Date   

Re: 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Taffy Everts
 

Thanks for your supportive comments! The proposed building site is the two lots at 1810 and 1838 N Argyle Street at N Fenwick. The project will be presented at the Kenton Neighborhood Association (KNA) board meeting tomorrow evening. More info about the building is at https://historickenton.com/new-development-proposed-for-n-argyle/.

 

I will forward the lawyer’s email link to one of the current residents.

 

Sincerely,

Taffy

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Andrew Olshin
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 9:05 PM
To: Shelter Forum <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

 

Elise

I’ve heard good things about this lawyer:

 

https://underdoglawyer.com/



On Jul 12, 2021, at 8:54 PM, Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

 

I also think it's relevant for the forum. I think it's problematic if we only focus on things once someone has nowhere to live, rather than look at the systems that create that scenario. And the case Taffy raises is very lPDX ocal and current.

 

Elise

 

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 10:36 PM Trena Sutton <thegirlsok@...> wrote:

Just my opinion but I think it is very appropriate for this venue. I could find out which Developer if I can get a street name and cross street.

 

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021, 6:04 PM Taffy Everts <taffy@...> wrote:

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 

 

 


 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

 


Re: 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Andrew Olshin
 

Elise
I’ve heard good things about this lawyer:

https://underdoglawyer.com/

On Jul 12, 2021, at 8:54 PM, Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

I also think it's relevant for the forum. I think it's problematic if we only focus on things once someone has nowhere to live, rather than look at the systems that create that scenario. And the case Taffy raises is very lPDX ocal and current.

Elise

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 10:36 PM Trena Sutton <thegirlsok@...> wrote:
Just my opinion but I think it is very appropriate for this venue. I could find out which Developer if I can get a street name and cross street.

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021, 6:04 PM Taffy Everts <taffy@...> wrote:

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 





--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Elise Aymer
 

I also think it's relevant for the forum. I think it's problematic if we only focus on things once someone has nowhere to live, rather than look at the systems that create that scenario. And the case Taffy raises is very lPDX ocal and current.

Elise

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 10:36 PM Trena Sutton <thegirlsok@...> wrote:
Just my opinion but I think it is very appropriate for this venue. I could find out which Developer if I can get a street name and cross street.

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021, 6:04 PM Taffy Everts <taffy@...> wrote:

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Trena Sutton
 

Just my opinion but I think it is very appropriate for this venue. I could find out which Developer if I can get a street name and cross street.


On Mon, Jul 12, 2021, 6:04 PM Taffy Everts <taffy@...> wrote:

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 


Re: 11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Trena Sutton
 

Do you know who the Developer is?

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 6:04 PM Taffy Everts <taffy@...> wrote:

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 


11-story building to displace low-income residents in Kenton

Taffy Everts
 

I’m not sure this is the right forum for this question, but I’m wondering whether low-income folks displaced from affordable housing have any right to replacement housing. A developer wants to build an 11-story building on two lots containing low-rise mid-20th-century apartments whose residents reportedly pay $500-$800/month. Described at https://efiles.portlandoregon.gov/record/14460187, the new building’s proposed 290 units (studios and 1- & 2-bedroom apartments) will rent for 60% of Average Median Income (AMI).

 

The AMI for our area currently ranges from $40,620 for 1 person to $58,020 for a family of 4—too much, according to NextDoor posts, for at least 8 of the current residents, who will likely become homeless. There’s no provision for offering them apartments in the new building at or near their current rents. Do they have any legal recourse?

 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Jayme Delson
 

Hi all,

In my opinion Well Said Tim, all the way to the end.   

There are many reasons why national policy remains in service of its own interests, with little touch, or interest in the needs of the many.  There are many reasons why state and local public and non profits overwhelmingly tend to follow the lead of national policy. 

Clearly as we have seen, this has led us to where we are today.   Perhaps at some point enough of us will begin to follow and serve the interests of the most in need, bless them for they are the canary in the mine.
Cheers,

Jayme


On 7/8/2021 4:31 PM, Tim McCormick wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Elise Aymer
 

I am following up the initial video I shared on the Denver campsites with a video giving a more in-depth tour (apparently of a demo village Colorado Village Collaborative set up).

The speaker in the video is Cuica Montoya, who was featured in the NBC video. They (Cuica - unsure of pronouns) seem to have pitched their dialogue to an audience anxious about/skeptical of campsites for houseless persons. In this video, Cuica frames unsanctioned "encampments" as problematic in contrast to what Colorado Village Collaborative provides.

I'm sharing this because I know that I wanted to know more about what's happening with the Denver campsites given the surface nature of the NBC video. This video provided a tour of the set-up, structures and a description of the surfaces offered.

Of course, the issues that Tim raised around the nature of the housing (that dichotomy - transitional shelter vs. "home"), the larger problem, plus the way this video is framed/pitched are still there. I would argue, for example, that the amenities listed are what's needed all of the time, even outside of a pandemic.


It's from October 2020 and is 2 min 51 seconds

From another video, I watched on the campsites/villages, in winter they use (insulated) ice fishing tents and have heavy duty sleeping gear for residents, as well.

