions mostly because we know there's insufficient political will and/or funding to do both. In other words, there's no practical reason why we couldn't walk AND chew gum. Rather, we feel like we can't afford the gum and the walking shoes. Do we have to accept this constraint?

Obviously, the money has to come from somewhere. But it's frustrating and tragic that the options seem to have been reduced to expensive long-term "permanent" housing solutions or slightly-less-expensive short-term alternative shelters / villages. I don't have anything against either of those approaches. But I talk to unhoused people on a weekly basis, and they list the same urgent needs you mention in your interview. Folks repeatedly ask for the same super basic things: trash bags. Anywhere to stay dry and not get harassed. A way to prevent their stuff from getting stolen so they can leave their campsite to do... anything besides guard their stuff all day! These specific problems just aren't that complicated or expensive. I know because I've seen it with my own eyes. I've seen ordinary citizens take it on themselves to provide trash cans, upgrade tents to make them warmer and drier, provide places to secure stuff... etc. These kinds of things immediately improve the lives of unhoused people and their housed neighbors and they cost pennies. Of course, many of the folks on this forum already know all this. But I never hear anyone in City Hall talk like this. It seems like the politics of the moment (and tons of red tape) have made it suicideal to consider simple, imperfect, commonsense ideas.

I wonder what readers of this forum think? Do we have the stomach for admittedly imperfect, short-term solutions? For example, what if the city magically escaped the political gridlock and sanctioned unused spaces all across the city for camping. Maybe each one gets a dumpster. And maybe they even buy hundreds of  cheap garden sheds. I'll be the first to admit this is not "good enough" in the long term and flawed in many ways. But it's also 100 times better than the current situation, right? And it could literally be accomplished in days for less than the cost of a single fancy shelter or village. To be clear, I'm not claiming this is the solution. It's just a hypothetical example of the kinds of messy, imperfect ideas that I wish there was more space for.

On Sun, May 23, 2021 at 3:44 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
WW interviewed me, I wrote it up:

"The houseless vs the settlement: interview with Willamette Week".  

a field report from Portland's increasingly heated, fractious homelessness policy battles. https://tmccormick.medium.com/the-houseless-vs-the-settlement-interview-with-willamette-week-495f07b79d66

discussing, among others: 
County Commissioner Sharon Meieran, 
County Chair Deborah Kafoury 
PSU Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative director Dr. Marisa Zapata 
Homer Williams, founder of Oregon Harbor of Hope
Councilmember Dan Ryan.

Bcc:
Sophie Peel, Reporter, WW
Mark Zusman, Publisher WW
Aaron Mesh, Editor, WW 
Nigel Jaquiss, Reporter, WW
Rachel Monahan, Reporter, WW
Tess Riski, Reporter, WW
[note to WW staff or others receiving this email: you can reply to PDX Shelter Forum by using Reply to All or addressing to pdxshelterforum@groups.io].
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

Emerson This
 

Thanks for sharing this, Tim!

In that interview you touched on several things that I've been thinking/feeling for a long time! The main take-away for me is that the debate between "permanent" housing vs immediate remedies to the humanitarian crisis is a false dichotomy. We need BOTH! My sense is that the conversation has devolved into competing factions mostly because we know there's insufficient political will and/or funding to do both. In other words, there's no practical reason why we couldn't walk AND chew gum. Rather, we feel like we can't afford the gum and the walking shoes. Do we have to accept this constraint?

Obviously, the money has to come from somewhere. But it's frustrating and tragic that the options seem to have been reduced to expensive long-term "permanent" housing solutions or slightly-less-expensive short-term alternative shelters / villages. I don't have anything against either of those approaches. But I talk to unhoused people on a weekly basis, and they list the same urgent needs you mention in your interview. Folks repeatedly ask for the same super basic things: trash bags. Anywhere to stay dry and not get harassed. A way to prevent their stuff from getting stolen so they can leave their campsite to do... anything besides guard their stuff all day! These specific problems just aren't that complicated or expensive. I know because I've seen it with my own eyes. I've seen ordinary citizens take it on themselves to provide trash cans, upgrade tents to make them warmer and drier, provide places to secure stuff... etc. These kinds of things immediately improve the lives of unhoused people and their housed neighbors and they cost pennies. Of course, many of the folks on this forum already know all this. But I never hear anyone in City Hall talk like this. It seems like the politics of the moment (and tons of red tape) have made it suicideal to consider simple, imperfect, commonsense ideas.

