Date   

Invite to join Housing Oregon conference Oct 4-8, Homelessness Track sessions

Tim McCormick
 

thanks to Brian Hoop, Executive Director of Housing Oregon, for passing on this free invitation to PDX Shelter Forum members to join this week's Housing Oregon conference, including access to recorded sessions to be posted later.  

You can join any of the specific homelessness-related sessions Brian has listed below, by using the Zoom links listed. 

To access other sessions, you should register for the conference, which by the way is co-organized as part of a larger national conference Resilient Communities: The National Forumuse the passcode HonoredGuest for free, scholarship, registration, supported by Meyer Memorial Trust. 

I call your attention particularly to this session: 

UNPACKING THE VILLAGE: NEW RESEARCH TOWARD BETTER ALTERNATIVE SHELTER

Friday, October 8
9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT

Join Zoom session:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83463103673?pwd=R2g4Qjg4UXgwVWJ2R2Z2bitBeFlldz09

PRESENTERS
 ·  Todd Ferry Senior Research Associate and Faculty Fellow, Center for Public Interest Design, Portland State University
 ·  Dr. Marisa Zapata Associate Professor of Land-Use Planning and Director of Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, Portland State University
 ·  Dr. Greg Townley Associate Professor of Community Psychology, Portland State University and Co-founder, Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, Portland State University

Bcc: 
Todd Ferry
Dr. Marisa Zapata
Dr. Greg Townley 
Brian Hoop

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Brian Hoop <brian@...>
Date: Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 4:03 PM
Subject: Invite to join Homelessness Track sessions - Housing Oregon conference - Oct 4-8
To: <tmccormick@...>

Tim - Feel free to share with your list. 

Brian  

This week is Housing Oregon’s Industry Support Conference, October 4-8. There are dozens of online sessions highlighting current issues and best practices addressing affordable multi-family rental housing, homelessness services and expanding access to homeownership for low-income residents across Oregon.

You are invited to access for FREE a few of the workshops which are part of the Homelessness track. You are also welcome to consider registering for the entire multi-state weeklong conference at Resilient Communities: The National Forum.  Registering gives you access to 80+ workshops from multiple state community development and affordable housing associations, like Housing Oregon, collaborating on this conference.

Below you will find workshop dates, times and Zoom meeting room links you can access for several of the Homelessness Track sessions.  To participate in other sessions, including the national sessions on Monday/Tuesday, you will need to register.

If you have questions, please contact conference organizer – brian@... or 503-475-6056.


EQUITABLE RESEARCH, EVALUATION, AND GOVERNANCE FOR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAMS

Wednesday, October 6

10:30 am - 11:30 am PDT

Join Zoom session:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88149900511?pwd=NWNwd1VBK2Q1QkZUdmNsbkhDR0RsZz09

What does it look like for homelessness research and evaluation practices to be centered on racial equity and people who have lived experience with homelessness? Researchers from Health Share of Oregon worked with Portland State University’s Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative and Providence CORE to answer this question. They will discuss their study focused on the Regional Supportive Housing Impact Fund, which addresses the growing need for permanent supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness with serious health care needs in the Portland metropolitan region. The findings and recommendations of this study provide actionable guidance for any organization seeking more equitable research, evaluation, and governance approaches for supportive housing and homelessness services.

PANELISTS

·         Dr. Marisa Zapata Associate Professor of Land-Use Planning and Director of Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, Portland State University

·         Alyssa Craigie Director of Health Systems Integration, Health Share of Oregon

·         L. Bentley Moses Program Manager, Center for Outcomes Research and Education


PATHWAYS TO STABILITY FOR PEOPLE EXPERIENCING IDD AND HOMELESSNESS

Thursday, October 7

 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm PDT

Join Zoom session:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86534370503?pwd=aEY0WmdvSEdzaElLUkJxZCtOWmcxZz09

This session will highlight the challenges and opportunities to securing stable housing for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Building off of EcoNorthwest's 2020 data study that revealed deep but still hidden unmet housing needs for this special population, three project sponsors will share how they are forging solutions for our neurodiverse neighbors in both urban and rural communities.

MODERATOR

·         Margaret Van Vliet Consultant, Trillium Advisors

 

PANELISTS

·         Terri Silvis, Ph.D CEO, Horizon Projects

·         Jennifer Knapp Executive Director, Community Vision

·         Bryce Bahler, LICSW Director, Transitional Community Treatment, Ryther

UNPACKING THE VILLAGE: NEW RESEARCH TOWARD BETTER ALTERNATIVE SHELTER

Friday, October 8

9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT

Join Zoom session:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83463103673?pwd=R2g4Qjg4UXgwVWJ2R2Z2bitBeFlldz09

The village model, which features non-congregate sleeping units and shared facilities, has emerged as a favorite alternative approach to providing shelter for houseless community members. Advocates argue that villages can be put in place quickly, use underutilized land, and offer common space for empowerment, healing, and community. Research at Portland State University’s Homelessness Research and Action Collaborative (HRAC) provides critical context for the practices and outcomes of the village model. Learn from members of the interdisciplinary team at HRAC who conducted this research. They'll share key lessons from a multi-year study, funded by Meyer Memorial Trust, that engaged a range of stakeholders, including villagers, village managers/support-specialists, village designers/architects, and neighbors. As interest in the village model grows both locally and nationally, this team aims to identify best practices for the creation of more impactful and equitable villages—practices that can also inform a range of other approaches to alternative shelter.

PRESENTERS

·         Todd Ferry Senior Research Associate and Faculty Fellow, Center for Public Interest Design, Portland State University

·         Dr. Marisa Zapata Associate Professor of Land-Use Planning and Director of Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, Portland State University

·         Dr. Greg Townley Associate Professor of Community Psychology, Portland State University and Co-founder, Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, Portland State University


Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley: New legislation championing affordable homeownership and ending homelessness

Friday, October 8

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm PDT

Join Zoom session:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84188314963?pwd=QUFiY2tRbkZ0Rlg5ZkdIaHpuc2hZdz09

Oregon's U.S. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley join us to explain new legislation they have introduced designed to address America’s crisis of housing availability and affordability by reducing the shortcomings of current housing policies and funding levels. After brief comments, the Senators’ policy staff will join for Q & A. Senator Ron Wyden’s DASH Act will make a generational investment to end childhood homelessness and tackle the housing affordability crisis by issuing Housing Choice Vouchers to all families with children; greatly increase the production of deeply affordable housing for families exiting homelessness and reform the Low Income Housing Tax Credit. Senator Merkley’s Affordable HOME Act will invest $40 billion per year in the National Housing Trust Fund; lower the cost of housing so everyone can afford a place to live; and build an emergency housing program to deploy resources during large-scale disasters like wildfires.

 

PRESENTERS

·         U.S. Senator Ron Wyden

·         U.S. Senator Jeff Merley

·         Madison Moskowitz  Domestic Economic Policy Advisor, Office of Senator Ron Wyden

·         Matthew Traylor  Housing Policy Advisor, Office of Senator Jeff Merkley


-- 
Brian Hoop
Housing Oregon
Executive Director
P: 503-475-6056 
PO Box 8427
Portland, OR 97207
Pronouns: He/Him/His

--
Tim McCormick
+1 503.334.1894.  Zoom personal room.
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative


Re: Gulf Coast (has almost) Ended Unsheltered Homelessness

Sue Gemmell
 

I've been reading about Community Solutions  and am impressed with their approach to getting to zero. 

--

Sue Gemmell (she/ella)

Online Communities and Knowledge Management

suegemmell.com


Gulf Coast (has almost) Ended Unsheltered Homelessness

Keith Wilson
 

Dear PDX Shelter Forum,

 

I hope this email finds everyone well and safe.

 

I visited Gulfport, MS, a few weeks ago at the direction of a friend who helped them reach functional zero homelessness using Built for Zero. Here is the brief on their process and challenges. I believe I shared my Rockford IL visit with you last year. They too have ended homelessness. Working with cities around the nation that have both ended and are struggling with homelessness to find ways to provide better outcomes for our unsheltered neighbors in Portland.

 

Be well,

Keith Wilson

 

“END UNSHELTERED HOMELESSNESS.” Mary Simons, Executive Director of Open Doors Homeless Coalition made this her goal and she and her team have NEARLY ACHIEVED IT.

 

A few weeks ago, Mary allowed me the privilege of spending a day with her in Gulfport, helping me understand that Portland’s challenge is not insurmountable.

 

Open Doors (like our Joint Office of Homeless Services) manages the homeless services for Mississippi’s Gulf Coast Region, a six-county area along the coast which includes the cities of Biloxi, Pascagoula, and Gulfport.

 

Open Doors journey to arrive on the cusp of ZERO homeless was so much steeper than what we face in Portland, even with our thousands of unsheltered souls living on our streets.