My understanding is that the sites receive private funding. I'm wondering about this.


It's much longer at 14 min 48 seconds and takes the form of an interview with a journalist who spent the night at and has been covering the sites. The link above starts five minutes in when they start to talk about the opposition the sites faced and why. Tim mentioned that it was difficult for the sites to find a "home" so I was wanting to know more about that. The problems will be familiar re Portland.

I find that I tend to take in information well that way and also can do other things while I listen - so am sharing this way..

I realize that video consumes bandwidth/data and so isn't a convenient way for everyone to access info. Apologies upfront.

The village org's link was given as https://www.coloradovillagecollaborative.org


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 8:55 PM Elise Aymer via groups.io <elise=criticaldiversitysolutions.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks, Tim, for those clarifications and corrections and the context and deeper observations missing from the NBC segment. 

That this is a grassroots, village effort definitely did not come through in the reporting, nor that it was so hard won.

One, detail I wondered about was the paid security mentioned.

Elise

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 7:37 PM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Elise Aymer
 

Thanks, Tim, for those clarifications and corrections and the context and deeper observations missing from the NBC segment. 

That this is a grassroots, village effort definitely did not come through in the reporting, nor that it was so hard won.

One, detail I wondered about was the paid security mentioned.

Elise


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 7:37 PM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Joseph Purkey
 

There must be a way to regulate out at least some of the profit from the housing market to allow housing to go back to being for people instead of pocket books. I have no brilliant ideas, sorry. Just still frustrated around (and agreeing with) Peter's point that there is not a shortage of built housing. 

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 | cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...


On Thu, Jul 8, 2021, 4:46 PM Peter Finley Fry <peter@...> wrote:

Thoughtful comments

 

I continue to believe that there is an abundance of housing in this country.  To experience real housing shortages requires visiting the many countries torn apart by war.

 

I believe the fundamental issue is to build communities where people can live and support each other.

 

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 4:37 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

 

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

 

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

 

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Peter Finley Fry
 

Thoughtful comments

 

I continue to believe that there is an abundance of housing in this country.  To experience real housing shortages requires visiting the many countries torn apart by war.

 

I believe the fundamental issue is to build communities where people can live and support each other.

 

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 4:37 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

 

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

 

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

 

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Tim McCormick
 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Peter Finley Fry
 

I want to express my appreciation for this medium of education and communication.

 

I believe that the underlying cause of homelessness is the fragmentation of community in our nation; ironically caused by the fact that our nation is composed of refugees from all the nations of the world trying to find a way to restore their cultures and form new communities in this “promised land”.

 

This forum is an important part of bringing us together.  Thank you.   

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elise Aymer via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 11:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

 


Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Elise Aymer
 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her



Re: 3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Tim McCormick
 

Barb,
this comment is inappropriate and a false accusation:

> "I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count." 

I believe you are referring to the last A Home For Everyone, Safety Off the Streets Workgroup meeting, on May 18th.

I certainly did not -- and would not -- say what you allege; it was a comment *you* made, after I asked the group moderator to try to follow up on or route, generally, any questions asked during the meeting, in saying which I in no way made or intended any reference to you, as I clarified during the meeting. I have a recording of the full meeting, so could demonstrate this to anyone interested.

I am sorry and puzzled why you seem to have and voice such a view of me. I am not aware of having ever done anything of harm to you, or you or anyone on your behalf ever communicating any concern to me, and as far as I know I have never met you. I invited you, after your comments in the last meeting, to contact me, and gave you several avenues at which to do so, but didn't hear from you.

By making a false and unsubstantiated accusation, your posting violates this group's policy, particularly because directed at a self-identified, presently houseless person. As a result, as moderator of this group, I have switched your account to require moderator approval of posts from now on, and ask you not to attempt joining or posting to this group via a different account, which would also directly violate group policy. 

 I really do not wish to, and have very little time and internet access available to me, for dealing with and responding to any inappropriate or harmful activity in this group. It would quickly lead to needing to shut off open posting to this list -- which I would greatly regret, as for me a key purpose of this forum is offering and assuring an open platform and direct voice to marginalized, typically unvoiced community members.

I ask that you and all group members respect guidelines of being respectful to all group members, and avoiding any false  and particularly any potentially libelous statements. 
regards, Tim.


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 2:53 PM Barb Rainish <whatisright88@...> wrote:
Hi Tim, thank you for posting this. Thank you for running PDXshelterforum. 

I have been around AHFE for several years. Mostly at coordinating board and SOS workgroup meetings.

I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count.
Feel free to reach out to me.

Barb. Rainish
Freelance advocate
Peer support specialist (PSS)

On Wed, Jul 7, 2021, 2:21 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: 3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Barb Rainish
 

Hi Tim, thank you for posting this. Thank you for running PDXshelterforum. 

I have been around AHFE for several years. Mostly at coordinating board and SOS workgroup meetings.

I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count.
Feel free to reach out to me.

