Date   

Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Tim McCormick
 

thanks Elise. This is the work of and run by Colorado Village Collaborative, led by Cole Chandler, longtime active members & friends of Village Collaborative network (https://villagecollaborative.net), whom I visited in Denver a few years back.

The mainstream media segment has some good visuals, and does respectfully give time to a homeless resident at one of the sites, but unshockingly mis-expresses or misframes various things, from my standpoint. It isn't City or 'Denver' run, it happened out of many years of devoted activism, sometimes quite oppositional, pushing against vacillating and often unreceptive/hostile City practices.

NBC represent the sites as strictly not a 'home', but as an in-between point from which to look for a home. This, of course, is not necessarily, in fact often not, how houseless people and activists speak of it.

Finally, while in this they are generally following CVC's messaging, I generally question NBC's typical -- you might say, compulsively anxious -- framing of this and all they group with it as just tents, non-homes, non-housing; strictly separated from that implied but undefined realm of real housing. Mostly, that imagined 'real' mainstream housing isn't there, and isn't going to be there, for the people residing at CVC's safe spaces. From my perspective, there rarely is, in the US and most countries, any plausible plan in motion, hardly even being imagined, for creation of the needed housing on the scale and of types needed - certainly not in Denver, as far as I've seen. 

Denver reported year-over-year home price appreciation of *26.13 percent* in May. As in many parts of the US, housing cost escalation is practically out of control, far outpacing and overwhelming even the relatively huge recent Fed/state funding flows which might help, were they well used. Mass displacement is accelerating, from overlapping, entwined disasters of Covid, inequality/asset-boom, climate disruption, mass heatwave and wildfires, etc. 

In most places I see leaders mainly, same as it ever was, holding on steady to their positions and practices and conventional notions, thanking their stars to be at least further up the ladder, above the flood, and ahead of the fires, than the unwashed masses being hit by the brunt of disruption and the leaders' & landed's general failure to act or adapt on the level needed.




On Thu, Jul 8, 2021 at 11:11 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Peter Finley Fry
 

I want to express my appreciation for this medium of education and communication.

 

I believe that the underlying cause of homelessness is the fragmentation of community in our nation; ironically caused by the fact that our nation is composed of refugees from all the nations of the world trying to find a way to restore their cultures and form new communities in this “promised land”.

 

This forum is an important part of bringing us together.  Thank you.   

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elise Aymer via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 11:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.

 

 

This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

 

Elise

 

--

Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions

Pronouns: She/her

 

 


Denver's Expanding City-Run Campsites

Elise Aymer
 

I am sharing a news video on Denver's City-run campsites - that they've been deploying across their city and expanding since the pandemic, as it's likely to be referenced as a model in Portland and elsewhere.


This is a mainstream (NBC) news segment so it doesn't delve into what's happening in detail or fully examine ramifications. I also didn't find it properly presented the bigger picture either or ask the important "whys." In other words, a great deal of context and analysis are missing. 

So, in posting this, I'm expecting it to be useful in providing a brief view (literally) of what's happening there and a starting point for finding out more. Once something like this (in a western city) is being featured in the mainstream, national news, I expect it to assume more prominence in the discussion in Portland.

Elise

--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her



Re: 3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Tim McCormick
 

Barb,
this comment is inappropriate and a false accusation:

> "I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count." 

I believe you are referring to the last A Home For Everyone, Safety Off the Streets Workgroup meeting, on May 18th.

I certainly did not -- and would not -- say what you allege; it was a comment *you* made, after I asked the group moderator to try to follow up on or route, generally, any questions asked during the meeting, in saying which I in no way made or intended any reference to you, as I clarified during the meeting. I have a recording of the full meeting, so could demonstrate this to anyone interested.

I am sorry and puzzled why you seem to have and voice such a view of me. I am not aware of having ever done anything of harm to you, or you or anyone on your behalf ever communicating any concern to me, and as far as I know I have never met you. I invited you, after your comments in the last meeting, to contact me, and gave you several avenues at which to do so, but didn't hear from you.

By making a false and unsubstantiated accusation, your posting violates this group's policy, particularly because directed at a self-identified, presently houseless person. As a result, as moderator of this group, I have switched your account to require moderator approval of posts from now on, and ask you not to attempt joining or posting to this group via a different account, which would also directly violate group policy. 

 I really do not wish to, and have very little time and internet access available to me, for dealing with and responding to any inappropriate or harmful activity in this group. It would quickly lead to needing to shut off open posting to this list -- which I would greatly regret, as for me a key purpose of this forum is offering and assuring an open platform and direct voice to marginalized, typically unvoiced community members.

I ask that you and all group members respect guidelines of being respectful to all group members, and avoiding any false  and particularly any potentially libelous statements. 
regards, Tim.


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 2:53 PM Barb Rainish <whatisright88@...> wrote:
Hi Tim, thank you for posting this. Thank you for running PDXshelterforum. 

I have been around AHFE for several years. Mostly at coordinating board and SOS workgroup meetings.

I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count.
Feel free to reach out to me.

Barb. Rainish
Freelance advocate
Peer support specialist (PSS)

On Wed, Jul 7, 2021, 2:21 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: 3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Barb Rainish
 

Hi Tim, thank you for posting this. Thank you for running PDXshelterforum. 

I have been around AHFE for several years. Mostly at coordinating board and SOS workgroup meetings.

I am the one you told last month you don't know me, so my answers don't count.
Feel free to reach out to me.

Barb. Rainish
Freelance advocate
Peer support specialist (PSS)

On Wed, Jul 7, 2021, 2:21 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


3-5pm Weds, join/testify at AHFE Coordinating Board monthly mtg

Tim McCormick
 

general or on-agenda-item public comment is open at start, up to two minutes for 5 speakers, and possible additional comment time at end.


This is a top opportunity to be heard on Portland/Multnomah County homelessness issues. Speak now and tune in (or watch later) or.. well, most alternatives are likely less useful or impactful. This meeting is also recorded and later made available on YouTube, which adds to the value of getting your points on record here. 


HOW TO CONNECT:  use Zoom link

https://multco-us.zoom.us/j/95397406941?pwd=ZVg0RFNKcEpOSXlTMUdGSThyLzVadz09


In general, for future meetings:

1) go to http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board

2) scroll down to "Meeting Materials"

3) under current meeting date, click on "meeting agenda" 

4) click on underlined link in text: "Follow this link to view the meeting as a member of the public from your computer or the Zoom mobile app." 


July 7 agenda: 

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566631e8c21b864679fff4de/t/60df964ab960ab067c40007b/1625265769756/CB_Agenda_20210707.pdf


10 min

Welcome & Introductions

Board Co-Chairs

Informational

10 min

Open for Public Comment: Up to five people, two minute limit per person.

All

Discussion

5 min

Group Agreements

 All

Informational

20 min

Emergency Housing Vouchers

 Bill Boyd

Informational, Decision

25 min

Supportive Housing Services (SHS) Implementation Update

Cristal Otero, Marc Jolin

Informational, Discussion

30 min

Eviction Prevention & Rent Assistance Briefing

Marc Jolin and DCHS Staff

Informational, Discussion

10 min

Additional Public Comment

All

Discussion

10 min

General Updates & Announcements

All

Informational


HOW TO GIVE PUBLIC COMMENT

Starting with the April 7 meeting, "Members of the public will not be able to participate directly outside of public comments, but will be able to hear and see meeting participants and shared materials. The meeting will be accessible 15 minutes prior to the start time.