 

In 2005, the Gulf Coast awoke after the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina receded, with 50,000 homes destroyed. Everyone in their community was affected, the unhoused were both rich and poor. By the time FEMA left, three years later, they still had 600 unsheltered souls living on the streets and in the woods. Today, they have exactly 54 unsheltered homeless and are working with each, explaining to them, “we want to support you, what does that look like? But you can’t stay here.”

 

It hasn’t been easy. From 2008 to 2014, they were stuck at about 600 unsheltered souls in their community. They, like so many communities in the US, relied on a “Housing First” model, which focuses on quickly moving people experiencing homelessness into independent and permanent housing. With 100% of their emergency shelters destroyed and not rebuilt after the storm and with limited transitional housing, they really had no other choice. However, they simply did not have the personnel to provide outreach to everyone, every day, to match the needs with available resources.

 

In 2015, Mary turned for help to Community Solutions and decided to begin the process to become a Built for Zero community. Built for Zero communities know how many people are experiencing homelessness at any time. They know a lot more than that too. They know who each person is and what they need to get back into housing. They know the length of time each person has been homeless and what specific challenges are keeping them out of housing, like not having a driver’s license or birth certificate, for example.

 

They know all this with the help of something called a “By-Name list.”

 

The By-Name list isn’t just about collecting stats on each person experiencing homelessness. Taken together, the By-Name list, and the data it provides, give a view of homelessness across the entire community — and allows teams to work toward ending it.

 

“It’s hard work though…” After implementing Built for Zero and seeing immediate and steady reductions, unsheltered homeless on the Gulf Coast plateaued at 300 souls living outdoors in unsafe, unsanitary, and dangerous conditions. The By Name list had become a key resource but was incomplete. Mary didn’t have the staff to reach everyone, every day. She realized, “…you can’t do it alone.”

 

The answer came when literally a door opened, and Mary walked into a meeting with the mayor and police chief in Biloxi in 2018. The police were frustrated because of the hundreds of thousands of dollars in city funding that was related to police calls to issues related to unsheltered homeless that, oftentimes, ended in arrests (sounds familiar - 52% of arrests in Portland are homeless persons). Mary realized that the police were either going to be a roadblock or a SOLUTION. Her response, “how about if I save you some money?” She asked, and they agreed, to become PARTNERS. The chief assigned two officers to the Open Doors Program and those officers provided access to the entire department. Soon after, the other cities along the Gulf Coast did the same. They collectively began helping her complete the By Name list.

 

Interviewing many of the officers that were now calling her and her team directly, she found they “hated arresting the homeless.” She knew the officers were charged with doing something, she wanted to give them better options.

 

There is no magic 1, 2, 3 step process. Each interaction has a tailored response. For example, a Biloxi police officer was at a bus station when two individuals exited an arriving bus and seemed to be lost. He asked if he could help them. One of them said, “I am looking for the shelter.” He replied, “we don’t have a shelter.” They told him they were homeless in another state where authorities asked them where they would like to go. They said, “Biloxi,” were given bus tickets and were on their way.

 

The officer took the opportunity to become part of the solution. He immediately offered help and contacted Open Doors, who provided a hotel room for three days, contacted their family, and helped them get back home. The most striking point to me was that not only did the officer help these souls, but he also tracked down the person in the other state who purchased the bus tickets, calling to explain how unprofessional and inhumane their approach was to ship homeless to other towns. An extraordinary story about working together to connect people to their support groups where they can be housed.

 

Mary points out that “partnerships are hard to create but once gained, you can move fast.” With the police on board and helping, the number of unsheltered became less and less.

 

More partnerships followed. Next were hospitals that “discharged patient to shelter,” (again, there are no shelters) even one person with a newly amputated leg. Hospitals now, partnering with Open Doors, notify them days in advance if someone does not have housing. Additionally, there were 98 veterans in her homeless day center. Mary’s research found that most had completed their PTSD treatment at the VA hospital and were being “discharged to homelessness” from the program. The VA now shares as much non-confidential information as they can with Open Doors, informing her in advance of a patients release so her team can jump into action to find housing.

 

There is no end to the partnerships now. They extend to every part of the community: businesses, real estate agents, faith-based organizations, etc. Everyone wants to help with the By Name list, sharing with Open Doors, and BUILDING TRUST with their unsheltered homeless souls. That is the true genius of Open Doors and Built for Zero. Mary now knows everyone experiencing homelessness “By Name”, in real time.

 

That’s how you get from tens of thousands of homeless to 54.

 

Contrast this story with Portland, a city of wealth and beauty with many resources in our community standing ready to help: 175 fire fighters on duty at any moment, EMT’s, our new Portland Street Response, countless homeless services agencies and faith-based organizations providing shelter and meals, 95 plugged in neighborhood associations, thousands of Neighborhood Emergency Team members, and dozens upon dozens of community organizations helping in all corners of our city. Our police, who are on the front lines caring for our city, drive, or walk by our unsheltered souls each day and bear the brunt of an uncoordinated system. All these resources are disconnected while the quality of life for both the homed and homeless suffers. In the case of the homeless, on average every three days, a life is lost.

 

Many of us will say, “we have an affordable housing issue in Portland, we lack alternative shelter.” And that is exactly what I said to Mary because we have been conditioned in Portland to believe this. Mary immediately challenged me, “stop looking at the usual locations.” “Focus on solutions: develop a network of second chance landlords that will help with souls with damaged rental histories; if you need housing for sexual offenders, talk to them, where do others live?” The point she was making was that if you argue for your limitations, you become part of the problem. Keep in mind, “the goal is to END UNSHELTERED HOMELESSNESS. We can only focus on solutions.” There is no one size fits all solution and the solutions are as varied as the individual needs and situations.

 

When you focus on ending homelessness, not allowing the street to be a destination, ever, and engaging your whole community, you can move mountains and care for your neighbors - all of them. I believe, like Mary, we can end unsheltered homelessness in Portland. I often say, the “P” in Portland stands for PRIDE in our city. Perhaps we will end unsheltered homelessness when the “P” stands for PARTNERSHIP.

 


Oregonian podcast interview with homelessness reporter, Nicole Hayden

Sally Bachman
 

The Oregonian posted today a Beat Check interview with Nicole Hayden, the homelessness reporter.

Here's the Apple podcast version:

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beat-check-with-the-oregonian/id1483134030

I'm sure that Beat Check can be found on other platforms, too.

SB


Training Event #2 - Learn how to divert construction mock-ups

Julia Mollner
 

Hello All, 
I want to share an upcoming event hosted by City Repair and the Useful Waste Initiative. See below!

Unfulfilled Potential: Completing Construction Mock-ups and Diverting Waste
A free, online event diving into the process of diverting construction mock-ups.
All donations go to supporting current diversion efforts, community engagement, and construction skill training for those involved this summer 2021. 

UWI_Event2.jpg
Image: Albertina mock-up by Ankrom Mosian and Pence Construction.

Please share with anyone who may be interested! All are welcome. 


--
Julia L. Mollner  AIA, LEED GA, CSI
Fellow of Practice, PSU Center for Public Interest Design


Re: Programs in Dallas, TX

Keith Wilson
 

Tommy,

 

This is a real privilege to receive. You and your father were very gracious in sharing. I researched the lay of land after viewing the presentation and reading the linked story. Texas legislature is considering a bill to make homeless encampments illegal. Will create fines up to $500. At some point when they realize and admit that they are never going to get money out of a homeless person and the mounting administration costs and arrests pile up for unpaid citations, they will begin to address the root cause. The presentation and what they are doing in Dallas is a wonderful first step to helping to improve outcomes.

 

Best,

Keith

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser via groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 9, 2021 10:21 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Programs in Dallas, TX

 

Hi all. My Dad lives in Dallas, TX, and does a good deal of outreach/support work with housing unstable and houseless folks there. He shared this presentation with me (attached as PDF) that outlines the current programs they are funding to try and help on a number of fronts. While obviously not a bastion of progressive values, it looks as though they are doing some good things there in this area. I thought some in this group would find this interesting.

 

Not mentioned in this presentation, but apparently there is some sort of publicly-funded medical insurance program for houseless people there (though I haven’t been able to find more info on it yet), that many of the people he works with make good use of.

 

I do think the counts are a bit suspect here – they estimate around 4000 unhoused people in Dallas County, which has a population just under 3 million. But since they have 3+ months of 90+ degree temperatures there each year, perhaps the more visible threat to human lives drives a bit more priority on addressing some of these issues than what we have here. I don’t know whether the houseless community themselves is well represented in any of these groups…would be curious about the experience from those participating in the system.