Barb. Rainish
Freelance advocate
Peer support specialist (PSS)

On Wed, Jul 7, 2021, 2:21 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Tim McCormick
 

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

Mark Lakeman
 

Tim,

Thanks for keeping me in the loop, via your emails and posts.
I'm curious, what is leaving you feeling like Portland is not a good place for your efforts?
I hear you that housing opportunities certainly suck here. Is that it, mainly, or is it more?
I know that Ridhi at City Repair can be intense and disrespectful. Have they contributed to your alienation?

I hope you're okay.
Mark



Mark Lakeman, Principal & Design Lead                                  Mark Lakeman, Co-Founder
1421 SE Division St | Portland, OR 97202 | t: 503.230.1293               c: 503.381.5885 |  www.cityrepair.org
c: 503.381.5885 | trout@... 

communitecture.net

                                                                       City Repair



On Wed, Jun 30, 2021 at 2:42 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
my spoken testimony at Portland City Council, Weds June 30th, 2021 (AM session):
(starting 2:37:35, 3 minutes).

I was loosely testifying on agenda Item 519, "Safe Rest Villages" city ordinance, which passed by unanimous vote later in meeting. I didn't particularly comment on this ordinance, but generally remarked:

1) there was no engagement by city councilmembers or the Streets to Stability taskforce (which developed this ordinance, drafted last week and first publicly discussed today) with PDX Shelter Forum or me at all. Despite us being in respects the largest & most active houseless-led/centered advocacy group in Portland, regarding village & shelter issues. Also, despite our constant effort over the past year to engage councilmembers and staff via many channels - phone calls, emails, meeting requests, repeated invitations to all councilmembers' office to join our public forums and online web/email forum. 

2. I don't agree with key points in the proposal as presented, eg the focus strictly on "chronic homeless" with over two years of unsheltered homelessness. The overwhelming majority of people experiencing houselessness do not fit this category.

3. I argue that the real need, if these issues are being taken seriously, is 10,000s of additional, low cost, low barrier, permanent homes, as rapidly as possible.

I noted that I have with collaborators for three years developed and presented detailed, worked-through proposals for rapid low-cost housing programs to meet such scale and timeframe of need, under the name New Starter Homes (and "permanent villages"), but have encountered near total refusal on the part of city officials, staff, media, and other leaders to even discuss any such approach. 

Lastly, I noted that at this point I have left Oregon because of recently being abruptly forced out of my (always tenuous) housing, and I don't know if I will be able to or choose to come back to Portland. I don't see a place I can live, and I am increasingly doubtful it is a good place for me to pursue the advocacy, research, and housing-development projects I am working and wish to work on. 
Bcc:
Andrea Durbin, Director of Bureau of Planning and Sustainability andrea.durbin@...

Commissioner Dan Ryan CommissionerRyanOffice@...

Morgan Tracy, Bureau of Planning & Sustainability, Project Manager (including for Residential Infill Project Part 2 morgan.tracy@...

Commissioner Sharon Meieran sharon.meieran@...


On Wed, Jun 30, 2021 at 12:13 PM Commissioner Ryan Office <CommissionerRyanOffice@...> wrote:

Thank you for your testimony Tim.

Kindly,

Yesenia

 

Yesenia L. Carrillo

Constituent Relations Specialist, Policy & Communication Advisor

Office of Commissioner Dan Ryan

Pronouns: she, her, hers, ella

Se habla español

1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Suite 240

Portland, OR 97204

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 1:59 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

 

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

Select agenda item 519.

 

Meeting agenda:

Ordinance:

 

Excerpts:

"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

 

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."

 

 

Background / Process note:

 

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

 

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

 

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

 

Bcc: 

Commissioner Dan Ryan

phone: 503-823-3589

Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

 

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 

503-823-6930

 

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 

 

 

 

 

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Opinions he on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Elise Aymer
 

Thanks for sharing the film, Tommy.

Elise


On Wed, Jun 30, 2021, 8:13 PM Tommy Kiser, <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all, thanks again for everyone’s input. I wanted to share the finished short with the group.


Cheers,
-Tommy

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

I’m downtown at 4th and Everett.  I’m watching the Central City concern / Downtown Clean and Safe street cleanup team.   And I’m wondering if Proud Ground isn’t the more direct route to getting folks off the streets.  Isn’t the contract for Clean and Safe up for grabs?  Open? Willing?

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:35 AM, Donna Cohen <dcohen@...> wrote:


This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.
 
Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.
 
 
Donna 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 
 
On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy



Re: Opinions he on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Tommy Kiser
 

Hi all, thanks again for everyone’s input. I wanted to share the finished short with the group.


Cheers,
-Tommy

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

I’m downtown at 4th and Everett.  I’m watching the Central City concern / Downtown Clean and Safe street cleanup team.   And I’m wondering if Proud Ground isn’t the more direct route to getting folks off the streets.  Isn’t the contract for Clean and Safe up for grabs?  Open? Willing?

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:35 AM, Donna Cohen <dcohen@...> wrote:


This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.
 
Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.
 
 
Donna 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 
 
On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


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