I wonder what readers of this forum think? Do we have the stomach for admittedly imperfect, short-term solutions? For example, what if the city magically escaped the political gridlock and sanctioned unused spaces all across the city for camping. Maybe each one gets a dumpster. And maybe they even buy hundreds of  cheap garden sheds. I'll be the first to admit this is not "good enough" in the long term and flawed in many ways. But it's also 100 times better than the current situation, right? And it could literally be accomplished in days for less than the cost of a single fancy shelter or village. To be clear, I'm not claiming this is the solution. It's just a hypothetical example of the kinds of messy, imperfect ideas that I wish there was more space for.


On Sun, May 23, 2021 at 3:44 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
WW interviewed me, I wrote it up:

"The houseless vs the settlement: interview with Willamette Week".  

a field report from Portland's increasingly heated, fractious homelessness policy battles. https://tmccormick.medium.com/the-houseless-vs-the-settlement-interview-with-willamette-week-495f07b79d66

discussing, among others: 
County Commissioner Sharon Meieran, 
County Chair Deborah Kafoury 
PSU Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative director Dr. Marisa Zapata 
Homer Williams, founder of Oregon Harbor of Hope
Councilmember Dan Ryan.

Bcc:
Sophie Peel, Reporter, WW
Mark Zusman, Publisher WW
Aaron Mesh, Editor, WW 
Nigel Jaquiss, Reporter, WW
Rachel Monahan, Reporter, WW
Tess Riski, Reporter, WW
[note to WW staff or others receiving this email: you can reply to PDX Shelter Forum by using Reply to All or addressing to pdxshelterforum@groups.io].
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Interview with Willamette Week on PDX homelessness battles

Tim McCormick
 

WW interviewed me, I wrote it up:

"The houseless vs the settlement: interview with Willamette Week".  

a field report from Portland's increasingly heated, fractious homelessness policy battles. https://tmccormick.medium.com/the-houseless-vs-the-settlement-interview-with-willamette-week-495f07b79d66

discussing, among others: 
County Commissioner Sharon Meieran, 
County Chair Deborah Kafoury 
PSU Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative director Dr. Marisa Zapata 
Homer Williams, founder of Oregon Harbor of Hope
Councilmember Dan Ryan.

Bcc:
Sophie Peel, Reporter, WW
Mark Zusman, Publisher WW
Aaron Mesh, Editor, WW 
Nigel Jaquiss, Reporter, WW
Rachel Monahan, Reporter, WW
Tess Riski, Reporter, WW
[note to WW staff or others receiving this email: you can reply to PDX Shelter Forum by using Reply to All or addressing to pdxshelterforum@groups.io].
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Questions about new city policy toward homeless camps

Dave Brook
 

From OPB radio Think Out Loud interview with  Marisa Zapata, Director of the PSU Homeless Research Center. (20 min.)
https://www.spreaker.com/user/oregonpublicbroadcasting/new-rules-aimed-at-homeless-encampments-


Oregonian today: "Homelessness in downtown Portland? Poll results rank popular solutions"

Houseless First
 

Homelessness in downtown Portland? Poll results rank popular solutions offered by area residents

downtown portland

Tents line the sidewalk of a block in downtown Portland on Thurs., May 20, 2021. The OregonianThe Oregonian

Portland-area residents unhappy with city leaders’ response to homelessnessstrongly favor more frequent garbage pickup at downtown homeless camp sites but otherwise differ on what solutions should be used to remedy the situation, poll results show.

Increase trash pick-ups at camps where people are homeless live
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
85%
9%
Portland residents
90%
6%
Provide more portable toilets, outdoor showers and other sanitary services
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
68%
26%
Portland residents
79%
17%
Open a large congregate shelter for people who are homeless
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
75%
18%
Portland residents
81%
14%
Provide motel vouchers to people who are homeless
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
59%
33%
Portland residents
73%
24%
Allow more areas for people to camp or sleep in cars or RVs
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
41%
53%
Portland residents
53%
41%
Force campers to leave downtown
Support
Oppose
Metro-area residents
61%
30%
Portland residents
53%
42%

--------------

Residents of the city’s suburbs generally favor tougher treatment of people without homes of their own while those in Portland proper would far rather offer campers motel rooms than order them to vacate downtown.