 

Here’s a recent article from the local newspaper giving an overview of the programs as well: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/2021/06/23/north-texas-partnership-aims-to-provide-shelter-to-half-of-dallas-countys-homeless/

 

Cheers,

-Tommy

 


Re: 'Encampments' in Int'l Order of Odd Fellows & Biblical traditions

Tim McCormick
 

whoops meant to add these images of I.O.O.F. 'Encampment" iconography, on official medals (known as 'jewels') and a building plaque:



On Mon, Aug 9, 2021 at 1:20 PM Tim McCormick via groups.io <tmccormick=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
[travel diary post]: 
Encamping with the [International Order of] Odd Fellows, & "The Wrong Place for the Right People."

In every town I look out for or often seem to stumble across an I.O.O.F. building—International Order of Odd Fellows, inclusive fraternal organization formed early 18thC in UK, US offshoot 1819. Their buildings (often called 'lodges') are amazingly pervasive, though sometimes little-marked or repurposed. 

In Half Moon Bay here, on coast of San Francisco peninsula, this excellent place Cafe Society I'd picked out from afar to stop in at turned out to be, of course, the current iteration of coffee shop that has long been on ground floor of the IOOF building at 526 Main Street, home of Half Moon Bay Odd Fellows.


"Odd Fellows ensures no one is odd man out," says headline of 2017 Half Moon Bay Review  story about the branch here, known as Ocean View Lodge. https://www.hmbreview.com/news/odd-fellows-ensures-no-one-is-odd-man-out/article_b6e4da60-eaa0-11e7-9421-3b5f60770def.html. IOOF was also the first fraternal organization to admit women, since 1851.

Particularly interesting to me is the IOOF's 'Encampment' concept & iconography. An Encampment is a higher-level order within a lodge, for more senior & honored members. My sense is that the tent / encampment theme comes mainly from the Hebrew Bible (which, especially the Pentateuch ie Torah, is full of descriptions of camps, settlements, tents or temporary pavilions). 

It challenges conventional modern understanding, that a more honored and responsible 'Order' would be represented by an 'encampment.' Yet it expresses and preserves an ancient view, perhaps best known (in 'Western' world) today via the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament and offshoots: of life as a spiritual journey and accordingly, temporary settlements as, potentially, sanctified points and waystations. 

Incidentally, the name "Cafe Society" apparently is alluding to the trailblazing Cafe Society opened on Sheridan Square, Greenwich Village, NYC in 1938, a leading jazz and political club, and also the first to be fully racially integrated. It was advertised as "The Wrong Place for the Right People" by founder Barney Josephson. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caf%C3%A9_Society.


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


'Encampments' in Int'l Order of Odd Fellows & Biblical traditions

Tim McCormick
 

[travel diary post]: 
Encamping with the [International Order of] Odd Fellows, & "The Wrong Place for the Right People."

In every town I look out for or often seem to stumble across an I.O.O.F. building—International Order of Odd Fellows, inclusive fraternal organization formed early 18thC in UK, US offshoot 1819. Their buildings (often called 'lodges') are amazingly pervasive, though sometimes little-marked or repurposed. 

In Half Moon Bay here, on coast of San Francisco peninsula, this excellent place Cafe Society I'd picked out from afar to stop in at turned out to be, of course, the current iteration of coffee shop that has long been on ground floor of the IOOF building at 526 Main Street, home of Half Moon Bay Odd Fellows.


"Odd Fellows ensures no one is odd man out," says headline of 2017 Half Moon Bay Review  story about the branch here, known as Ocean View Lodge. https://www.hmbreview.com/news/odd-fellows-ensures-no-one-is-odd-man-out/article_b6e4da60-eaa0-11e7-9421-3b5f60770def.html. IOOF was also the first fraternal organization to admit women, since 1851.

Particularly interesting to me is the IOOF's 'Encampment' concept & iconography. An Encampment is a higher-level order within a lodge, for more senior & honored members. My sense is that the tent / encampment theme comes mainly from the Hebrew Bible (which, especially the Pentateuch ie Torah, is full of descriptions of camps, settlements, tents or temporary pavilions). 

It challenges conventional modern understanding, that a more honored and responsible 'Order' would be represented by an 'encampment.' Yet it expresses and preserves an ancient view, perhaps best known (in 'Western' world) today via the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament and offshoots: of life as a spiritual journey and accordingly, temporary settlements as, potentially, sanctified points and waystations. 

Incidentally, the name "Cafe Society" apparently is alluding to the trailblazing Cafe Society opened on Sheridan Square, Greenwich Village, NYC in 1938, a leading jazz and political club, and also the first to be fully racially integrated. It was advertised as "The Wrong Place for the Right People" by founder Barney Josephson. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caf%C3%A9_Society.


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Programs in Dallas, TX

Tommy Kiser
 

Hi all. My Dad lives in Dallas, TX, and does a good deal of outreach/support work with housing unstable and houseless folks there. He shared this presentation with me (attached as PDF) that outlines the current programs they are funding to try and help on a number of fronts. While obviously not a bastion of progressive values, it looks as though they are doing some good things there in this area. I thought some in this group would find this interesting.

 

Not mentioned in this presentation, but apparently there is some sort of publicly-funded medical insurance program for houseless people there (though I haven’t been able to find more info on it yet), that many of the people he works with make good use of.

 

I do think the counts are a bit suspect here – they estimate around 4000 unhoused people in Dallas County, which has a population just under 3 million. But since they have 3+ months of 90+ degree temperatures there each year, perhaps the more visible threat to human lives drives a bit more priority on addressing some of these issues than what we have here. I don’t know whether the houseless community themselves is well represented in any of these groups…would be curious about the experience from those participating in the system.

 

Here’s a recent article from the local newspaper giving an overview of the programs as well: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/2021/06/23/north-texas-partnership-aims-to-provide-shelter-to-half-of-dallas-countys-homeless/

 

Cheers,

-Tommy

 


Notification: Weds 3-5pm: A Home For Everyone - Coordinating Board @ Wed Aug 4, 2021 3pm - 5pm (PDT) (PDX Shelter Forum)

Tim McCormick
 

incidentally, I have been working on how best to manage & notify about relevant events listings like this, both recurring and one-off. Your feedback/suggestions are welcome on how it's working, or might better.

There is a PDX Shelter Forum google calendar; a note at the bottom of notifications such as the  one below says how to view it, and add it to your calendar if you want.

I'm aiming to set it up so events on calendar automatically send 1-2 notifications to everyone in list/group eg: one when first listed, and one perhaps the day before or day of event. But it's only part working; and, tell me if you think this is or isn't useful or what you'd like. 

Also, I'd like the streamline others suggesting & adding relevant events to calendar (perhaps also deadlines, eg to apply for something, submit testimony).
thanks, Tim

---------- Forwarded message ----
From: Google Calendar <calendar-notification@...>
Date: Wed, Aug 4, 2021 at 1:00 PM
Subject: Notification: Weds 3-5pm: A Home For Everyone - Coordinating Board @ Wed Aug 4, 2021 3pm - 5pm (PDT) (PDX Shelter Forum)
To: Portland Shelter Forum <pdxshelterforum@...>


Weds 3-5pm: A Home For Everyone - Coordinating Board

When
Wed Aug 4, 2021 3pm – 5pm Pacific Time - Los Angeles
Where
get Zoom link at http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board -> mtg date -> "meeting aenda" (map)
Calendar
PDX Shelter Forum
Who
(Guest list has been hidden at organizer's request)
HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link
1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board
2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"
3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 
4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 

April 7 agenda: 
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/6065f656abf34c7826ecd3c5/1617294935519/CB_Agenda_20210407.pdf.

HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT
Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.

"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 

[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 

BACKGROUND
A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 

See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

Going (pdxshelterforum@...)?   Yes - Maybe - No    more options »

Invitation from Google Calendar

You are receiving this email at the account pdxshelterforum@... because you set a notification for this event on the calendar PDX Shelter Forum.

You can change your notifications for specific events in the event details page in https://calendar.google.com/calendar/.

Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to send a response to the organizer and be added to the guest list, or invite others regardless of their own invitation status, or to modify your RSVP. Learn More.

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Article: Shipping containers used to build LA housing complex for the homeless

Tim McCormick
 

about this project Hilda Solis First Care Village, LA, I and an interesting group are presently discussing on Twitter, please see thread at:
Particularly I'd like to invite views of anyone currently or formerly or near houseless, or who has lived in housing alternatives such as 'microunits' or trailers. We have activist @homeless_new (NYC) on and I've copied a number of other houseless folk I know of.

I'm in Bay Area currently and likely to go to LA this month, Solis Care Village is one place I'd particularly like to visit, among the many field-research places of great interest in area. 