"Attendees may submit comment in writing to AHFE@... to be read aloud by Joint Office Staff, or provide their comment verbally. Time allotted for public comments is up to five people, two minute limit per person. An additional period for public comment has been added at the end of the agenda." 


[formerly, public participants could use the Zoom chat channel to comment, ask questions, discuss, or add notes. For spoken Public Comment, it is not quite clear how speaking slots are now requested or assigned - try emailing AHFE@...?]. 


BACKGROUND

A Home For Everyone is Multnomah County's homelessness policy coordinating body and Federally-recognized Continuum of Care. See: http://ahomeforeveryone.net/. It has a Coordinating board that reports to a smaller Executive Board. 


See http://ahomeforeveryone.net/coordinating-board for Board members, Agendas, meeting materials (posted some time before meeting, like day of), recordings (posted usually within week after meeting) 

-------------------------
this is an event listing from PDX Shelter Forum events calendar. You can view or subscribe to this calendar: 

view the calendar: https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles

subscribe to the calendar with Google Calendar (add it to your Google Calendar - you can then turn it on or off or delete it later):  https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=cGR4c2hlbHRlcmZvcnVtQGdtYWlsLmNvbQ

get calendar in iCal file format (used by most calendar software): https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/pdxshelterforum%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

Mark Lakeman
 

Tim,

Thanks for keeping me in the loop, via your emails and posts.
I'm curious, what is leaving you feeling like Portland is not a good place for your efforts?
I hear you that housing opportunities certainly suck here. Is that it, mainly, or is it more?
I know that Ridhi at City Repair can be intense and disrespectful. Have they contributed to your alienation?

I hope you're okay.
Mark



Mark Lakeman, Principal & Design Lead                                  Mark Lakeman, Co-Founder
1421 SE Division St | Portland, OR 97202 | t: 503.230.1293               c: 503.381.5885 |  www.cityrepair.org
c: 503.381.5885 | trout@... 

communitecture.net

                                                                       City Repair



On Wed, Jun 30, 2021 at 2:42 PM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
my spoken testimony at Portland City Council, Weds June 30th, 2021 (AM session):
(starting 2:37:35, 3 minutes).

I was loosely testifying on agenda Item 519, "Safe Rest Villages" city ordinance, which passed by unanimous vote later in meeting. I didn't particularly comment on this ordinance, but generally remarked:

1) there was no engagement by city councilmembers or the Streets to Stability taskforce (which developed this ordinance, drafted last week and first publicly discussed today) with PDX Shelter Forum or me at all. Despite us being in respects the largest & most active houseless-led/centered advocacy group in Portland, regarding village & shelter issues. Also, despite our constant effort over the past year to engage councilmembers and staff via many channels - phone calls, emails, meeting requests, repeated invitations to all councilmembers' office to join our public forums and online web/email forum. 

2. I don't agree with key points in the proposal as presented, eg the focus strictly on "chronic homeless" with over two years of unsheltered homelessness. The overwhelming majority of people experiencing houselessness do not fit this category.

3. I argue that the real need, if these issues are being taken seriously, is 10,000s of additional, low cost, low barrier, permanent homes, as rapidly as possible.

I noted that I have with collaborators for three years developed and presented detailed, worked-through proposals for rapid low-cost housing programs to meet such scale and timeframe of need, under the name New Starter Homes (and "permanent villages"), but have encountered near total refusal on the part of city officials, staff, media, and other leaders to even discuss any such approach. 

Lastly, I noted that at this point I have left Oregon because of recently being abruptly forced out of my (always tenuous) housing, and I don't know if I will be able to or choose to come back to Portland. I don't see a place I can live, and I am increasingly doubtful it is a good place for me to pursue the advocacy, research, and housing-development projects I am working and wish to work on. 
Bcc:
Andrea Durbin, Director of Bureau of Planning and Sustainability andrea.durbin@...

Commissioner Dan Ryan CommissionerRyanOffice@...

Morgan Tracy, Bureau of Planning & Sustainability, Project Manager (including for Residential Infill Project Part 2 morgan.tracy@...

Commissioner Sharon Meieran sharon.meieran@...


On Wed, Jun 30, 2021 at 12:13 PM Commissioner Ryan Office <CommissionerRyanOffice@...> wrote:

Thank you for your testimony Tim.

Kindly,

Yesenia

 

Yesenia L. Carrillo

Constituent Relations Specialist, Policy & Communication Advisor

Office of Commissioner Dan Ryan

Pronouns: she, her, hers, ella

Se habla español

1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Suite 240

Portland, OR 97204

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 1:59 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

 

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

Select agenda item 519.

 

Meeting agenda:

Ordinance:

 

Excerpts:

"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

 

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."

 

 

Background / Process note:

 

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

 

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

 

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

 

Bcc: 

Commissioner Dan Ryan

phone: 503-823-3589

Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

 

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 

503-823-6930

 

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 

 

 

 

 

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Opinions he on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Elise Aymer
 

Thanks for sharing the film, Tommy.

Elise


On Wed, Jun 30, 2021, 8:13 PM Tommy Kiser, <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all, thanks again for everyone’s input. I wanted to share the finished short with the group.


Cheers,
-Tommy

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

I’m downtown at 4th and Everett.  I’m watching the Central City concern / Downtown Clean and Safe street cleanup team.   And I’m wondering if Proud Ground isn’t the more direct route to getting folks off the streets.  Isn’t the contract for Clean and Safe up for grabs?  Open? Willing?

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:35 AM, Donna Cohen <dcohen@...> wrote:


This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.
 
Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.
 
 
Donna 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 
 
On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy



Re: Opinions he on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Tommy Kiser
 

Hi all, thanks again for everyone’s input. I wanted to share the finished short with the group.


Cheers,
-Tommy

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

I’m downtown at 4th and Everett.  I’m watching the Central City concern / Downtown Clean and Safe street cleanup team.   And I’m wondering if Proud Ground isn’t the more direct route to getting folks off the streets.  Isn’t the contract for Clean and Safe up for grabs?  Open? Willing?

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:35 AM, Donna Cohen <dcohen@...> wrote:


This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.
 
Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.
 
 
Donna 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 
 
On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy



Re: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

Tim McCormick
 

my spoken testimony at Portland City Council, Weds June 30th, 2021 (AM session):
(starting 2:37:35, 3 minutes).

I was loosely testifying on agenda Item 519, "Safe Rest Villages" city ordinance, which passed by unanimous vote later in meeting. I didn't particularly comment on this ordinance, but generally remarked:

1) there was no engagement by city councilmembers or the Streets to Stability taskforce (which developed this ordinance, drafted last week and first publicly discussed today) with PDX Shelter Forum or me at all. Despite us being in respects the largest & most active houseless-led/centered advocacy group in Portland, regarding village & shelter issues. Also, despite our constant effort over the past year to engage councilmembers and staff via many channels - phone calls, emails, meeting requests, repeated invitations to all councilmembers' office to join our public forums and online web/email forum. 