Overall, Portland-area residents support a variety of immediate solutions ranging from adding more portable toilets to forcing campers to leave downtown. Setting aside more areas where people could safely camp or sleep in cars or RVs, however, was a no-go for many residents.

The findings come from a poll of 600 adults in Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas and Clark counties commissioned by The Oregonian|OregonLive about people’s perceptions of downtown Portland. The poll was conducted from April 30 to May 6. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

None of the people contacted to take part in the poll were experiencing homelessness. And while many of the poll-takers regularly or sometimes visit downtown, others reported never having visited downtown either before or after businesses closed down due to the pandemic. Nearly half of metrowide residents reported they have not come downtown at all since coronavirus arrived in Oregon and almost 30% more said they’ve visited just a few times.

Marisa Zapata, director of Portland State University’s Homelessness Research and Action Collaborative, questioned whether some of the solutions presented in the poll would truly help people experiencing homelessness or if they would simply help housed people feel more comfortable downtown because they wouldn’t have to see homelessness or its impacts.

“When we are thinking about what is helpful, it is very different to ask a housed person what helps someone who is unsheltered to live a better life when they have never lived unsheltered,” she said. “But it really gets more into answering the question of what you, as a taxpayer, would be willing to fund.”

TRASH REMOVAL

The poll showed 85% of Portlanders support increasing trash pickup at tent clusters downtown. Many individuals experiencing homelessness and advocates agree with this.

Sonny Smith, who was sweeping the area around the tent where he sleeps downtown on a recent Thursday, said “more trash pickup is needed downtown because garbage cans are always packed full.”

He said it would be easier to keep tent areas clean if nearby trash cans were emptied more frequently.

Kaia Sand, director of Street Roots, a homelessness advocacy and resource organization, said trash removal is not something that is tackled at an infrastructure level in Portland. Instead trash services are divided up piecemeal between nearly a dozen different agencies, though none sees the task as its top priority. And trash collection at encampments isn’t done on a consistent schedule.

“Both with garbage and hygiene services,it is interesting that we don’t have a full sanitation department,” she said. “Those are things we could look at in a big way.”

TOILETS, SHOWERS

The poll found 67% of residents support providing more portable toilets, showers and other sanitary services. Residents living in the city proper supported this solution more strongly than their suburban counterparts. It is also a resource that individuals experiencing homelessness have continued to say is a priority – not just increasing the number of toilets on the street, but increasing how often the city cleans them.

“It would be better if people could just use the many bathrooms downtown in actual buildings,” Zapata said. “However, porta-potties are not a bad choice, so (increasing the number of portable toilets) would be something that supports people who are homeless, but it will not solve homelessness.”

Additionally, Smith said while there are homeless services agencies downtown that offer showers, the resource isn’t something that is accessible daily since there is such a high demand for it.

MOTEL VOUCHERS

The poll showed 58% of residents support temporarily sheltering people in individual hotel rooms. Residents who live in the city supported this at a higher rate, 73%, than suburbanites at 53%.

Currently, the joint city-county homeless office is offering motel shelters to homeless individuals with a higher risk of experiencing severe symptoms or death from COVID-19 or to those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Zapata said the joint city-county office should provide additional motel vouchers to individuals experiencing homelessness – an expense that can be fully reimbursed by the federal government. At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, Zapata’s team conducted their own survey asking people experiencing homelessness where they would want to go since congregate shelters were limited due to pandemic social distancing precautions.

“The number one choice was a motel,” Zapata said. Solutions should be driven by the realities of people experiencing homelessness, she said.

SANCTIONED CAMPING SITES

The potential solution that drew the least support from poll participants was to open more alternative outdoor shelters such as sanctioned camp sites and safe parking lots for individuals to sleep in. In all, 53% opposed that option and just 41% supported it.

A man named Shane, who declined to provide his last name because he didn’t want his homeless experience to impact his job, said he sees a need for more sanctioned camping sites or tiny home villages.

downtown portland

A tent sits at the corner of 3rd Ave. and Main St. in downtown Portland on Thurs., May 20, 2021. The OregonianThe Oregonian

“Ideally, those would be program-oriented and help people set and reach goals while they are there,” he said.