----
Mark Hogan @markasaurus wrote:
"Using the numbers in the article this container project cost almost $900/SF to build and people are living in rooms only slightly wider than the length of a bed"

Tim McCormick @tmccormick wrote (replying):
"remarkable Hilda L Solis Care First Village for houseless, 232 apts + services bldg, $48M = $207k/apt, on public parking lot, done in 5 mos. 
Architects: @NACLosAngeles; builders @BernardsBrosInc  @VESTAmodular.
c/@HildaSolis #SolisCareFirstVillage #HSCFV"

[...]



On Thu, Jul 29, 2021 at 6:00 PM Charlotte <victorygardensforall@...> wrote:
has anyone calculated the cost per unit here.

On Thu, Jul 29, 2021 at 5:25 PM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
American firms NAC Architecture and Bernards have used shipping containers to form private apartments in a Los Angeles facility for people experiencing homelessness. The Hilda L Solis Care First …

View the article.
https://flip.it/7zF968

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/lfCXMO

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 



--
At the moment of commitment the entire universe conspires to assist you. Whatever you can do or dream you can do begin it now. Boldness has genius, magic and power in it. Goethe
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  Buckminster Fuller

Charlotte 001  787-366-9344, 541 579 8607 


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Increased Houselessness As Federal Eviction Moratorium Ends?

Brian Hoop
 

Following up on Elise's note about expiration of the federal eviction moratorium... The National Low Income Housing Coalition has asked for people and organizations within Representative Kurt Schrader's district to contact him today to support a vote that may take place soon to extend the federal eviction moratorium.   Here is the district map - https://www.congress.gov/member/district/kurt-schrader/S001180?r=404
Ideal for people living in Clackamas County Oregon City, Milwaukie, Lake Oswego, West Linn, Gladstone, Happy Valley, Wilsonville, etc.

Below is suggested message 
Brian

Please email and/or call  Representative Schrader's office ASAP on Friday - Sample message below - 
DC office - 202-225-5711 - simply leave message in bold below
Email Representative Schrader's appropriate staff:
Simone Auger - Housing advisor, legislative assistant - simone.auger@...
Kelly Nickel - Legislative Director - kelly.nickel@...


Subject line:  Support legislation TODAY to extend federal eviction moratorium issued by CDC which is expiring

Simone and Kelly - 

Introduction - your name, organization, and brief description if appropriate.

I urge Representative Schrader to support legislation to extend the federal eviction moratorium issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is set to expire this weekend. Without this protection, the 6.5 million renter households currently behind on their rent will be at heightened risk of losing their homes – and with them, their ability to keep themselves and their families safe. 

Given the growing danger of the coronavirus Delta variant and the significant health and safety risks it poses, Congress should immediately extend the federal eviction moratorium issued by the CDC until vaccination rates increase in the lowest-income and most marginalized communities that face the greatest risk of eviction. The eviction moratorium extends vital protections to renters at risk of eviction during the pandemic, and by doing so, it has helped keep stably housed millions of people who otherwise would have been evicted.

Evictions put lives at risk and strain our already overstretched public health systems. In fact, research shows that evictions occurring between the beginning of the pandemic and the issuance of the CDC moratorium in September led to more than 400,000 additional COVID-19 cases and nearly 11,000 additional deaths.

The emergence of the Delta variant necessitates a further extension of the CDC eviction moratorium to contain the spread of the deadly disease. As stated by CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky on July 22, 2021, “the Delta variant is more aggressive and much more transmissible than previously circulating strains. It is one of the most infectious respiratory viruses we know of, and that I have seen in my 20-year career.”

Sincerely,  YOUR NAME
-- 
Brian Hoop
Housing Oregon
Executive Director
P: 503-475-6056 
PO Box 8427
Portland, OR 97207

Pronouns: He/Him/His


On Fri, Jul 30, 2021 at 12:22 PM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
" On Thursday, the White House confirmed it would let the moratorium expire because the supreme court said it would block additional extensions unless they were authorized by Congress. "
Source: The Guardian article linked to below

Apparently, some legislators in the US House of Representatives are crafting a bill that would extend the federal eviction moratorium urged on by the Biden administration. 

Note that Oregon's eviction moratorium ended June 30th and not everyone qualified for Federal protection. 

My understanding is that in Multnomah County renters (thanks to a vote by County Commissioners) have an additional 90 days from the end of the Oregon moratorium during which they are still protected from eviction. There was a similar grace period affected at the state level. 

For homeowners, many who have also been struggling to make payments and therefore stay housed, Gov. Kate Brown also signed legislation to extend the mortgage foreclosure moratorium until September. 

What will happen after?

Without an extension the Federal moratorium ends tomorrow, leaving millions of Americans behind on their rent and unable to pay or to find other lodgings (if they have orders filed against them). State emergency rental assistance programs don't seem able to keep up and some landlords won't accept the funds from the programs.

What will happen to these millions of people? Already homelessness isn't being properly addressed. And then of course, more people entering shelters now (if there are spaces) will probably mean increasing rates of COVID-19, with the Delta variant being as transmissible as chicken pox.

On this subject:



Increased Houselessness As Federal Eviction Moratorium Ends?

Elise Aymer
 

" On Thursday, the White House confirmed it would let the moratorium expire because the supreme court said it would block additional extensions unless they were authorized by Congress. "
Source: The Guardian article linked to below

Apparently, some legislators in the US House of Representatives are crafting a bill that would extend the federal eviction moratorium urged on by the Biden administration. 

Note that Oregon's eviction moratorium ended June 30th and not everyone qualified for Federal protection. 

My understanding is that in Multnomah County renters (thanks to a vote by County Commissioners) have an additional 90 days from the end of the Oregon moratorium during which they are still protected from eviction. There was a similar grace period affected at the state level. 

For homeowners, many who have also been struggling to make payments and therefore stay housed, Gov. Kate Brown also signed legislation to extend the mortgage foreclosure moratorium until September. 

What will happen after?

Without an extension the Federal moratorium ends tomorrow, leaving millions of Americans behind on their rent and unable to pay or to find other lodgings (if they have orders filed against them). State emergency rental assistance programs don't seem able to keep up and some landlords won't accept the funds from the programs.

What will happen to these millions of people? Already homelessness isn't being properly addressed. And then of course, more people entering shelters now (if there are spaces) will probably mean increasing rates of COVID-19, with the Delta variant being as transmissible as chicken pox.

On this subject:



Unhoused Bill of Rights - US House of Representatives

Elise Aymer
 

US Congressperson Coi Bush (D-Missouri) has put forward a bill in the House of Representatives aimed at addressing homelessness and the issues of the unhoused. She herself has been unhoused.

I am linking here to her press release as it seems to provide a greater breakdown of the bill than the news articles on it I've read as well as a link (if you scroll down) to the actual text: https://bush.house.gov/media/press-releases/congresswoman-cori-bush-introduces-unhoused-bill-rights-first-ever-federal

It's positive to see a Congress member put a bill like this forward at this time when COVID-19 supports are ending, the eviction moratorium is ending, etc. (I have not read it closely so I don't have an assessment of its merits yet). I just have not seen much other attention at the federal level to homelessness, poverty and affordability. It is seeming like many are okay to return to business as usual.

I wish I could be more hopeful about its adoption. Given what the Senate looks like, I would think that Bush's bill may pass the House and then get no further.

Elise







Re: Article: Shipping containers used to build LA housing complex for the homeless

Charlotte
 

has anyone calculated the cost per unit here.

On Thu, Jul 29, 2021 at 5:25 PM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
American firms NAC Architecture and Bernards have used shipping containers to form private apartments in a Los Angeles facility for people experiencing homelessness. The Hilda L Solis Care First …

View the article.
https://flip.it/7zF968

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/lfCXMO

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 



--
At the moment of commitment the entire universe conspires to assist you. Whatever you can do or dream you can do begin it now. Boldness has genius, magic and power in it. Goethe
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  Buckminster Fuller

Charlotte 001  787-366-9344, 541 579 8607 



Article: Shipping containers used to build LA housing complex for the homeless

Angie Gilbert
 

American firms NAC Architecture and Bernards have used shipping containers to form private apartments in a Los Angeles facility for people experiencing homelessness. The Hilda L Solis Care First …

View the article.
https://flip.it/7zF968

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/lfCXMO

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 


Re: Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times

Charlotte
 

hello amalie and oher housing folks.    i do ot have connections in portland to work with people there.  i am wanting to work in eugene.

i put this on this forum as i thought others might tell me of similar programs and i would learn more.  maybe someone is already doing something like this.   and also i think this is a great idea.

square one village here in eugene s is building small permanent units in their c street complex for what sounds like 70,000.  

i wonder if we can get these numbers down on permanent housing.  (below 70,000 for 1 bedroom unit.  

i was hoping to get my foot in the door so to speak by helping the people who need to repair their homes, if they are interested to supply the money to do this by somehow working with transition housing on their homes, as well as permanent housing.

part of my vision is to some of the building with some of the homeless.  i personally have been homeless for 20 years.  i choose to not  be involved in the rat race, rather wanting to make a contribution to the community i live in as well as to solve problems such as climate change.  i am sure there are jobs where i could get paid for these.  i also do not want to be in the bureaucracy.  i want to be on the creative edge.  i am remembering a friend telling me about some place in the u.s. where the homeless were involved in many different  ways to make money while enjoying their work.