2. I don't agree with key points in the proposal as presented, eg the focus strictly on "chronic homeless" with over two years of unsheltered homelessness. The overwhelming majority of people experiencing houselessness do not fit this category.

3. I argue that the real need, if these issues are being taken seriously, is 10,000s of additional, low cost, low barrier, permanent homes, as rapidly as possible.

I noted that I have with collaborators for three years developed and presented detailed, worked-through proposals for rapid low-cost housing programs to meet such scale and timeframe of need, under the name New Starter Homes (and "permanent villages"), but have encountered near total refusal on the part of city officials, staff, media, and other leaders to even discuss any such approach. 

Lastly, I noted that at this point I have left Oregon because of recently being abruptly forced out of my (always tenuous) housing, and I don't know if I will be able to or choose to come back to Portland. I don't see a place I can live, and I am increasingly doubtful it is a good place for me to pursue the advocacy, research, and housing-development projects I am working and wish to work on. 
Bcc:
Andrea Durbin, Director of Bureau of Planning and Sustainability andrea.durbin@...

Commissioner Dan Ryan CommissionerRyanOffice@...

Morgan Tracy, Bureau of Planning & Sustainability, Project Manager (including for Residential Infill Project Part 2 morgan.tracy@...

Commissioner Sharon Meieran sharon.meieran@...


On Wed, Jun 30, 2021 at 12:13 PM Commissioner Ryan Office <CommissionerRyanOffice@...> wrote:

Thank you for your testimony Tim.

Kindly,

Yesenia

 

Yesenia L. Carrillo

Constituent Relations Specialist, Policy & Communication Advisor

Office of Commissioner Dan Ryan

Pronouns: she, her, hers, ella

Se habla español

1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Suite 240

Portland, OR 97204

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 1:59 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

 

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

Select agenda item 519.

 

Meeting agenda:

Ordinance:

 

Excerpts:

"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

 

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."

 

 

Background / Process note:

 

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

 

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

 

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

 

Bcc: 

Commissioner Dan Ryan

phone: 503-823-3589

Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

 

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 

503-823-6930

 

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 

 

 

 

 

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

Commissioner Ryan Office <CommissionerRyanOffice@...>
 

Thank you for your testimony Tim.

 

Kindly,

Yesenia

 

Yesenia L. Carrillo

Constituent Relations Specialist, Policy & Communication Advisor

Office of Commissioner Dan Ryan

Pronouns: she, her, hers, ella

Se habla español

1221 SW Fourth Avenue, Suite 240

Portland, OR 97204

From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 1:59 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

 

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

Select agenda item 519.

 

Meeting agenda:

Ordinance:

 

Excerpts:

"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

 

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."

 

 

Background / Process note:

 

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

 

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

 

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

 

Bcc: 

Commissioner Dan Ryan

phone: 503-823-3589

Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

 

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 

503-823-6930

 

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 

 

 

 

 

 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 


Re: City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

David Dickson
 

You deserve a break, Tim.   Our elected officials may not have benefitted from your tireless advocacy and information sharing, but I and many Portland volunteers have.  And it is making a difference.  Safe travels!

On Jun 29, 2021, at 1:59 PM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997
Select agenda item 519.

Meeting agenda:
Ordinance:

Excerpts:
"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."


Background / Process note:

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

Bcc: 
Commissioner Dan Ryan
phone: 503-823-3589
Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 
503-823-6930

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 





--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


City Coucil hearing Weds AM on new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance

Tim McCormick
 

Sign up by 4pm to testify tomorrow AM on the new "Safe Rest Villages" ordinance proposed by Commissioner Dan Ryan coming before council tomorrow. 

register yourself here before 4pm today, Tuesday: portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997
Select agenda item 519.

Meeting agenda:
Ordinance:

Excerpts:
"The Council has directed City Bureaus to provide a list of surplus City property for use as Outdoor Shelters by June 30, 2021. Outdoor Shelters on City property will be known as Safe Rest Villages."

"The [Homelessness and Urban Camping] Impact Reduction Program will refer persons residing in high impact encampments to Safe Rest Villages when available and will assist in said persons’ relocation to Safe Rest Villages."


Background / Process note:

The ordinance was drafted last week, and apparently first publicly posted via the Council weekly agenda materials posted Friday.

It what seems to be increasingly typical Portland official procedure, this was developed internally and based on specific & managed outreach engagements, overseen  by Dan Ryan's office, rather than being publicly announced and developed with open input, at least until now.

As with the other commissioners, Dan Ryan and his office staff have not responded to numerous efforts via many channels, over the last year, from me and co-organizers to engage with the PDX Shelter Forum community, participate in our public forums, or to comment or respond to our many written and spoken testimonies and proposals. 

I've never received a followup response from any City of Portland Commissioner, to many inquiries, invitations, and requests, made in writing, in person, or in spoken public testimony and comments, in three years of advocacy work since I moved back to Portland. 

I was born and part grew up in Portland, family came here in 1968, and I've lived here on and off across 45 years. My parents were longtime public servants with the City of Portland and Portland Public Schools, and I graduated from PPS schools. Of the many other places I've meanwhile lived, worked, and advocated, I've never personally experienced such a consistent level of indifference or refusal of engagement by public officials (and to some extent, various other community leaders) to citizen advocacy, as I have in Portland in recent years. Perhaps you may have better results though! Seems quite doubtful to me that it's worth my time trying though, and I'm now out of state travelling for the time being. 

Bcc: 
Commissioner Dan Ryan
phone: 503-823-3589
Twitter: @DanRyanPDX

Lucas Hillier - director, HUCIRP (Homelessness and Urban Camping Impact Reduction Program, part of Office of Management and Finance, City of Portland). 
503-823-6930

All recipients: We incite open public discussion. You can reply to the PDX Shelter Forum group by replying to this message. 





--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Action Alerts from Housing Oregon - Affordable housing funding

David Dickson
 

The arts might be slightly off the subject of shelter, but what better way than the arts to seek shelter from the storm?  The Downtown Neighborhood Association is working with the First Congregational Church, which is planning an arts festival, Art and Soul, for September 12 from 1-4 pm at the church and the South Parks Blocks.  They are seeking Portland area artists, poets and musicians who are experiencing houselessness.  Participants will receive an honorarium for participating.  I would welcome any suggestions.  You can reach me at dicksondavidk@...

Thanks!!!

On Jun 18, 2021, at 12:30 PM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

please take a minute to contact your state legislators about any of these bills - it's the final 12 days of session.

Tip: if you don't know your state Senator and Representative or their contact info, you can look that up easily here:  
Copy it down and keep handy to contact them in future.

Also, consider getting on the mailing lists that most of them have, to find out about local Town Halls and what they are working on. Go to a Town Hall (online or in person), introduce yourself to the official and/or their chief of staff or housing advisor who'll likely be there, tell them briefly what you're most interested in and why, and any group(s) you advocate with (could be PDX Shelter Forum, eg). This probably helps later letters or testimony from you or your orgs have impact on them. It's a bit like Sales, you usually need many touch points, so to speak.
-Tim. 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Housing Oregon <housingoregon@...>
Date: Fri, Jun 18, 2021 at 11:34 AM
Subject: Action Alert - Affordable housing funding measures
To: Tim McCormick <housingoregon.org@...>



Final Weeks of Oregon Legislative Session

Contact your legislators on racial justice,  development, preservation, and homeless services funding bills

Now is the time to send a last message(s) to your State legislators to remind them how critical funding is needed for affordable housing, emergency shelters, and homeownership as the effects of the COVID pandemic continue to disproportionately affect low-income and Black, Indigenous and People of Color communities across Oregon. 

