Date   

Slavin Village feasibility_210609.pdf

Andrew Olshin
 

Happy weekend. Please take a look at this when u get a chance and let me know what u think.





Thanks,
Andy Olshin


letter from Business for a Better Portland

Sally Bachman
 

FYI

 

Letter to City and County Leaders on Homeless Services Budget

https://bbpdx.org/updates/2021/6/3/letter-to-portland-leaders-on-homeless-services-budget?fbclid=IwAR3El-S1Tnwsme-0g9VLYsiiUM5Q6no3ls45QjeJBT-q1aCEB5zaT3lGO7M

 

June 3, 2021

 

Mayor Ted Wheeler
Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty
Commissioner Mingus Mapps
Commissioner Carmen Rubio
Commissioner Dan Ryan

 

Chair Deborah Kafoury
Commissioner Sharon Meiran
Commissioner Susheela Jayapal
Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson
Commissioner Lori Stegmann

Dear Chair Kafoury, Mayor Wheeler and Commissioners:

 

Business for a Better Portland is an innovative chamber of commerce that represents over 400 companies and organizations. Our unique approach to advocacy for business interests ensures that the volume of a member’s voice is not determined by the amount of their dues. Our advocacy for shared prosperity is guided by a fundamental understanding that the well-being of the business community is inherently tied to that of the entire community. One only needs to look at conditions on our streets to recognize that the rising income inequality which has fueled human suffering and social instability is not good for business. Our members look to us to navigate the complex and nearly impenetrable public policy arena on their behalf and to advocate for the policies and funding priorities that will benefit not only their immediate bottom line but also the social stability that will create greater shared prosperity for all.

 

Thank you for working together to allocate resources to both provide housing and services for people experiencing homelessness, as well as to establish near-term alternative safe camping options for people who currently have no choice but to sleep on the street. Homelessness is a problem our region has struggled with for decades. While its origins are traceable to the systematic defunding of the federal social safety net and neoliberal economic policies that have led to extreme income inequality, we must not let the scale of the problem deter us from taking decisive action to ameliorate the suffering of our fellow Portlanders who are in crisis and support our community’s businesses who also find themselves in crisis as they must step in as ad hoc social service and public safety providers.

 

Until recently, efforts to advance solutions have been stymied not only by a scarcity of resources, but also a lack of political will to accept the difficult trade-offs of short-term solutions. We applaud the arrival of your “all hands on deck” approach and hope it means that we are finally ready to prioritize action over the qualms of select constituencies. As City Commissioner Dan Ryan so aptly called out at last week’s meeting of the Executive Committee of the A Home For Everyone board, public demand for safe camping locations provides an excellent opportunity for our city’s private landowners to step up and participate in this critical community initiative. We trust that those who have been most insistent about the need for safe camping areas outside of downtown will be the first to step up and collaborate with the city to secure land for them. Intense, sustained and generous collaboration among all stakeholders will be required to ensure the success of these programs.

We were honored to play an active role in the HereTogether coalition that brought together a wide array of service providers, business leaders and community stakeholders to advance one of the most thoughtful and pragmatic responses to the housing crisis in the country. Passage of the measure in May 2020 was a watershed moment for our region. We fully support that vision, and remain committed to the philosophy that housing--not shelter--is the solution to homelessness. Housing is not only the most sensible and humane solution, it is also the most cost effective. As dozens of Portland-area business, government and community leaders learned during our 2018 “Best Practices Trip” to Brooklyn, New York, the New York City “right to shelter” approach costs billions to maintain and has become so vast that it requires its own police force. We must not fall prey to the temptation of simplistic solutions that put people out of sight but do not give them a safe place to call home.

Still, businesses and people living on the street alike are united in calling for safe, sanitary and organized places for people to go until they can be housed. The humanitarian crisis is plain for all to see, and constant political and community conflict over sweeps serves no one. We are at a pivotal moment now that multiple significant sources of funding are available to finally enable us to both operationalize the voter-supported vision of providing housing and supportive services to people who need them, as well as provide safe, sanitary and organized places for people to go until they can be housed.