Johnny Lee Robertson, who was formerly homeless but now lives in a subsidized apartment, said he often observed people pitching tents side by side to create a semblance of safety but living on the street wasn’t truly ever safe. He believes offering people sanctioned sites to camp would create a much safer environment.

City officials and advocates for unsheltered people are currently discussing options for more alternative shelter as they how to respond to one of the city’s largest homeless encampments currently located near Laurelhurst Park. Many of the campers at that site said they would be willing to move to a sanctioned camping village but not an large indoor shelter with shared sleeping and living space.

While the city does not currently have the resources to pop up new alternative shelters in the coming weeks, the joint city-county budget proposal includes $3 million to do so in the coming year.

FORCE CAMPERS OUT

The survey showed 61% of residents support the city forcing homeless individuals to leave downtown, with most of that support coming from residents living in the suburbs. Individuals experiencing homelessness and advocates do not support this, nor do court rulings suggest it would be legal for the city to do so.

“I am trying to exit the street,” said Smith, who lives in a tent downtown. “But I am trying to do it the right way and save up my money for a car. I think people should be allowed to sleep in tents if they are trying to save up their money because there’s no place else for me to go until I have enough saved.”

Shane added that many social services, including housing, behavioral health and food services, are clustered near the downtown area. Forcing people from downtown would make those services much harder to access for individuals experiencing homelessness who often don’t have a car or money for transportation.

Sand, of Street Roots, was dismayed that so many responders wished to push people out of downtown.

“Asking people to go into mass shelter or leave downtown definitely solves the fact that people don’t have to see that person who is homeless,” she said. “But that is all, it doesn’t actually help solve the real issue of housing.”

On Wednesday, city officials announced intentions to move more quickly to clean up, downsize or completely remove encampments throughout the city saying their more passive strategy was failing to keep the city clean from public health hazards. However, homeless individuals and advocates argued that is harmful policy for people living on the street.

CONGREGATE SHELTERS

The survey showed 75% of residents would support more congregate, indoor shelters opening. However, individuals experiencing homelessness overwhelming say they would prefer to live on the street, to access alternative shelter like sanctioned camping or tiny home villages or start the process to get in line for an apartment of their own.

Smith said he doesn’t feel comfortable sleeping at indoor shelters next to strangers. He said there is little privacy and his personal items have been stolen when he previously stayed at a shelter, which is why he prefers to live in a tent on his own.

“Mass shelter is simply just temporary shelter; it is not a solution,” Sand said. “Mass shelter does work for some people, though, which is good in the sense that we need many different resources to solve such a herculean problem, but it won’t end homelessness and we often hear that mass shelter isn’t right for many people.”

OTHER NEEDS

Additional solutions that participants of The Oregonian|OregonLive survey were not asked about include expanding affordable housing, providing more access to housing caseworkers and better access to health care.

Individuals experiencing homelessness who were surveyed by Zapata’s team with help from Street Roots found that people overwhelming reported stable housing as the top solution to their homelessness. Additionally, people reported they needed help connecting to those resources.

“One thing from our survey conducted last fall, was that people are looking to have more contact with outreach workers and mobile health teams,” Zapata said. “That to me is a really important investment. Having those relationships developed now so that people are more comfortable and willing and trusting to move into housing.”

Zapata said there is also a lack of mental health care workers serving the homeless.

“Over and over again people said they valued and needed those personal relationships, especially relationships that reflected their own culture,” she said. “So, when you say we can spend $100 on trash pickup or $100 on a meaningful connection, which do you choose?”

Nicole Hayden reports on homelessness for The Oregonian|OregonLive. She can be reached at nhayden@...or on Twitter @Nicole_A_Hayden

Today’s report is part of the ongoing series Downtown in Distress.



Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Emerson This
 

@Mimi I’m interested to know more about why you don’t think composting toilets would work. I have some experience with this and I was also skeptical at the outset but then very pleasantly surprised by the results. I don’t want to hijack this thread but I’m happy to talk more about this offline if you’re interested. 

I’ll say one last thing here, in case other folks are curious about composting toilets. They aren’t complicated and they aren’t gross at all! If done properly, no one ever interacts with sewage. They don’t even smell. (I didn’t believe this either but it’s true). I’m not sure if composting toilets will be “the” way of the future, but flush toilet are definitely the way of the past. Our days of shitting into precious drinking water are numbered...