Reach out to your Representative and Senator to ask for their support on one or several of the bills listed below. If you have more time, consider reaching out to members of one of the Joint Committees considering these bills.

Housing Oregon is a member of the Oregon Housing Alliance. Check out our legislative agenda priorities and endorsements. Thanks to the Housing Alliance for legislation descriptions.

How to contact your Legislators

Racial Justice bills

Contact your Senator for HB 2007.  Contact your Representative and Senator for SB 291.


Sample messaging

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to express my support for (Pick a bill: SB 291 and/or HB 2007.)  (You can add some details about yourself or organization here.)

SB 291

The disparate impacts of the criminal justice system experienced by communities of color has significant, and negative consequences. An arrest or criminal record can have lifelong impacts on a person’s ability to access housing.

I support SB 291. Individualized assessments will give people who have a criminal history a chance at safe and stable housing.

HB 2007 (Already passed House. Contact Senators.)

Due to systemic racism, red lining, disparities in wealth and wages, people of color are less likely to own their home than their white peers. Homeownership is one of the best strategies to help families build intergenerational wealth, while providing a stable home.

I support HB 2007 so the Joint Task Force to Address Racial Disparities in Homeownership can continue to identify strategies which could reduce disparities.

Thank you.

Name

HB 2007 - Addressing Racial Disparities in Homeownership

Due to systemic racism, red lining, disparities in wealth and wages, people of color are less likely to own their home than their white peers. In Oregon, approximately 35% of Black people own their homes, compared to 65% of White people in Oregon. Homeownership is one of the best strategies to help families build intergenerational wealth, while providing a stable home. Strategies are needed to increase homeownership for BIPOC communities.

Initiated in 2018, the workgroup developed a set of recommendations  addressing bias training for real estate professionals, investment in down payment assistance, and investment in individual development accounts (IDAs) to support access to homeownership.

This bill just passed in the House and is going to the Senate.  Contact your Senator.

SB 291 - Individualized Assessment

People who rent their homes who have previous contact with the criminal justice system face additional barriers when trying to secure a new apartment. A landlord may discard their application automatically upon learning of a previous arrest or conviction, without considering the circumstances. Current federal law requires each tenant to be screened individually and assess their circumstances.

This proposal will require an individualized assessment by a landlord, and would prohibit landlords from screening people out for an arrest with no conviction, or previous criminal history for situations that are no longer illegal in Oregon.

Passed by the House Committee on Rules.  Contact your Representative and Senator.

Development, Preservation and Homeless Services bills

Bills before the Joint Committee on Ways and Means and/or Subcommittee on Capital Construction.

Sample Messaging

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to ask for your support for (Bill number), which (purpose).

Add some details about your organization here – name, geographic area served, mission, etc.

How would you use funding item you listed above? How could it help you? Share an example of how this resource could be important to your work.

This bill is in Ways & Means, and I am asking you today to advocate for and support this proposal.

Thank you,

Name

New Rental and Homeownership Development

SB 5505  - Local Innovation and Fast Track, or LIFT

Additional resources to develop regulated affordable housing are needed, including rental and homeownership opportunities. Since 2015, developers have successfully utilized general obligation bonds to build affordable housing through the Local Innovation and Fast Track, or LIFT Housing program. The Legislature should commit $250 million or more in general obligation bonds for this program.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

SB 5505  - Permanent Supportive Housing

We need to advocate to ensure that rent and services dollars for newly constructed projects approved in 2019 ($50 million in Article XI-Q      general obligation bonds) remain available to build permanent supportive housing across Oregon. The Legislature should commit $50 million or more plus rent and services funding in 2021-23.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Preservation and healthy homes

SB 5534 - Preserve and Maintain existing affordable housing

We need to maintain our supply of existing affordable housing, and reinvestment is needed to maintain safe, stable, and affordable homes. These funds are needed to help to maintain all regulated, multifamily affordable housing, as well as public housing and manufactured home parks. The Legislature should commit $100 million in Lottery Bonds to maintain existing affordable housing across Oregon.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2842 - Healthy Homes

Across Oregon, too many of our neighbors live in homes that may have fallen in disrepair or need small investments to improve their health and safety.  These investments help maintain stability, improve their health outcomes, and protect the housing stock in our communities for the next generation.

This proposal will create a Healthy Homes Program and Healthy Homes Repair Fund within the Oregon Health Authority, which will distribute grants to local governments, housing authorities, non-profit organizations, and Tribes to assist low income households with home repairs and retrofits. The proposal would also allow repairs of rental homes.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Homelessness services

HB 5011 - Prevent and End Homelessness (EHA/SHAP)

Across Oregon, we have an effective statewide system to distribute emergency rent assistance, rapid re-housing resources, and emergency shelter support through the Emergency Housing Account (EHA) and the State Homelessness Assistance Program (SHAP). Significant resources are needed to meet the needs of people experiencing housing instability. The Legislature should commit $50 million to support ongoing funding for these critical programs.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2544 - Supporting runaway and homeless youth

Oregon has one of the highest rates of youth homelessness, including youth in the K-12 system, youth exiting the foster care system, and unaccompanied youth. The Legislature should invest resources in expanding an existing host home network, which provides a home for unaccompanied homeless youth while they finish high school; and expand existing shelter, mental health, transitional housing, and other services for Runaway and Homeless Youth.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2163 - Long Term Rent Assistance Pilot for Former Foster Youth

In Oregon, three out of four households with extremely low incomes pay over half of their income towards rent. Today, half of youth who experience homelessness become adults who are chronically homeless, meaning they have years of homelessness coupled with disabling conditions.

This pilot proposal would provide $4.5 million to support youth who are no longer able to receive support through the foster care system with rent assistance. It seeks to provide stability and support to youth as they transition from childhood to adulthood so they can have access to the same education and training opportunities just like their counterparts who are housed and living with family.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Tax Credit and Property Tax Exemption bills

Sample Messaging

What to say to your Representative and Senator about your tax credit priorities:

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to express my support for (Pick one: HB 2584: the expansion of the Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit; HB 2096: The expansion of the Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit; HB 3364: A credit to help preserve existing affordable housing).

Add some details about your organization here – name, geographic area served, mission, etc.

How would you use the tax credit you listed above? How has it helped you? Share at least one example of a development you’ve built with the credit, and why it was critical to building that development.

If you’re planning to build a new development with the tax credit, please share that here. If you have land already built, and project plans, share two sentences about that – who will the project serve, how many units will it have, who is the target population.

This credit is critical to expanding housing opportunity in Oregon. I urge your support.

Thank you,

Name

HB 2584 - Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit

The Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit or OAHTC helps fund development and preservation of affordable housing. The Legislature should increase the cap to $35 million (currently $25 million) to develop and preserve more homes for people with low incomes. There are two proposed technical changes: first, to allow USDA Rural Development projects to take the credit over a 30-year period, not a 20-year period; and second, to allow more flexibility with rent assistance contracts to include local and state rent assistance to be included in the definition of rent assistance.