On Wed, Jul 28, 2021 at 12:15 PM Charlotte via groups.io <victorygardensforall=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Amalie can you call me 787 366 9355

On Wed, Jul 28, 2021, 11:45 AM Amalie Roberts <amalie@...> wrote:
Hello Charlotte, 

I am a member of the pdxshelterforum group and saw your recent post. We have an outreach and community food operation in PDX and assist people with navigating housing issues among others.   

I have a friend who is in a hard situation here in Multnomah County.  Due to a reshuffling of life in the past couple years,  she is now moving to a dilapidated place on a property that her elderly father, who is in a rest home now, may be part owner of though that is not clear.  She has been marginally housed for a few years now, is a middle  aged female, and not able to handle employment.  The property has a well and a compostable toilet but soon it will be winter and accessing those services will be difficult.  

She is such a wonderful person and an amazing artist.  The slope is becoming evermore slippery as she goes along so if you have any ideas or references for her in regards to accessing assistance for her new living space, that would be a god send. 

Thanks for your good works!


Amalie Roberts
amalie@...


 You have the
right to breathe and remain
 Imagine
that
Rosamond S. King

On Jul 27, 2021, at 5:01 PM, Charlotte via groups.io <victorygardensforall@...> wrote:

REBUILD SEVERELY DAMAGED HOUSE (fire) AND LOTS MORE

we are looking for a house to rebuild. when i was in minneapolis i remodeled many damaged houses. our intention here is to rebuild for a lot less. houses are very expensive because the unified building code has a lot of expensive ways to build. it looks like people wanting to make money have used the codes to further their money making desires. one thing that is needed for a healthy capitalism is that all sides are involved. we would like to bring more innovation and less cost into the picture.

i removed buildings for about 5 years in Minneapolis in the 90's. we used many less expensive ways to rebuild. when the building inspectors did not agree, we had a structural engineer describe how it could work. normally this might cost now 10 - 20 K. this depends on what the structural engineer costs. at time time i had a structural engineer friend who was happy to help, as he loved the mothods we were using. we have leads on at least one structural engineer who can help us.

there are some interesting applications of this. right now square one has built 6 houses on one urban lot in line with new state wide building codes. if there are people who have not been able to afford getting homes fixed we can offer them ways to do this where they do not pay. (one way being to use part of their lot for more houses. there are other ways as well.

contact me if you want to know more about any of the above.

a

we believe this is important work for these times, as the cost of building to the unified building code contributes in a a major way to homelessness. rob bolman many years ago built himself a straw bale house, using engineers to show how it would work. now there are almost 30 stawbale houses in eugene.

we would like to find a damaged house that needs repairs ideally in eugene proper. if you know of anyone with such a house, please message me.

new codes allow 6 low income houses on a city lot. we would look at building more units on the lot. see square one units in springfield on their web site. i am hoping for some kind of combination of transition housing and permanent housing. i think it is possible to build a permanet house in the nighborhood of 70,000 for 600 to 800 sq. feet. we need to look at these kind of solutions.

this is a good time to find these people as many people cannot afford extensive repairs because of the very high lumbar prices. it is great for low income folks as it might save 50 - 100 K.

o

t

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 4:36 PM Sally Bachman <Sarahbach@...> wrote:
FYI

 

Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland
Wednesday: A homeless couple went from a tent to a trailer, but continues to wait after more than a year for something more permanent.
By Brett Simpson
July 14, 2021

 

Good morning.
When Kymberli Wilson opens her eyes in the morning, the sight of a solid roof still disorients her.
She and her husband, Lenton, live in a 20-foot trailer at the Coliseum Stadium parking lot in Oakland. Home used to be a tent at the 77th Street homeless encampment, where they had to fill two jugs of water daily and dodge rats at night.
“It’s a big step up from the sidewalk,” Kymberli, 56, said. “No leaks, no wind, and we’re never cold.”
Kymberli and Lenton, 61, arrived at the city-run trailer site last May. But they never expected to stay. In a time of increased investment in helping the homeless, the trailer was offered as a pathway to permanent housing. And this year, a real home seemed within reach for the couple.
In January, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $1.75 billion of new investment in housing, and in March, President Biden’s American Rescue Act passed with $50 billion in housing and homelessness assistance.
But more than a year after arriving at a stadium parking lot that was meant to be temporary, the Wilsons remain in the trailer, and feel no closer to finding permanent housing and leaving life on the streets behind.
A broken-down Cadillac near the tent where the Wilsons had been living, before they moved to a trailer. Credit...Jared R. Stapp
The Wilsons are two of the approximately 2,000 homeless seniors in Alameda County. Some have gotten lucky with long-term leases on apartments, group homes and hotel rooms. But the Wilsons’ odyssey through a year of hope and disappointment points to a more persistent crisis for the homeless population that has evaded solutions, despite a significant injection of pandemic-relief money.
“I don’t worry about a virus,” Kymberli Wilson said. “It will be false hope that gets us in the end.”
A little more than a year ago, the Wilsons’ tent-home in Oakland at the 77th Street homeless encampment had no solid walls. At the end of a line of tents, under the overpass of the Coliseum BART station, the structure was unmistakable: a sprawling patchwork of blue tarp, gray nylon and red duct tape stretched over wooden beams. Other homeless residents there called it “the mansion.”
Outside, bikes, lawn mowers and construction tools were sprawled everywhere. Inside, there was a kitchen table, a full-size bed and a dresser full of clothes.
It was all that remained of the couple’s old life. In 2014, both left their jobs at the nearby Oakland Arena — she was a cashier, he was a parking attendant — to care for her father. When her father died in 2015, she and her husband were evicted from her father’s house. They spent a year in a parking lot behind a Church’s Chicken, then moved to the encampment.
They started a landscaping business, pulling their gear on a trailer behind a mint green cruiser bicycle as they rode across the city to tend lawns and dreamed of saving enough to escape. Last year, as Covid-19 swept across the state, the pandemic brought fear and uncertainty but also something unexpected: opportunity.
One morning last year in mid-April, the encampment leader showed up at the Wilsons’ tent with news: Oakland was receiving 67 fully furnished and state-financed trailers from the state’s Office of Emergency Services to house homeless people during the pandemic. Because of their ages, the Wilsons were eligible.
The trailer community at the Oakland parking lot where the Wilsons live.Credit...Jared R. Stapp
A trailer meant running water and electricity. It meant no more trips across the BART tracks to fill five-gallon jugs with water. And no more noisy generator consuming gallons of costly gas every day. But the Wilsons were hesitant. The trailer was smaller than their tent, with less storage space. And there was no sense of how long they could stay after the pandemic.
“Our tent is all we have,” Kymberli said that night in April. “If we leave, we can never come back.”
Then they heard from a former neighbor that Operation HomeBase, a new city program to help Oakland’s oldest and most vulnerable homeless residents, wouldn’t just provide a trailer, but would also provide a case worker to help them find permanent housing. The couple talked it over, eating Panda Express on the queen-size bed in the so-called mansion. And they decided to take the risk.
“We’re not getting any younger,” Kymberli said at the time. “Every choice we make is to get back inside.”
So on May 28, the Wilsons loaded the possessions they could fit onto their bike trailer — mowers, food, clothes, shoes — and traversed the overpass to a parking lot on Hegenberger Road. They filled out forms, received keys to Unit 46 and walked inside. What they saw stunned them: an open interior, filled with light from six windows. Gleaming brown cabinets, an upholstered couch, a bed and a kitchen table. Air-conditioning, Wi-Fi and an indoor bathroom.
Outside, an awning unfolded with the push of a button. And a community building offered free on-site meals, laundry service and medical support to all residents. As soon as the Wilsons dropped off their belongings, they took celebratory showers.
As the summer faded into the fall, they adjusted. They stopped expecting the sound of rats at night. They got used to using the bathroom without going outside. Three times a day, they got in line with the other residents and enjoyed a free meal — compliments of local restaurants. The Sunday brunch was their favorite: eggs, sausages, hash browns and Danishes. They began to gain weight.
But a promised case worker, who was supposed to help them transition to a home, never materialized. In January, the Wilsons took matters into their own hands. They applied for spots in public and private housing programs. Time and again, they failed to win the housing lottery. They are now on four waiting lists.