On May 22, 2021, at 6:47 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


When we first had the toilets removed twice by Nick Fish, we talked about that. We only got as far as bringing in the buckets w/ the toilet seat in a tall tent. Shitting into bags was just not going to work for folks. They tried it and said no. We didn't go through with more detailed compost toilets. I don't think we can do that where we are located now, either. We need to bring in toilets and talk a contractor into cleaning them for us. We can probably buy the toilets. We just need a company to commit to cleaning them twice a week. We'll be looking into that this coming week.

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:38 AM Emerson This <emersonthis@...> wrote:
@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Mimi German
 

When we first had the toilets removed twice by Nick Fish, we talked about that. We only got as far as bringing in the buckets w/ the toilet seat in a tall tent. Shitting into bags was just not going to work for folks. They tried it and said no. We didn't go through with more detailed compost toilets. I don't think we can do that where we are located now, either. We need to bring in toilets and talk a contractor into cleaning them for us. We can probably buy the toilets. We just need a company to commit to cleaning them twice a week. We'll be looking into that this coming week.

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:38 AM Emerson This <emersonthis@...> wrote:
@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Emerson This
 

@Mimi Have you considered making composting toilets? They’re way less disgusting and we could build them ourselves. They still require a bit of upkeep but it’s not difficult. Let me know if you want to talk more about that. 

On May 21, 2021, at 6:22 AM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:


One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond


<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>


Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Mimi German
 

One more thing.

We filed a tort claim against Rabid Response for a sweep they conducted months ago. We will be filing lawsuits and/or tort claims for every sweep that goes down in St Johns. If there are any lawyers on this list, please come forward to help out. There is a lot to learn about the process of sweeps. We can teach you every single thing you need to know in order to win the lawsuits. My first wish is that the unhoused get housing and/or temp villages to live in, but my second wish is that people help the houseless sue the city and RR for each and every sweep.

Mimi
503-453-9005


On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 6:06 AM Mimi German via groups.io <mirgerman0000=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Mimi German
 

I'll be writing up what we're doing at Jason Barns Landing and will send it to Sharon Meieran and asking for her help to keep JBL where it is, at least until the trucks are absolutely ready to start their dig for the so-called new housing they'll be building in some far off unknown future. At that point, we can discuss moving if the build is, in fact, a build for low-income displaced BIPOC families who were gentrified out of the city. This latter piece is what they say the housing is allocated for, but so far, no proof of that has been shown to us. If that's truly the case, we will, in good faith, move the tarpee village when the trucks are scheduled to dig.

My partner and I remove the trash that is now hauled up to the corner of Oberlin so we can access it w/ our truck/trailer. Sarah Iannaorone has been facilitating donations that pay for the dump runs. We do the work for free, which is egregious since Rabid Response and Central City Concern are paid millions of dollars for actual trash removal, by which I do not mean, "people!" 

Speaking of Rabid Response and CCC, I was talking w/ one of our tarpee builders yesterday about how the public does NOT know that the toilets all over town that  have PR about them being a human right, are all filled to the brim with feces and are overflowing. These "toilets" are toxic bio hazard that should be removed, if not cleaned. The PR from Ted Wheeler is truly a full-on propaganda machine. And how do I know about the toilets? Because we actually talk to unhoused people daily, something Ted has never done in his life, at least meaningfully. And it's the same reason the city keeps throwing money at "shelters" instead of homes for unhoused people. How do some of us know that unhoused people don't want shelters for myriad reasons? Because we talk with them about what they want and what they need, how they are doing, what is actually happening re services or more like, services are just PR and never really show up.

The language used with this "new" PR campaign against the houseless reminds me of one thing as I am a Jewish queer activist. The language Wheeler and the City Council are using is from Mein Kampf ideology. Hitler wanted to "clean" the country/world of those whom he deemed beneath him, of those who were dirty, of those with whom the white elite should never have to see...ever. I am disgusted, freaked out, appalled and horrified by the language and actions against the houseless by the Council.

Things we need at JBL. We want to get toilets brought in. We'll pay for them if a contractor will bring them. The contractors (Sani Can, etc) were threatened by Nick Fish with loss of contracts if they put toilets at JBL again. Nick is dead now, but did he start a precedence w/ contractors only bringing toilets to "sanctioned/permitted" sites? I'd like to find out. I also sent a 2nd letter to the housing authority to talk with them about who we are at JBL and why we should be allowed to stay until the build. No response.  Clearly, they are just waiting for us to be swept.