This bill is before the Joint Committee on Tax Expenditures.

HB 2096 and HB 2433 (omnibus bill) - Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit Expansion

Agricultural workers and their families are in need of safe and affordable homes to live in, either temporarily during harvest or permanently. Many agricultural workers live in substandard or overcrowded housing, while working hard to put food on the table for Oregon families. Oregon Housing and Community Services is seeking to increase the cap for the Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit. The credit is used to develop housing for agricultural workers both on farms and in the community. The current program is capped at $15 million per biennium, and the Governor’s Budget proposes to expand this to $24 million.

The HB 2433 omnibus bill passed in the House and is going to the Senate.  Contact your Senator.

HB 3364 - Preservation Tax Credit

Across Oregon, we need to maintain our supply of existing affordable housing, and reinvestment is needed to maintain safe, stable, and affordable homes. These funds are needed to help to maintain all regulated, multifamily affordable housing, as well as public housing and manufactured home parks. Additional tools are needed to maintain this housing. This proposal would create a tax credit to incentivize the sale of a building that meets the definition of publicly supported affordable housing (ORS 456.250) to a non-profit or a public housing authority, in order to maintain the housing as affordable.

This bill is before the Joint Committee on Tax Expenditures.

HB 2456 - Property Tax Exemption, Updates for affordable housing

Over the years, the Legislature has authorized several local option property tax exemptions for affordable housing, including ORS 307.515 and ORS 307.540. Local option property tax exemptions are one tool local jurisdictions can use to help incentivize and make affordable housing developments financially viable in their communities. Recently, the federal government made a critical change that will allow for more people of different income levels to be served by affordable housing. The Legislature should update the local option property tax exemptions to align with this new criteria.

This bill passed the House and referred to Senate Committee on Finance and Revenue Contact your Senator.

Questions? Need info?

Brian Hoop, Housing Oregon, 503-475-6056, brian@...


--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Andrew Olshin
 

Skip
Cascadia Clusters, BeaconPDX started work on a new, 10 unit village a few weeks ago.  Our architect, Sermin, is leading our efforts to work with BDS and appropriate City bureaus to review plans, etc. This will give us a template for future projects - that will benefit from the recent changes to City codes.  
We are developing a full set of construction plans for Beacon Village, and will apply for whatever permits are required.
What we need now is some discretionary private funding to pay for some architect time. 
Cheers, 

Andy Olshin

On Jun 20, 2021, at 2:08 PM, Skip Trantow <skiptrantow@...> wrote:



I think the feasibility of the Slavin Village project will depend upon two basic determinations: Can it pass city permitting requirements and can it be built at a low enough cost.  We want to make these determinations early on and I think this can be done with a conversation with Portland’s Bureau of Development Services (BDS) using their ‘Early Assistance’ service.  With this service you get a 15-minute (but hopefully more) video conference with a city planner/expert to describe the project and expose potential showstopper problems upfront.  (See: https://www.portland.gov/bds/zoning-land-use/early-assistance  Also:  https://www.portland.gov/construction-and-development ). By doing this, we also stand to build expertise on the overall process of creating a Tiny House Village (THV) that can be applied to future projects.


Here are design aspects (with my informal italicized comments) that
I think need to be considered in a discussion with the BDS:

  • Site Acquisition:   Assuming it’s legally possible for the city to repurpose this dead-end street, the site will likely be either free or very inexpensive. If we have to pay, say, $200K or more, for a lot to site a THV, I think the cost per bed will be too high to make the model work. The advantage of a THV should be in ‘development agility’, i.e., in our ability to build them inexpensively and quickly in places that are infeasible for conventional development – like Slavin Rd.
  • Design work:  Need to draft building plans adequate for BDS review and get the engineering stamp of approval.
  • Electrical and Water Utilities hook-up and distribution:  While it would be nice to go 'off-grid' and build a fully self-sufficient village, I don’t think this is feasible for a THV sited within the city. Yes, we could design in solar panels and a storage battery for electricity needs but when the winter cold temperatures come the units are going to need AC power for heat. The site would also need AC power for a washer and dryer.  So, solar power would be appropriate only to augment AC power and reduce electricity bills.  Regarding freshwater and wastewater utilities, you definitely need to hook into the City’s water and sewer systems (wastewater has to have somewhere to go).  Given its location, the Slavin Rd. site will likely be close to electrical and water access points. It is unlikely that there would be any unusual expense in running those utilities to and throughout the THV.
  •  Construction of walkways, common areas, and pads for housing unit placement:  The Slavin Rd. dead-end area might already be paved providing ready-to-go walkways and house pads.  Pavement and ground stability needs to be assessed.
  •  Housing Unit Fabrication and Installation:   The ideal model is: Off-site fabrication of finished tiny houses and common structures (e.g., kitchen, toilet, shower, and washing units).  Then transport units to site and place them onto ready ground pads.  All units to meet structural and safety standards and are inspected and approved at fabrication site before being transported to the site.  To speed up development time, off-site unit fabrication work is done in parallel with site preparation.   I think it is most cost effective to design living units that are built on skids.  Just trailer them in, slide them onto a pad. It appears that the new S2HC building codes may apply to THVs where the units are on wheels – is that correct?
  •  On-site construction of entry gate and any perimeter fencing needed for security:
  • On-site construction of garbage / recycling collection area: Likely just need a simple rectangular corral with doors.
  • Internet and Phone:  Internet and phone needs can likely be met through a single 5G wireless subscription that is WiFi’ed throughout the THV.
  • Parking:   Parking capacity needs to be investigated.  It looks like some parking space can be had on the public north end of Slavin Rd. before the barricade. 
  •  Life Safety / Fire Safety:  Acquisition and installation of fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, escape route signage

In the process of thinking about Tiny House Village design, I concluded that we really cannot design a THV and determine feasibility without first knowing what it is intended to achieve for its residents.  This led me to think that we probably need to define at least two THV types, each tailored to a particular need:  A short-term THV (STHV) intended for 0  - 2 year residencies, and a long-term/permanent residency THV (PTHV).  

The purpose of an STHV is to give a resident the breathing room to work toward getting into an apartment, whereas a PTHV is where a person can live for however long they want and create a community.  While a precise definition of the design of each THV type is needed, generally speaking, a living unit in an STHV would be small, spartan and the village would offer fewer community amenities (remember, it’s short-term).  You would likely squeeze as many STHV units as possible into a given site to get to the lowest cost-per-bed.  An STHV would probably be funded and managed by a public housing agency and have low or fully subsidized rent cost. 

A PTHV would have larger living units (though still tiny) that are aesthetic and comfortable with more community amenities, like patios, a commons area, workshop spaces, etc.  It would cost more to develop a PTHV, and rent would be higher.  Fewer living units per given site.  A PTHV could be publicly or privately funded and managed, and potentially, units could be privately owned.

As opposed to large apartment complexes and towers that make sense in purely economic terms (i.e., you can house more people per given lot size) with THV’s I believe we have the opportunity to favor humanistic terms and create housing that supports the innate desire to build community and be creative, something that I do not think large apartment complexes are conducive to.  I believe that, in many situations, a well-designed THV will foster the success of its residents to where the need for supporting social services is greatly lessened, representing a huge savings for the city over the long term.