 

Embracing the pragmatism of safe rest villages means letting go of ideal answers in the near term: we should never equate a tent or a pod with access to sanitation with housing. But how we build these safe rest villages can demonstrate our intent. Safe rest villages give us an opportunity to be more efficient and effective in how we get resources to people; they should never be mistaken for a solution in and of themselves. We must develop a village model that includes pathways out of them from the very beginning, which means supportive services must be co-located: employment, rental assistance and behavioral health resources are all essential if these villages are to succeed. It is also imperative that we distribute these villages equitably throughout the city, lest they become “out of sight, out of mind.”

As we evaluate any of these programs, we must choose metrics that align with our values, namely that housing is a human right. There may be stakeholders who suggest that the Martin v. Boise framework should set our Region’s and City’s guiding standard, but this is misguided. The so-called “standard” set by Martin vs. Boise is not something we should aspire to. The enduring value of that decision is that law enforcement tools will not fix homelessness. Penalizing people for living outside is a misguided and flatly unconstitutional strategy that falsely assumes that these people most directly impacted have any choice about where to go. In no sense is pure compliance with this important, yet failingly minimal, baseline set by the courts in line with the bold aspirations of our community. A focus on Martin v. Boise alone distracts from the imperative to secure the resources to offer people experiencing houselessness humane and voluntary options. Our goal as a city should be to create public environments that are conducive to commerce because they are welcoming for all, not ones that are defined by exclusion and enforcement. Rather than setting the low bar of available shelter beds, we should instead be striving for year over year decreases in unsheltered and chronic homelessness until we have successfully reached an end to homelessness.

 

We must invest not only in data collection, but in communications resources so that the public can clearly and regularly understand what progress is being made. We who have engaged closely on these issues see the passion and commitment of our elected leaders and their team members, and we see the staggering complication of these issues. We know that you have been asked to do too much with too little for too long. And yet we speak for our members who are beyond frustrated by our apparent inability to collectively improve appallingly bad conditions for both street-level businesses and people who have no choice but to subsist on those same streets. Besides the social and economic drivers of the ongoing housing crisis, there is nothing more detrimental to our efforts to address homelessness than the appearance of inaction and poor results. Confidence in government is approaching a nadir, and no time should be wasted in reversing that trend.

 

Thank you for your commitment to Portland and Multnomah County. We are grateful for your service and look forward to a better community for all.

 

Respectfully,

Ashley Henry, Executive Director

Business for a Better Portland (BBPDX)

 

Business for a Better Portland • 911 NE Davis Street, Portland, OR, 97232 • www.bbpdx.org

 

 


Beacon Village call for volunteers

jes.maran@...
 

Come help build Beacon Village at Bridgeport UCC! Calling all volunteers to spend a few hours build this alternative shelter village.

Beacon Village in partnership with Bridgeport United Church of Christ is building our first alternative shelter community with homes for up to fifteen residents in ten heated, powered, secure, hard-walled shelters, featuring a handmade shower & laundry trailer and open-air community living space.

Over the next month, we are requesting community support for our builder, Cascadia Clusters, as we build platforms and make other site improvements.

Choose a date/time-RSVP here!-Bring your enthusiasm and ANY level of skill! Visit beaconvillagepdx.org to learn more.

Thank you and kind regards,

Jes Maran
Beacon Village Board

 

 

 


Re: Opinions he on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Andrew Olshin
 

I’m downtown at 4th and Everett.  I’m watching the Central City concern / Downtown Clean and Safe street cleanup team.   And I’m wondering if Proud Ground isn’t the more direct route to getting folks off the streets.  Isn’t the contract for Clean and Safe up for grabs?  Open? Willing?

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Jun 7, 2021, at 10:35 AM, Donna Cohen <dcohen@...> wrote:



This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.

 

Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.

 

https://endhomelessness.org/resource/homeless-policy-in-the-recovery-plans-webinar/

 

Donna

 

Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd

Portland, Oregon

503-737-1425

dcohen@...

Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement

Webpage www.civicthinker.info

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Civics-for-Adults-1490728887922036/

“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

 

Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 

 

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:

Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.

 

I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.

 

I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)

 

Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers,

-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Donna Cohen
 

This webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, transcript and, especially, the SLIDES from the speaker from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities are very good.

 

Slides also suggest specific advocacy steps.

 

https://endhomelessness.org/resource/homeless-policy-in-the-recovery-plans-webinar/

 

Donna

 

Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd

Portland, Oregon

503-737-1425

dcohen@...

Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement

Webpage www.civicthinker.info

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Civics-for-Adults-1490728887922036/

“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Keliferous Goodwoman
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:11 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

 

Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 

 

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:

Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.

 

I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.

 

I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)

 

Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers,

-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Keliferous Goodwoman
 

Very cool! Have you checked out Health Care for the homeless? It started in Boston. 


On Thu, Jun 3, 2021, 11:01 AM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.

I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.

I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)

Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!

Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Jayme Delson
 

Hi Tommy and all,

Most people end up homeless due to lack of sufficient economic opportunities. For most this is a statement of the prevailing economy, not an issue rooted in their own failing. We can see this by the disappearance of the mass size middle class of the mid 20th century, having been now transformed into a mass size poor class of the 21st century.

I see nothing out there changing this long term trend. Given this, expecting to put the most vulnerable back into the prevailing economy through Transitional housing, Rapid rehousing, and Housing First, has proven to be largely ineffective over the last 40 years or so in establishing long term housed people.

I think its high time we deploy additional opportunities for all who wish. Given prevailing reality, we must work within the existing laws, until such time as we can change them.

Seek solutions that are low enough cost that they are within reach and can be scaled up.

That are uplifting, placing the individuals involved at the center of what is going on.

Making ends meet in the face of declining incomes, can be done if we produce for ourselves and with each other, an increasing portion of what we need.

People have done this throughout history, it was done in the US on a widespread basis as recently as 130 years ago. Currently the Amish do this, some land based intentional communities to this, people with bundles of money do this. The homeless have been forced to do this in the most untenable ways.

Imagine what some people, homeless and otherwise could do, if they were not on the run, all too often. And had modest access to materials to build tiny homes and cottages, opportunities to grow a garden, a place to work on things and perhaps run a small business of their choosing.

This can be done on a very low per person budget, if there were a team of people wanting to make it so. Clearly getting such an enterprise going will take some money, to get up and running. However done in a most cost conserving way, it can cost as little as 1/10 the cost of the other low cost options, and in time can be self sustaining.

When the wealthy need rest and drug rehab they go to beautiful places with cottages and nature.   When poor people need help they are filled with drugs and placed in a room with 4 white walls, this is not rehabilitation. 

Fortunately the garden and enjoying working on projects, with no pressure is.   

So that is a rendition of what I see as a viable option, what do you think?

Cheers,

Jayme

Jayme@...

On 6/3/2021 2:32 PM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Community segment left out of homeless debate

Amalie Roberts
 

Jeffrey, how wonderful to read this post.  At this moment, I am on a US road trip across the country sleeping in various configurations  of “home”  while I travel,  and visiting organizations that are attempting to address the world-wide  looming question of what to do about people living outside of a permanent physical structure.  The short of it is that People Living Outside exist in a wide range of configurations and all should be part of the larger conversations.  The younger people I meet don’t really have attachment to the idea of the end goal of a mortgage and a yard to mow but just a safe and comfortable place to sleep while trying to live a rich life.  Some talk about commune style arrangements.   Some family units have lived  outside of traditional housing structures generationally.  It is refreshing to hear their stories and again reimagine what the future looks like regarding the issues before us,  but we need to consider so many more ideas of what “shelter” can be.  Take care!