Apologies for the meandering email. It's early and the only time I have to write. I'll be over at JBL today. If anyone wants to meet, come on by. We'll be working on Tarpee 5 next week. We have some adjustments to make on one of the tarpees today. We need more heavy duty trash bags if you want to bring anything...And water. Thanks to Tim for coming by yesterday.

Mimi
503-453-9005



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
So beautifully written, Jeff.

On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


FW: event "International Solutions to Homelessness" - Tues May 25 9-10:30am PDT, from USC HPRI

Tim McCormick
 

RSVP below to attend.  
Note this is an event from USC, if you have any issues contact pricecsi@..., I won't be able to help you. 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Homelessness Policy Research Institute <pricecsi@...>
Date: Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:23 AM
Subject: RSVP Today: "International Solutions to Homelessness," HPRI Virtual Research Symposium 5/25
HPRI Virtual Research Symposium:

"International Solutions to Homelessness"

Tuesday, May 25, 2021
9:00 - 10:30 am PDT
via Zoom

On Tuesday, May 25th, the Homelessness Policy Research Institute (HPRI) will host a Virtual Research Symposium to provide a space for researchers, policymakers and providers to learn about and discuss solutions to homelessness through an international lens.  
The program will include four brief presentations about a range of topics including: the first costing study of homelessness in South Africahomelessness prevention in Brazil, and an assessment of the landscape of homelessness and gaps in knowledge in both the U.K. and Continental Europe. To conclude, HPRI Director Gary Painter will moderate a panel with the presenters, including time for audience interaction and questions.
Presenters and Panelists:

Moderator:

For more information, visit the event page on our website here.
For questions about the Homelessness Policy Research Institute, please contact Elly Schoen at ebschoen@....
USC Price Center for Social Innovation | 635 Downey Way, VPD 207, Los Angeles, CA 90089-3331
Unsubscribe hpri.socialinnovation.usc.edu@...
Update Profile | Constant Contact Data Notice
Sent by pricecsi@... powered by
Trusted Email from Constant Contact - Try it FREE today.


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Elise Aymer
 

So beautifully written, Jeff.


On Thu, May 20, 2021, 9:59 PM Jeff Liddicoat, <outsideartsale@...> wrote:
Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Jeff Liddicoat
 

Speaking of impacts and impact reduction...
The fact is the homeless are practically saints when it comes to the environment and climate change. We have very little, we buy very little, even if we have a car we mostly use bikes or tri met. Bottom line the homeless have a very low carbon footprint.
If everyone had their carbon impacts down at the level of the homeless the human species would be much more likely to survive.
So yeah, some of the homeless do an inadequate job of keeping their garbage concealed from public view. But even then it’s lack of fair and equal public support that makes it an apparent problem. Why not extend public garbage removal for those who lack the ability to transport and remove solid waste. The fact is if it weren’t for a garbage pail on every corner downtown and an army of street cleaners plus the fleet of specialized trucks for street garbage the downtown core would be neck deep in McDonalds wrappers and Oregonian newspapers in about two weeks.
And yes what little trash is visible at homeless camps could be dealt with better. But consider what would happen if you were to see all the garbage produced by all the housed people - if it doesn’t make you sick to your stomach it should. Hiding it doesn’t make it go away - the giant plastic patches in the oceans should be proof enough of that.
Again the reality of negative impacts don’t indicate homeless people as guilty. When you see a pile of garbage next to a homeless encampment it’s usually not their garbage, instead for the most part it’s waste material the homeless have diverted from the waste stream of housed people - all in an attempt to squeeze some value out of the scraps that fall from the table of plenty to the poor down below.
 It’s the same the  world over. It is exactly the same haves that complain about and victimize the have nots. And so for impact reduction perhaps rather than sweeping the homeless, what we need to do is sweep away those who have a nasty, sickening, planet threatening, future destroying high carbon footprint.
Seriously, from City Hall to some shifty house in Lents get off our backs. And keep in mind when it comes to a street fight those who know the streets will eventually win. Why? Because we know where you live.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
(503) 482-3188
1227 S.E. Burnside
 Portland Oregon

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 4:49 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

-Joe


On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk.

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building.

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran:

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures.

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Oregon Emergency Rental (and Utility Assistance) is open

Diane Rivera
 



The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. 