Andy, what do you think about having a discussion with BDS Early Assistance?

Regards,

Skip Trantow

 

 


Re: Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Skip Trantow
 

I think the feasibility of the Slavin Village project will depend upon two basic determinations: Can it pass city permitting requirements and can it be built at a low enough cost.  We want to make these determinations early on and I think this can be done with a conversation with Portland’s Bureau of Development Services (BDS) using their ‘Early Assistance’ service.  With this service you get a 15-minute (but hopefully more) video conference with a city planner/expert to describe the project and expose potential showstopper problems upfront.  (See: https://www.portland.gov/bds/zoning-land-use/early-assistance  Also:  https://www.portland.gov/construction-and-development ). By doing this, we also stand to build expertise on the overall process of creating a Tiny House Village (THV) that can be applied to future projects.


Here are design aspects (with my informal italicized comments) that
I think need to be considered in a discussion with the BDS:

  • Site Acquisition:   Assuming it’s legally possible for the city to repurpose this dead-end street, the site will likely be either free or very inexpensive. If we have to pay, say, $200K or more, for a lot to site a THV, I think the cost per bed will be too high to make the model work. The advantage of a THV should be in ‘development agility’, i.e., in our ability to build them inexpensively and quickly in places that are infeasible for conventional development – like Slavin Rd.
  • Design work:  Need to draft building plans adequate for BDS review and get the engineering stamp of approval.
  • Electrical and Water Utilities hook-up and distribution:  While it would be nice to go 'off-grid' and build a fully self-sufficient village, I don’t think this is feasible for a THV sited within the city. Yes, we could design in solar panels and a storage battery for electricity needs but when the winter cold temperatures come the units are going to need AC power for heat. The site would also need AC power for a washer and dryer.  So, solar power would be appropriate only to augment AC power and reduce electricity bills.  Regarding freshwater and wastewater utilities, you definitely need to hook into the City’s water and sewer systems (wastewater has to have somewhere to go).  Given its location, the Slavin Rd. site will likely be close to electrical and water access points. It is unlikely that there would be any unusual expense in running those utilities to and throughout the THV.
  •  Construction of walkways, common areas, and pads for housing unit placement:  The Slavin Rd. dead-end area might already be paved providing ready-to-go walkways and house pads.  Pavement and ground stability needs to be assessed.
  •  Housing Unit Fabrication and Installation:   The ideal model is: Off-site fabrication of finished tiny houses and common structures (e.g., kitchen, toilet, shower, and washing units).  Then transport units to site and place them onto ready ground pads.  All units to meet structural and safety standards and are inspected and approved at fabrication site before being transported to the site.  To speed up development time, off-site unit fabrication work is done in parallel with site preparation.   I think it is most cost effective to design living units that are built on skids.  Just trailer them in, slide them onto a pad. It appears that the new S2HC building codes may apply to THVs where the units are on wheels – is that correct?
  •  On-site construction of entry gate and any perimeter fencing needed for security:
  • On-site construction of garbage / recycling collection area: Likely just need a simple rectangular corral with doors.
  • Internet and Phone:  Internet and phone needs can likely be met through a single 5G wireless subscription that is WiFi’ed throughout the THV.
  • Parking:   Parking capacity needs to be investigated.  It looks like some parking space can be had on the public north end of Slavin Rd. before the barricade. 
  •  Life Safety / Fire Safety:  Acquisition and installation of fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, escape route signage

In the process of thinking about Tiny House Village design, I concluded that we really cannot design a THV and determine feasibility without first knowing what it is intended to achieve for its residents.  This led me to think that we probably need to define at least two THV types, each tailored to a particular need:  A short-term THV (STHV) intended for 0  - 2 year residencies, and a long-term/permanent residency THV (PTHV).  

The purpose of an STHV is to give a resident the breathing room to work toward getting into an apartment, whereas a PTHV is where a person can live for however long they want and create a community.  While a precise definition of the design of each THV type is needed, generally speaking, a living unit in an STHV would be small, spartan and the village would offer fewer community amenities (remember, it’s short-term).  You would likely squeeze as many STHV units as possible into a given site to get to the lowest cost-per-bed.  An STHV would probably be funded and managed by a public housing agency and have low or fully subsidized rent cost. 

A PTHV would have larger living units (though still tiny) that are aesthetic and comfortable with more community amenities, like patios, a commons area, workshop spaces, etc.  It would cost more to develop a PTHV, and rent would be higher.  Fewer living units per given site.  A PTHV could be publicly or privately funded and managed, and potentially, units could be privately owned.

As opposed to large apartment complexes and towers that make sense in purely economic terms (i.e., you can house more people per given lot size) with THV’s I believe we have the opportunity to favor humanistic terms and create housing that supports the innate desire to build community and be creative, something that I do not think large apartment complexes are conducive to.  I believe that, in many situations, a well-designed THV will foster the success of its residents to where the need for supporting social services is greatly lessened, representing a huge savings for the city over the long term.

Andy, what do you think about having a discussion with BDS Early Assistance?

Regards,

Skip Trantow

 

 


Action Alerts from Housing Oregon - Affordable housing funding

Tim McCormick
 

please take a minute to contact your state legislators about any of these bills - it's the final 12 days of session.

Tip: if you don't know your state Senator and Representative or their contact info, you can look that up easily here:  
Copy it down and keep handy to contact them in future.

Also, consider getting on the mailing lists that most of them have, to find out about local Town Halls and what they are working on. Go to a Town Hall (online or in person), introduce yourself to the official and/or their chief of staff or housing advisor who'll likely be there, tell them briefly what you're most interested in and why, and any group(s) you advocate with (could be PDX Shelter Forum, eg). This probably helps later letters or testimony from you or your orgs have impact on them. It's a bit like Sales, you usually need many touch points, so to speak.
-Tim. 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Housing Oregon <housingoregon@...>
Date: Fri, Jun 18, 2021 at 11:34 AM
Subject: Action Alert - Affordable housing funding measures
To: Tim McCormick <housingoregon.org@...>



Final Weeks of Oregon Legislative Session

Contact your legislators on racial justice,  development, preservation, and homeless services funding bills

Now is the time to send a last message(s) to your State legislators to remind them how critical funding is needed for affordable housing, emergency shelters, and homeownership as the effects of the COVID pandemic continue to disproportionately affect low-income and Black, Indigenous and People of Color communities across Oregon. 

Reach out to your Representative and Senator to ask for their support on one or several of the bills listed below. If you have more time, consider reaching out to members of one of the Joint Committees considering these bills.

Housing Oregon is a member of the Oregon Housing Alliance. Check out our legislative agenda priorities and endorsements. Thanks to the Housing Alliance for legislation descriptions.

How to contact your Legislators

Racial Justice bills

Contact your Senator for HB 2007.  Contact your Representative and Senator for SB 291.


Sample messaging

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to express my support for (Pick a bill: SB 291 and/or HB 2007.)  (You can add some details about yourself or organization here.)

SB 291

The disparate impacts of the criminal justice system experienced by communities of color has significant, and negative consequences. An arrest or criminal record can have lifelong impacts on a person’s ability to access housing.