 

Kymberli and Lenton Wilson outside of the tent where they were living last year.Credit...Jared R. Stapp
Marichelle Alcantara, homeless programs manager for Operation HomeBase, said only one case worker served all 124 of the site’s residents for the first year of the operation. In May, the site hired three more case workers. But the Wilsons, both healthy and without dependents, have not reached the top of the priority list.
“Honestly, we expected people to arrive with their own case workers,” Alcantara said in April. “We were overwhelmed by the demand for support.”
In late April, the city announced that Operation HomeBase would be extended for another year. All residents can continue living at the Hegenberger Road site until 2022.
But the Wilsons feel stuck.
They cannot move forward, and they cannot go back to the tent. Their old “mansion” still sits under the BART overpass, but it is now occupied. Everything the Wilsons left behind there has long since been claimed. Their former friends and neighbors have mostly scattered to state-sponsored hotel rooms under Project Roomkey, another program that started during the pandemic.
“We want a house key. We want to pay rent,” Kymberli said. “We never thought we’d have to wait this long.”
Brett Simpson writes for the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley, Graduate School of Journalism.

 





--
At the moment of commitment the entire universe conspires to assist you. Whatever you can do or dream you can do begin it now. Boldness has genius, magic and power in it. Goethe
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  Buckminster Fuller

Charlotte 001  787-366-9344, 541 579 8607 



Amalie Roberts
amalie@...


 You have the
right to breathe and remain
 Imagine
that
Rosamond S. King



--
At the moment of commitment the entire universe conspires to assist you. Whatever you can do or dream you can do begin it now. Boldness has genius, magic and power in it. Goethe
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”  Buckminster Fuller

Charlotte 001  787-366-9344, 541 579 8607 



Re: Apologies to Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times

Trena Sutton
 

Please do not apologize, what you had to say was not only relative to this form but it was interesting to read. I'm a big supporter of Bybee Lake Hope Center and I'm thrilled you communicated with Richelle who oversees voluntary programs. She is a dynamic person.

 I'm currently working with homeless veterans in Central Oregon. We just broke ground for a 15 tiny home project in Bend. You don't see the homeless camps like you do in Portland and surrounding areas. Central Oregon has a great deal of open space but unfortunately much of the land is owned by the county or the US Forest Service and they are not terribly hospitable towards those living Outdoors. The faith-based community in Central Oregon has really stepped up to help but the house was have become a bit xenophobic because of the hostilities directed towards them from the local constabulary.

On Wed, Jul 28, 2021, 9:46 PM Mh Kincaid <jamasu88@...> wrote:
I apologize for my error in replying to an email sent by a member of this group. I had no idea it would go the whole group.  
Humility is at work in my world...

Maryhelen Kincaid


From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> on behalf of Mh Kincaid <jamasu88@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 8:41 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times
 
I am working/spending time in the garden, and trying to not pay attention to all the proposed actions that get lofted in these groups.  I am spending a good deal of time working on the Vanport Placemarking Project,  We got our first sign installed on June 30th and 2 more should be installed at the Vanport theater site by the end of August.  I attached a picture of the first sign. We had a booth at the Rose Cup Races July 9-11th and had a lot of good conversations with people about their knowledge, or lack of knowledge, about Vanport. Besides the heat it was a really good opportunity to connect with a different demographic.

I contacted Raven at Bybee Lakes, about getting donated pastries and bread from Marsee Bakery Outlet and she put me in touch with Richelle.  I am going to Marsee tomorrow to see what I can get donated.

I will forward you an email I sent to Dan Ryan.  There are North Portland folks all up in arms over the list of 70 sites.  Mostly complaining, and wanting citizens and neighborhoods to pick the usable sites. My belief is whoever has the money will decide, so "we" should focus on providing a plan and a way for "them" to spend thei money.  

I am glad you are having fun with your kids and grandkids.  I am not sure I could take "nonstop" but know it is really rewarding and you are making lots of memories.

Get in touch when you have time, and are rested...

Maryhelen
 


From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> on behalf of Janice Yaden via groups.io <janiceyaden=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 12:57 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times
 
I read this.  Still unanswered questions, as usual in a news article.  Anyhow, another look at homelessness.  
What are you doing these days?  Our kids are here with their kids and we are non-stop activity center.
Janice

On Tuesday, July 27, 2021, 04:36:55 PM PDT, Sally Bachman <sarahbach@...> wrote:


FYI

 

Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland

Wednesday: A homeless couple went from a tent to a trailer, but continues to wait after more than a year for something more permanent.

By Brett Simpson

July 14, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/14/us/oakland-homeless-housing.html?searchResultPosition=1

 

Good morning.

When Kymberli Wilson opens her eyes in the morning, the sight of a solid roof still disorients her.

She and her husband, Lenton, live in a 20-foot trailer at the Coliseum Stadium parking lot in Oakland. Home used to be a tent at the 77th Street homeless encampment, where they had to fill two jugs of water daily and dodge rats at night.

“It’s a big step up from the sidewalk,” Kymberli, 56, said. “No leaks, no wind, and we’re never cold.”

Kymberli and Lenton, 61, arrived at the city-run trailer site last May. But they never expected to stay. In a time of increased investment in helping the homeless, the trailer was offered as a pathway to permanent housing. And this year, a real home seemed within reach for the couple.

In January, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $1.75 billion of new investment in housing, and in March, President Biden’s American Rescue Act passed with $50 billion in housing and homelessness assistance.

But more than a year after arriving at a stadium parking lot that was meant to be temporary, the Wilsons remain in the trailer, and feel no closer to finding permanent housing and leaving life on the streets behind.

A broken-down Cadillac near the tent where the Wilsons had been living, before they moved to a trailer. Credit...Jared R. Stapp

The Wilsons are two of the approximately 2,000 homeless seniors in Alameda County. Some have gotten lucky with long-term leases on apartments, group homes and hotel rooms. But the Wilsons’ odyssey through a year of hope and disappointment points to a more persistent crisis for the homeless population that has evaded solutions, despite a significant injection of pandemic-relief money.

“I don’t worry about a virus,” Kymberli Wilson said. “It will be false hope that gets us in the end.”

A little more than a year ago, the Wilsons’ tent-home in Oakland at the 77th Street homeless encampment had no solid walls. At the end of a line of tents, under the overpass of the Coliseum BART station, the structure was unmistakable: a sprawling patchwork of blue tarp, gray nylon and red duct tape stretched over wooden beams. Other homeless residents there called it “the mansion.”

Outside, bikes, lawn mowers and construction tools were sprawled everywhere. Inside, there was a kitchen table, a full-size bed and a dresser full of clothes.

It was all that remained of the couple’s old life. In 2014, both left their jobs at the nearby Oakland Arena — she was a cashier, he was a parking attendant — to care for her father. When her father died in 2015, she and her husband were evicted from her father’s house. They spent a year in a parking lot behind a Church’s Chicken, then moved to the encampment.

They started a landscaping business, pulling their gear on a trailer behind a mint green cruiser bicycle as they rode across the city to tend lawns and dreamed of saving enough to escape. Last year, as Covid-19 swept across the state, the pandemic brought fear and uncertainty but also something unexpected: opportunity.

One morning last year in mid-April, the encampment leader showed up at the Wilsons’ tent with news: Oakland was receiving 67 fully furnished and state-financed trailers from the state’s Office of Emergency Services to house homeless people during the pandemic. Because of their ages, the Wilsons were eligible.

The trailer community at the Oakland parking lot where the Wilsons live.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

A trailer meant running water and electricity. It meant no more trips across the BART tracks to fill five-gallon jugs with water. And no more noisy generator consuming gallons of costly gas every day. But the Wilsons were hesitant. The trailer was smaller than their tent, with less storage space. And there was no sense of how long they could stay after the pandemic.

“Our tent is all we have,” Kymberli said that night in April. “If we leave, we can never come back.”

Then they heard from a former neighbor that Operation HomeBase, a new city program to help Oakland’s oldest and most vulnerable homeless residents, wouldn’t just provide a trailer, but would also provide a case worker to help them find permanent housing. The couple talked it over, eating Panda Express on the queen-size bed in the so-called mansion. And they decided to take the risk.

“We’re not getting any younger,” Kymberli said at the time. “Every choice we make is to get back inside.”

So on May 28, the Wilsons loaded the possessions they could fit onto their bike trailer — mowers, food, clothes, shoes — and traversed the overpass to a parking lot on Hegenberger Road. They filled out forms, received keys to Unit 46 and walked inside. What they saw stunned them: an open interior, filled with light from six windows. Gleaming brown cabinets, an upholstered couch, a bed and a kitchen table. Air-conditioning, Wi-Fi and an indoor bathroom.

Outside, an awning unfolded with the push of a button. And a community building offered free on-site meals, laundry service and medical support to all residents. As soon as the Wilsons dropped off their belongings, they took celebratory showers.