This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state.

In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

 

https://www.oregonrentalassistance.org/

 

 


Diane Rivera, Career Advisor

Career Boost (for SNAP recipients)

Worksource Portland Metro - SE / SE Works

We MOVED, NEW ADDRESS:
6401 SE FOSTER ROAD 
PORTLAND, OR 97206
During COVID please send all mail to :
(PO BOX 86280, PORTLAND .OR 97286)

www.seworks.org

 

 

 

 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Tom Peck <tompecktorrence@...>
 

Please remove me from your mailing list.
I live in Eugene.
Thanks,
-Tom


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Sue Gemmell
 

Did anyone else look at these stats, pause, and think, “wait... we spent how much money to do what?” 

“Since launching in January 2019, the outreach team has provided housing referrals to just 4% of the 918 individuals they engaged with, according to outcome data that was last updated in March. The team also helped 27% of those they talked to receive identification, 13% sign up for the Oregon Health Plan and 4% be admitted to a substance abuse treatment center.“

Sue


Re: SWHRL meeting tonight to feature speakers on homelessness solutions used in LA and Philadelphia, 7-8:30 PM

Sally Bachman
 

Use this zoom link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8720

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: sarahbach@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:52am
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: SWHRL meeting tonight to feature speakers on homelessness solutions used in LA and Philadelphia, 7-8:30 PM

You don't need to live in the Southwest Hills Residential League (SWHRL) area to tune in to this meeting. All are welcome to join via zoom. -- Sincerely, Sally Bachman

 

Featuring:

Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis;

 

and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 

Details below:

 

 

https://mailchi.mp/dec056816c9f/come-to-our-neighborhood-meeting-april-6179729?e=590b354feb

 

 

SWHRL Neighborhood Meeting

 

Wednesday, May 19

7:00-8:30 pm

 

Featuring expert speakers from across the US on successful methods for addressing homelessness 

 

On Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87205573096?pwd=aWtYUXFPMFc3L2RTWjhTemptYkRudz09

 

We hope you can join us at the SWHRL members' meeting this Wednesday at 7:00 PM on Zoom. This is an important annual meeting to elect the Board and set the direction for the year ahead.

In addition, Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis; and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 
Please invite your neighbors. (If you are not yet a member but live or work in the SWHRL neighborhood, just send an email with your name and address to contact@....) We want to hear what YOU want from your neighborhood association!
 

We are looking for new Board members


Qualifications:

  • Membership in SWHRL
  • Passion for our neighborhood and city
  • Willingness to pitch in

If you are interested in serving or want more information, contact president@....
 

Hope to see you on the 19th!
 

PSA: Ride Connection invites you to check out its new Travel Options Tool at https://rideconnection.org/services/travel-options-tool to see what travel options serve your area and best suit your needs. 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Andrew Olshin
 

Peter
👍🏻

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 19, 2021, at 4:56 PM, Peter Finley Fry <peter@...> wrote:



We accept the lie that somehow humans are different and special.  Humans have enormously negative impacts on the ecology of the earth.  The goal of planning is to minimize and eliminate these impacts through providing sewer systems; landfills; homes; etc. that allow us to contain the pollution that each of us cause.

 

These impacts can be contained in a home or a camp site or within a person.  The problem is that things get political, loud, noisy, and harmful as individuals seek to dominate others and demand privaleged.  The reduction of impact is the reduction of impact on the earth not the precious sensibility of some perceived other rich undeserving selfish human.    

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry   AICP BS PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Purkey via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 4:49 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

This is very frustrating. What "Impact" is the Impact Reduction Team "Reducing"? It certainly seems like the priority is the comfort of the housed population to the detriment of the unhoused population, which then will exacerbate the very impacts they intend to reduce. If the focus could be on reducing the impact of homelessness on the homeless population there could be some positive movement. This new policy really feels like kowtowing to the political power base instead of truly serving the public, which makes the unanimous Mayor/Council statement all the more confusing. Am I missing where this will actually improve the situation?

 

-Joe

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:51 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

 

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



 

In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



 

Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



 

times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



 

times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



 

times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



 

times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



 

With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



 

Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."

 

 

 

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:

No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

 

Betsy Hammond

 

 

<Outlook-0n342wpx.png>

 

Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics

 

 

 

<AE1CEBAF34E74D589E9B7F70F8430199.png>

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 

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