I support SB 291. Individualized assessments will give people who have a criminal history a chance at safe and stable housing.

HB 2007 (Already passed House. Contact Senators.)

Due to systemic racism, red lining, disparities in wealth and wages, people of color are less likely to own their home than their white peers. Homeownership is one of the best strategies to help families build intergenerational wealth, while providing a stable home.

I support HB 2007 so the Joint Task Force to Address Racial Disparities in Homeownership can continue to identify strategies which could reduce disparities.

Thank you.

Name

HB 2007 - Addressing Racial Disparities in Homeownership

Due to systemic racism, red lining, disparities in wealth and wages, people of color are less likely to own their home than their white peers. In Oregon, approximately 35% of Black people own their homes, compared to 65% of White people in Oregon. Homeownership is one of the best strategies to help families build intergenerational wealth, while providing a stable home. Strategies are needed to increase homeownership for BIPOC communities.

Initiated in 2018, the workgroup developed a set of recommendations  addressing bias training for real estate professionals, investment in down payment assistance, and investment in individual development accounts (IDAs) to support access to homeownership.

This bill just passed in the House and is going to the Senate.  Contact your Senator.

SB 291 - Individualized Assessment

People who rent their homes who have previous contact with the criminal justice system face additional barriers when trying to secure a new apartment. A landlord may discard their application automatically upon learning of a previous arrest or conviction, without considering the circumstances. Current federal law requires each tenant to be screened individually and assess their circumstances.

This proposal will require an individualized assessment by a landlord, and would prohibit landlords from screening people out for an arrest with no conviction, or previous criminal history for situations that are no longer illegal in Oregon.

Passed by the House Committee on Rules.  Contact your Representative and Senator.

Development, Preservation and Homeless Services bills

Bills before the Joint Committee on Ways and Means and/or Subcommittee on Capital Construction.

Sample Messaging

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to ask for your support for (Bill number), which (purpose).

Add some details about your organization here – name, geographic area served, mission, etc.

How would you use funding item you listed above? How could it help you? Share an example of how this resource could be important to your work.

This bill is in Ways & Means, and I am asking you today to advocate for and support this proposal.

Thank you,

Name

New Rental and Homeownership Development

SB 5505  - Local Innovation and Fast Track, or LIFT

Additional resources to develop regulated affordable housing are needed, including rental and homeownership opportunities. Since 2015, developers have successfully utilized general obligation bonds to build affordable housing through the Local Innovation and Fast Track, or LIFT Housing program. The Legislature should commit $250 million or more in general obligation bonds for this program.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

SB 5505  - Permanent Supportive Housing

We need to advocate to ensure that rent and services dollars for newly constructed projects approved in 2019 ($50 million in Article XI-Q      general obligation bonds) remain available to build permanent supportive housing across Oregon. The Legislature should commit $50 million or more plus rent and services funding in 2021-23.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Preservation and healthy homes

SB 5534 - Preserve and Maintain existing affordable housing

We need to maintain our supply of existing affordable housing, and reinvestment is needed to maintain safe, stable, and affordable homes. These funds are needed to help to maintain all regulated, multifamily affordable housing, as well as public housing and manufactured home parks. The Legislature should commit $100 million in Lottery Bonds to maintain existing affordable housing across Oregon.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2842 - Healthy Homes

Across Oregon, too many of our neighbors live in homes that may have fallen in disrepair or need small investments to improve their health and safety.  These investments help maintain stability, improve their health outcomes, and protect the housing stock in our communities for the next generation.

This proposal will create a Healthy Homes Program and Healthy Homes Repair Fund within the Oregon Health Authority, which will distribute grants to local governments, housing authorities, non-profit organizations, and Tribes to assist low income households with home repairs and retrofits. The proposal would also allow repairs of rental homes.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Homelessness services

HB 5011 - Prevent and End Homelessness (EHA/SHAP)

Across Oregon, we have an effective statewide system to distribute emergency rent assistance, rapid re-housing resources, and emergency shelter support through the Emergency Housing Account (EHA) and the State Homelessness Assistance Program (SHAP). Significant resources are needed to meet the needs of people experiencing housing instability. The Legislature should commit $50 million to support ongoing funding for these critical programs.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2544 - Supporting runaway and homeless youth

Oregon has one of the highest rates of youth homelessness, including youth in the K-12 system, youth exiting the foster care system, and unaccompanied youth. The Legislature should invest resources in expanding an existing host home network, which provides a home for unaccompanied homeless youth while they finish high school; and expand existing shelter, mental health, transitional housing, and other services for Runaway and Homeless Youth.

This bill is before the Subcommittee on Capital Construction of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

HB 2163 - Long Term Rent Assistance Pilot for Former Foster Youth

In Oregon, three out of four households with extremely low incomes pay over half of their income towards rent. Today, half of youth who experience homelessness become adults who are chronically homeless, meaning they have years of homelessness coupled with disabling conditions.

This pilot proposal would provide $4.5 million to support youth who are no longer able to receive support through the foster care system with rent assistance. It seeks to provide stability and support to youth as they transition from childhood to adulthood so they can have access to the same education and training opportunities just like their counterparts who are housed and living with family.

This bill is before the full Joint Committee on Ways and Means.

Tax Credit and Property Tax Exemption bills

Sample Messaging

What to say to your Representative and Senator about your tax credit priorities:

Dear (Legislator):

I am writing to you today to express my support for (Pick one: HB 2584: the expansion of the Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit; HB 2096: The expansion of the Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit; HB 3364: A credit to help preserve existing affordable housing).

Add some details about your organization here – name, geographic area served, mission, etc.

How would you use the tax credit you listed above? How has it helped you? Share at least one example of a development you’ve built with the credit, and why it was critical to building that development.

If you’re planning to build a new development with the tax credit, please share that here. If you have land already built, and project plans, share two sentences about that – who will the project serve, how many units will it have, who is the target population.

This credit is critical to expanding housing opportunity in Oregon. I urge your support.

Thank you,

Name

HB 2584 - Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit

The Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credit or OAHTC helps fund development and preservation of affordable housing. The Legislature should increase the cap to $35 million (currently $25 million) to develop and preserve more homes for people with low incomes. There are two proposed technical changes: first, to allow USDA Rural Development projects to take the credit over a 30-year period, not a 20-year period; and second, to allow more flexibility with rent assistance contracts to include local and state rent assistance to be included in the definition of rent assistance.

This bill is before the Joint Committee on Tax Expenditures.

HB 2096 and HB 2433 (omnibus bill) - Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit Expansion

Agricultural workers and their families are in need of safe and affordable homes to live in, either temporarily during harvest or permanently. Many agricultural workers live in substandard or overcrowded housing, while working hard to put food on the table for Oregon families. Oregon Housing and Community Services is seeking to increase the cap for the Agricultural Workforce Housing Tax Credit. The credit is used to develop housing for agricultural workers both on farms and in the community. The current program is capped at $15 million per biennium, and the Governor’s Budget proposes to expand this to $24 million.

The HB 2433 omnibus bill passed in the House and is going to the Senate.  Contact your Senator.