As the summer faded into the fall, they adjusted. They stopped expecting the sound of rats at night. They got used to using the bathroom without going outside. Three times a day, they got in line with the other residents and enjoyed a free meal — compliments of local restaurants. The Sunday brunch was their favorite: eggs, sausages, hash browns and Danishes. They began to gain weight.

But a promised case worker, who was supposed to help them transition to a home, never materialized. In January, the Wilsons took matters into their own hands. They applied for spots in public and private housing programs. Time and again, they failed to win the housing lottery. They are now on four waiting lists.

 

Kymberli and Lenton Wilson outside of the tent where they were living last year.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

Marichelle Alcantara, homeless programs manager for Operation HomeBase, said only one case worker served all 124 of the site’s residents for the first year of the operation. In May, the site hired three more case workers. But the Wilsons, both healthy and without dependents, have not reached the top of the priority list.

“Honestly, we expected people to arrive with their own case workers,” Alcantara said in April. “We were overwhelmed by the demand for support.”

In late April, the city announced that Operation HomeBase would be extended for another year. All residents can continue living at the Hegenberger Road site until 2022.

But the Wilsons feel stuck.

They cannot move forward, and they cannot go back to the tent. Their old “mansion” still sits under the BART overpass, but it is now occupied. Everything the Wilsons left behind there has long since been claimed. Their former friends and neighbors have mostly scattered to state-sponsored hotel rooms under Project Roomkey, another program that started during the pandemic.

“We want a house key. We want to pay rent,” Kymberli said. “We never thought we’d have to wait this long.”

Brett Simpson writes for the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley, Graduate School of Journalism.

 


Apologies to Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times

Mh Kincaid
 

I apologize for my error in replying to an email sent by a member of this group. I had no idea it would go the whole group.  
Humility is at work in my world...

Maryhelen Kincaid


From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> on behalf of Mh Kincaid <jamasu88@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 8:41 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times
 
I am working/spending time in the garden, and trying to not pay attention to all the proposed actions that get lofted in these groups.  I am spending a good deal of time working on the Vanport Placemarking Project,  We got our first sign installed on June 30th and 2 more should be installed at the Vanport theater site by the end of August.  I attached a picture of the first sign. We had a booth at the Rose Cup Races July 9-11th and had a lot of good conversations with people about their knowledge, or lack of knowledge, about Vanport. Besides the heat it was a really good opportunity to connect with a different demographic.

I contacted Raven at Bybee Lakes, about getting donated pastries and bread from Marsee Bakery Outlet and she put me in touch with Richelle.  I am going to Marsee tomorrow to see what I can get donated.

I will forward you an email I sent to Dan Ryan.  There are North Portland folks all up in arms over the list of 70 sites.  Mostly complaining, and wanting citizens and neighborhoods to pick the usable sites. My belief is whoever has the money will decide, so "we" should focus on providing a plan and a way for "them" to spend thei money.  

I am glad you are having fun with your kids and grandkids.  I am not sure I could take "nonstop" but know it is really rewarding and you are making lots of memories.

Get in touch when you have time, and are rested...

Maryhelen
 


From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> on behalf of Janice Yaden via groups.io <janiceyaden@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 12:57 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times
 
I read this.  Still unanswered questions, as usual in a news article.  Anyhow, another look at homelessness.  
What are you doing these days?  Our kids are here with their kids and we are non-stop activity center.
Janice

On Tuesday, July 27, 2021, 04:36:55 PM PDT, Sally Bachman <sarahbach@...> wrote:


FYI

 

Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland

Wednesday: A homeless couple went from a tent to a trailer, but continues to wait after more than a year for something more permanent.

By Brett Simpson

July 14, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/14/us/oakland-homeless-housing.html?searchResultPosition=1

 

Good morning.

When Kymberli Wilson opens her eyes in the morning, the sight of a solid roof still disorients her.

She and her husband, Lenton, live in a 20-foot trailer at the Coliseum Stadium parking lot in Oakland. Home used to be a tent at the 77th Street homeless encampment, where they had to fill two jugs of water daily and dodge rats at night.

“It’s a big step up from the sidewalk,” Kymberli, 56, said. “No leaks, no wind, and we’re never cold.”

Kymberli and Lenton, 61, arrived at the city-run trailer site last May. But they never expected to stay. In a time of increased investment in helping the homeless, the trailer was offered as a pathway to permanent housing. And this year, a real home seemed within reach for the couple.

In January, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $1.75 billion of new investment in housing, and in March, President Biden’s American Rescue Act passed with $50 billion in housing and homelessness assistance.

But more than a year after arriving at a stadium parking lot that was meant to be temporary, the Wilsons remain in the trailer, and feel no closer to finding permanent housing and leaving life on the streets behind.

A broken-down Cadillac near the tent where the Wilsons had been living, before they moved to a trailer. Credit...Jared R. Stapp

The Wilsons are two of the approximately 2,000 homeless seniors in Alameda County. Some have gotten lucky with long-term leases on apartments, group homes and hotel rooms. But the Wilsons’ odyssey through a year of hope and disappointment points to a more persistent crisis for the homeless population that has evaded solutions, despite a significant injection of pandemic-relief money.

“I don’t worry about a virus,” Kymberli Wilson said. “It will be false hope that gets us in the end.”

A little more than a year ago, the Wilsons’ tent-home in Oakland at the 77th Street homeless encampment had no solid walls. At the end of a line of tents, under the overpass of the Coliseum BART station, the structure was unmistakable: a sprawling patchwork of blue tarp, gray nylon and red duct tape stretched over wooden beams. Other homeless residents there called it “the mansion.”

Outside, bikes, lawn mowers and construction tools were sprawled everywhere. Inside, there was a kitchen table, a full-size bed and a dresser full of clothes.

It was all that remained of the couple’s old life. In 2014, both left their jobs at the nearby Oakland Arena — she was a cashier, he was a parking attendant — to care for her father. When her father died in 2015, she and her husband were evicted from her father’s house. They spent a year in a parking lot behind a Church’s Chicken, then moved to the encampment.

They started a landscaping business, pulling their gear on a trailer behind a mint green cruiser bicycle as they rode across the city to tend lawns and dreamed of saving enough to escape. Last year, as Covid-19 swept across the state, the pandemic brought fear and uncertainty but also something unexpected: opportunity.

One morning last year in mid-April, the encampment leader showed up at the Wilsons’ tent with news: Oakland was receiving 67 fully furnished and state-financed trailers from the state’s Office of Emergency Services to house homeless people during the pandemic. Because of their ages, the Wilsons were eligible.

The trailer community at the Oakland parking lot where the Wilsons live.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

A trailer meant running water and electricity. It meant no more trips across the BART tracks to fill five-gallon jugs with water. And no more noisy generator consuming gallons of costly gas every day. But the Wilsons were hesitant. The trailer was smaller than their tent, with less storage space. And there was no sense of how long they could stay after the pandemic.

“Our tent is all we have,” Kymberli said that night in April. “If we leave, we can never come back.”

Then they heard from a former neighbor that Operation HomeBase, a new city program to help Oakland’s oldest and most vulnerable homeless residents, wouldn’t just provide a trailer, but would also provide a case worker to help them find permanent housing. The couple talked it over, eating Panda Express on the queen-size bed in the so-called mansion. And they decided to take the risk.

“We’re not getting any younger,” Kymberli said at the time. “Every choice we make is to get back inside.”

So on May 28, the Wilsons loaded the possessions they could fit onto their bike trailer — mowers, food, clothes, shoes — and traversed the overpass to a parking lot on Hegenberger Road. They filled out forms, received keys to Unit 46 and walked inside. What they saw stunned them: an open interior, filled with light from six windows. Gleaming brown cabinets, an upholstered couch, a bed and a kitchen table. Air-conditioning, Wi-Fi and an indoor bathroom.

Outside, an awning unfolded with the push of a button. And a community building offered free on-site meals, laundry service and medical support to all residents. As soon as the Wilsons dropped off their belongings, they took celebratory showers.

As the summer faded into the fall, they adjusted. They stopped expecting the sound of rats at night. They got used to using the bathroom without going outside. Three times a day, they got in line with the other residents and enjoyed a free meal — compliments of local restaurants. The Sunday brunch was their favorite: eggs, sausages, hash browns and Danishes. They began to gain weight.

But a promised case worker, who was supposed to help them transition to a home, never materialized. In January, the Wilsons took matters into their own hands. They applied for spots in public and private housing programs. Time and again, they failed to win the housing lottery. They are now on four waiting lists.

 

Kymberli and Lenton Wilson outside of the tent where they were living last year.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

Marichelle Alcantara, homeless programs manager for Operation HomeBase, said only one case worker served all 124 of the site’s residents for the first year of the operation. In May, the site hired three more case workers. But the Wilsons, both healthy and without dependents, have not reached the top of the priority list.