HB 3364 - Preservation Tax Credit

Across Oregon, we need to maintain our supply of existing affordable housing, and reinvestment is needed to maintain safe, stable, and affordable homes. These funds are needed to help to maintain all regulated, multifamily affordable housing, as well as public housing and manufactured home parks. Additional tools are needed to maintain this housing. This proposal would create a tax credit to incentivize the sale of a building that meets the definition of publicly supported affordable housing (ORS 456.250) to a non-profit or a public housing authority, in order to maintain the housing as affordable.

This bill is before the Joint Committee on Tax Expenditures.

HB 2456 - Property Tax Exemption, Updates for affordable housing

Over the years, the Legislature has authorized several local option property tax exemptions for affordable housing, including ORS 307.515 and ORS 307.540. Local option property tax exemptions are one tool local jurisdictions can use to help incentivize and make affordable housing developments financially viable in their communities. Recently, the federal government made a critical change that will allow for more people of different income levels to be served by affordable housing. The Legislature should update the local option property tax exemptions to align with this new criteria.

This bill passed the House and referred to Senate Committee on Finance and Revenue Contact your Senator.

Questions? Need info?

Brian Hoop, Housing Oregon, 503-475-6056, brian@...

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Elise Aymer
 

Thanks for explaining,  Peter.


On Wed, Jun 16, 2021, 7:28 PM Peter Finley Fry, <peter@...> wrote:

Land is owned by deed.  Portland (and other public agencies) can and do own land by deed.  A right of way (street) is a super easement across deeded land granted by the original subdivider to provide access to lots.

 

The easiest way to see this is on Portland Maps that clearly shows the deeded land (which are also tax lots) and the interconnected right of ways.  Portlandmaps will reveal the answer.  It is possible that the right of way extends but is not improved.  It is not uncommon for people to develop unimproved right of ways and extend a yard or garden into the right of way.  I know of a street in Corbett Terwilliger where every property along the street was built into the right of way. 

 

On deeded land, the owner can prohibit trespass of the land.  On right of way, public access can not be blocked or prohibited – i.e. public right of way can not be privatized by anyone – the city of private party without a public street vacation process.  Ironically, the city in the last few years made it almost impossible to vacate right of ways.  

 

These areas have a lot of conflict inherent in them.  In my world the laws are the bones and when the bones are broken or ignored then they cause the organism to fail.  I am trying to reduce the breakage so we can discuss the moral principles and not get sidetracked by litigation or illegal action even when innocent.  Keep in mind that there is no final judgement except death.   Litigation only stops when people fade away.  The Boise case provides a road sign, but it is not a definitive conclusion.

 

My observation, is that no one is really paying attention to reality.  It is no different then attempting to cross a desert without water.

 

The Salvin idea looks very interesting and conceptually  could work.

 

I would like to help to make it happen.

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elise Aymer via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 2:52 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

 

Hi Andy, Peter and Skip,

 

I very much appreciate Andy's plan and sharing it with the community here on the listserv.

 

Could you explain what your exchange a bit more. I'm not as versed in planning terms and land use and suspect there are others like me on the listserv.

 

Right now Slavin Street is a dead end. Is the land at the end of the dead end owned by the City? 

 

Or is the idea that it's being held by the City because although the road stops where the proposed village site would be it still counts as a right of way that in theory could be extended?

 

Is it that the land at the end of the dead end cannot be legally designated for another use as any other use than extending the road would be trumped by the rights of the property holders along the road?

 

I understood, I think, the part about how camps in right of way designated areas are seen to block right of passage and so to be an attempt to privatize public use.

 

Last question, does this mean that it would be necessary (with legalities in mind) to find a piece of City owned land for which they hold the title vs. a parcel such as on Slavin St. where they seem to hold usage in which to site villages?

 

Thanks a bunch, in advance for the clarification.

 

Elise

 

 

 


Re: Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Peter Finley Fry
 

Land is owned by deed.  Portland (and other public agencies) can and do own land by deed.  A right of way (street) is a super easement across deeded land granted by the original subdivider to provide access to lots.

 

The easiest way to see this is on Portland Maps that clearly shows the deeded land (which are also tax lots) and the interconnected right of ways.  Portlandmaps will reveal the answer.  It is possible that the right of way extends but is not improved.  It is not uncommon for people to develop unimproved right of ways and extend a yard or garden into the right of way.  I know of a street in Corbett Terwilliger where every property along the street was built into the right of way. 

 

On deeded land, the owner can prohibit trespass of the land.  On right of way, public access can not be blocked or prohibited – i.e. public right of way can not be privatized by anyone – the city of private party without a public street vacation process.  Ironically, the city in the last few years made it almost impossible to vacate right of ways.  

 

These areas have a lot of conflict inherent in them.  In my world the laws are the bones and when the bones are broken or ignored then they cause the organism to fail.  I am trying to reduce the breakage so we can discuss the moral principles and not get sidetracked by litigation or illegal action even when innocent.  Keep in mind that there is no final judgement except death.   Litigation only stops when people fade away.  The Boise case provides a road sign, but it is not a definitive conclusion.

 

My observation, is that no one is really paying attention to reality.  It is no different then attempting to cross a desert without water.

 

The Salvin idea looks very interesting and conceptually  could work.

 

I would like to help to make it happen.

 

 

 

Peter Finley Fry    AICP PhD MUP

Land Use Planning

Cultural Anthropologist

303 NW Uptown Terrace; Unit 1B

Portland, Oregon 97210

503 703-8033

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elise Aymer via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 2:52 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

 

Hi Andy, Peter and Skip,

 

I very much appreciate Andy's plan and sharing it with the community here on the listserv.

 

Could you explain what your exchange a bit more. I'm not as versed in planning terms and land use and suspect there are others like me on the listserv.

 

Right now Slavin Street is a dead end. Is the land at the end of the dead end owned by the City? 

 

Or is the idea that it's being held by the City because although the road stops where the proposed village site would be it still counts as a right of way that in theory could be extended?

 

Is it that the land at the end of the dead end cannot be legally designated for another use as any other use than extending the road would be trumped by the rights of the property holders along the road?

 

I understood, I think, the part about how camps in right of way designated areas are seen to block right of passage and so to be an attempt to privatize public use.

 

Last question, does this mean that it would be necessary (with legalities in mind) to find a piece of City owned land for which they hold the title vs. a parcel such as on Slavin St. where they seem to hold usage in which to site villages?

 

Thanks a bunch, in advance for the clarification.

 

Elise

 

 

 


Re: Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Elise Aymer
 

Hi Andy, Peter and Skip,

I very much appreciate Andy's plan and sharing it with the community here on the listserv.

Could you explain what your exchange a bit more. I'm not as versed in planning terms and land use and suspect there are others like me on the listserv.

Right now Slavin Street is a dead end. Is the land at the end of the dead end owned by the City? 

Or is the idea that it's being held by the City because although the road stops where the proposed village site would be it still counts as a right of way that in theory could be extended?

Is it that the land at the end of the dead end cannot be legally designated for another use as any other use than extending the road would be trumped by the rights of the property holders along the road?

I understood, I think, the part about how camps in right of way designated areas are seen to block right of passage and so to be an attempt to privatize public use.

Last question, does this mean that it would be necessary (with legalities in mind) to find a piece of City owned land for which they hold the title vs. a parcel such as on Slavin St. where they seem to hold usage in which to site villages?

Thanks a bunch, in advance for the clarification.

Elise


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