“Honestly, we expected people to arrive with their own case workers,” Alcantara said in April. “We were overwhelmed by the demand for support.”

In late April, the city announced that Operation HomeBase would be extended for another year. All residents can continue living at the Hegenberger Road site until 2022.

But the Wilsons feel stuck.

They cannot move forward, and they cannot go back to the tent. Their old “mansion” still sits under the BART overpass, but it is now occupied. Everything the Wilsons left behind there has long since been claimed. Their former friends and neighbors have mostly scattered to state-sponsored hotel rooms under Project Roomkey, another program that started during the pandemic.

“We want a house key. We want to pay rent,” Kymberli said. “We never thought we’d have to wait this long.”

Brett Simpson writes for the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley, Graduate School of Journalism.

 


Re: Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times

Mh Kincaid
 

I am working/spending time in the garden, and trying to not pay attention to all the propsed actions that get lofted in these groups.  I am spending a good deal of time working on the Vanport Placemarking Project,  We got our first sign installed on June 30th and 2 more should be installed at the Vanport theater site by the end of August.  I attached a picture of the first sign. We had a booth at the Rose Cup Races July 9-11th and had a lot of good conversations with people about their knowledge, or lack of knowledge, about Vanport. Besides the heat it was a really good opportunity to connect with a different demographic.

I contacted Raven at Bybee Lakes, about getting donated pastries and bread from Marsee Bakery Outlet and she put me in touch with Richelle.  I am going to Marsee tomorrow to see what I can get donated.

I will forward you an email I sent to Dan Ryan.  There are North Portland folks all up in arms over the list of 70 sites.  Mostly complaining, and wanting citizens and neighborhoods to pick the usable sites. My belief is whoever has the money will decide, so "we" should focus on providing a plan and a way for "them" to spend thei money.  

I am glad you are having fun with your kids and grandkids.  I am not sure I could take "nonstop" but know it is really rewarding and you are making lots of memories.

Get in touch when you have time, and are rested...

Maryhelen
 


From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> on behalf of Janice Yaden via groups.io <janiceyaden@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 12:57 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland-NY Times
 
I read this.  Still unanswered questions, as usual in a news article.  Anyhow, another look at homelessness.  
What are you doing these days?  Our kids are here with their kids and we are non-stop activity center.
Janice

On Tuesday, July 27, 2021, 04:36:55 PM PDT, Sally Bachman <sarahbach@...> wrote:


FYI

 

Hope and Disappointment for the Homeless in Oakland

Wednesday: A homeless couple went from a tent to a trailer, but continues to wait after more than a year for something more permanent.

By Brett Simpson

July 14, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/14/us/oakland-homeless-housing.html?searchResultPosition=1

 

Good morning.

When Kymberli Wilson opens her eyes in the morning, the sight of a solid roof still disorients her.

She and her husband, Lenton, live in a 20-foot trailer at the Coliseum Stadium parking lot in Oakland. Home used to be a tent at the 77th Street homeless encampment, where they had to fill two jugs of water daily and dodge rats at night.

“It’s a big step up from the sidewalk,” Kymberli, 56, said. “No leaks, no wind, and we’re never cold.”

Kymberli and Lenton, 61, arrived at the city-run trailer site last May. But they never expected to stay. In a time of increased investment in helping the homeless, the trailer was offered as a pathway to permanent housing. And this year, a real home seemed within reach for the couple.

In January, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $1.75 billion of new investment in housing, and in March, President Biden’s American Rescue Act passed with $50 billion in housing and homelessness assistance.

But more than a year after arriving at a stadium parking lot that was meant to be temporary, the Wilsons remain in the trailer, and feel no closer to finding permanent housing and leaving life on the streets behind.

A broken-down Cadillac near the tent where the Wilsons had been living, before they moved to a trailer. Credit...Jared R. Stapp

The Wilsons are two of the approximately 2,000 homeless seniors in Alameda County. Some have gotten lucky with long-term leases on apartments, group homes and hotel rooms. But the Wilsons’ odyssey through a year of hope and disappointment points to a more persistent crisis for the homeless population that has evaded solutions, despite a significant injection of pandemic-relief money.

“I don’t worry about a virus,” Kymberli Wilson said. “It will be false hope that gets us in the end.”

A little more than a year ago, the Wilsons’ tent-home in Oakland at the 77th Street homeless encampment had no solid walls. At the end of a line of tents, under the overpass of the Coliseum BART station, the structure was unmistakable: a sprawling patchwork of blue tarp, gray nylon and red duct tape stretched over wooden beams. Other homeless residents there called it “the mansion.”

Outside, bikes, lawn mowers and construction tools were sprawled everywhere. Inside, there was a kitchen table, a full-size bed and a dresser full of clothes.

It was all that remained of the couple’s old life. In 2014, both left their jobs at the nearby Oakland Arena — she was a cashier, he was a parking attendant — to care for her father. When her father died in 2015, she and her husband were evicted from her father’s house. They spent a year in a parking lot behind a Church’s Chicken, then moved to the encampment.

They started a landscaping business, pulling their gear on a trailer behind a mint green cruiser bicycle as they rode across the city to tend lawns and dreamed of saving enough to escape. Last year, as Covid-19 swept across the state, the pandemic brought fear and uncertainty but also something unexpected: opportunity.

One morning last year in mid-April, the encampment leader showed up at the Wilsons’ tent with news: Oakland was receiving 67 fully furnished and state-financed trailers from the state’s Office of Emergency Services to house homeless people during the pandemic. Because of their ages, the Wilsons were eligible.

The trailer community at the Oakland parking lot where the Wilsons live.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

A trailer meant running water and electricity. It meant no more trips across the BART tracks to fill five-gallon jugs with water. And no more noisy generator consuming gallons of costly gas every day. But the Wilsons were hesitant. The trailer was smaller than their tent, with less storage space. And there was no sense of how long they could stay after the pandemic.

“Our tent is all we have,” Kymberli said that night in April. “If we leave, we can never come back.”

Then they heard from a former neighbor that Operation HomeBase, a new city program to help Oakland’s oldest and most vulnerable homeless residents, wouldn’t just provide a trailer, but would also provide a case worker to help them find permanent housing. The couple talked it over, eating Panda Express on the queen-size bed in the so-called mansion. And they decided to take the risk.

“We’re not getting any younger,” Kymberli said at the time. “Every choice we make is to get back inside.”

So on May 28, the Wilsons loaded the possessions they could fit onto their bike trailer — mowers, food, clothes, shoes — and traversed the overpass to a parking lot on Hegenberger Road. They filled out forms, received keys to Unit 46 and walked inside. What they saw stunned them: an open interior, filled with light from six windows. Gleaming brown cabinets, an upholstered couch, a bed and a kitchen table. Air-conditioning, Wi-Fi and an indoor bathroom.

Outside, an awning unfolded with the push of a button. And a community building offered free on-site meals, laundry service and medical support to all residents. As soon as the Wilsons dropped off their belongings, they took celebratory showers.

As the summer faded into the fall, they adjusted. They stopped expecting the sound of rats at night. They got used to using the bathroom without going outside. Three times a day, they got in line with the other residents and enjoyed a free meal — compliments of local restaurants. The Sunday brunch was their favorite: eggs, sausages, hash browns and Danishes. They began to gain weight.

But a promised case worker, who was supposed to help them transition to a home, never materialized. In January, the Wilsons took matters into their own hands. They applied for spots in public and private housing programs. Time and again, they failed to win the housing lottery. They are now on four waiting lists.

 

Kymberli and Lenton Wilson outside of the tent where they were living last year.Credit...Jared R. Stapp

Marichelle Alcantara, homeless programs manager for Operation HomeBase, said only one case worker served all 124 of the site’s residents for the first year of the operation. In May, the site hired three more case workers. But the Wilsons, both healthy and without dependents, have not reached the top of the priority list.

“Honestly, we expected people to arrive with their own case workers,” Alcantara said in April. “We were overwhelmed by the demand for support.”

In late April, the city announced that Operation HomeBase would be extended for another year. All residents can continue living at the Hegenberger Road site until 2022.

But the Wilsons feel stuck.

They cannot move forward, and they cannot go back to the tent. Their old “mansion” still sits under the BART overpass, but it is now occupied. Everything the Wilsons left behind there has long since been claimed. Their former friends and neighbors have mostly scattered to state-sponsored hotel rooms under Project Roomkey, another program that started during the pandemic.

“We want a house key. We want to pay rent,” Kymberli said. “We never thought we’d have to wait this long.”

Brett Simpson writes for the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley, Graduate School of Journalism.

 

81 - 100 of 792