On Jun 2, 2021, at 8:20 PM, Jeffrey Liddicoat via groups.io <outsideartsale5@...> wrote:



On Wed, Jun 2, 2021 at 5:10 PM Jeffrey Liddicoat <outsideartsale5@...> wrote:
Hi,
I’m not directing this at you or in response to your recent article on the six proposed outdoor shelters. 
As far as I can tell when it comes to consideration of issues related to homelessness whether by policy makers, journalists, or even the general public, that part of the homeless community that I am a part of is seldom heard from, considered, or in the end properly or fairly dealt with in terms of public policy.
There is not an established label for the community segment I am concerned about. However they can be described as long term committed urban campers. They are not likely to ever sleep on a sidewalk or in a doorway. They tend to have a fair amount of belongings that provide shelter, comfort, privacy, and that are used to take care of bodily needs like food storage, preparation, and disposal. Similarly they tend to have practices or systems or even technologies to deal with other solid waste disposal issues, including appropriate ways of  doing bodily waste disposal. And since they tend to have a high quantity of belongings and stable consistent methods for meeting the needs of their lifestyle, they tend to be less transient than other homeless people. Indeed some members of this community are less transient than many of the so called ‘housed’ who move frequently from house to apartment, apartment to apartment. and even apartment to shared living space with other housed transients.
This begins to speak to why I don’t much care for either the term homeless or the term houseless. We usually don’t use standard tents either. Our shelters tend to be more substantial. We consider our shelters to be small houses and after living in the same place for a while that house becomes a home. 
Unfortunately it is consistently the case that our homes are torn away from us,
the materials and belongings we have used to survive and provide comfort are confiscated from us or destroyed and discarded.
Now as with these six outdoor shelters the whole aim is to provide a justification for brutal sweeps of the homeless The claim is that these or other shelters will make it so that no one need camp on public land or sidewalks or any other space once these 
government shelter areas are available.
And for some of those we call homeless these places will be a good thing and will provide better access to a secure rest area, hygiene services, and opportunities to connect with various agencies for jobs or more permanent housing.
But for many of the long term dedicated urban campers, being displaced by sweeps aimed at forcing us into shelters will represent huge decreases in the quality of shelter we have provided for ourselves.  And the pride we take in our shelter homes should not be dismissed. Nor is it a minor issue that this whole process will strip us of the dignity and freedom that many of us have fought for for many years.
A part of the reason (indeed it is a big part) 
I live outdoors is that as best as possible I want to avoid participation in the types of lifestyle choices that are now risking tremendous human suffering perhaps the collapse of civilization and maybe even a massive extinction event that includes humanity. It really isn’t debatable the homeless clearly have very low carbon footprints. So when it comes to threats to public health, policy makers and their public supporters might look a little closer at  their own reflections in a nearby mirror.
For my part I don’t just live outside I also work outside. (I won’t go into detail but I’ll attach examples of the wood work I do as well as some photos of my living space).
Many other urban campers have similar beliefs and practices that are not compatible with the public policy approaches outlined in your recent article.
Bottom-lines - we are not doing anything that is objectionable - we aren’t blocking sidewalks - if anything we help rid Portland of visible garbage - we dispose of waste, including bodily waste in ways that are responsible. We are far less criminal than some segments of the housed community.
Some of us just want to be left alone. Others seek as best as possible to contribute to the community through art or music or politics or with bicycle repair I or by directly helping out  their neighbor with food or childcare, or whatever is needed.
But for the urban camper (and many others who are homeless), past as well as current public policy takes none of that into account. Instead policies that diminish us, disrupt our ability to function, and destroy any hope we have in terms of making a contribution are the policies that get adopted.
And so as far as the future goes since we are once again not even considered or taken into account in the public discussion I know we will simply get more of the same.
We are victims.
Sorry I’m sending this without proofreading. It’s kind of long - maybe I should apologize for that as well.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
503 482 3188
OutsideArtSale@...
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<IMG_0726.jpeg>
<IMG_1615.jpeg>
<20200402_140436_Original.jpeg>
<20200512_034158_Original.jpeg>
<IMG_0948.jpeg>


Amalie Roberts
amalie@...


 You have the
right to breathe and remain
 Imagine
that
Rosamond S. King


Re: Community segment left out of homeless debate

Aisha Musa
 

Jeffrey (if I may),
Thank you for your thoughtful and detailed email. Yours is, indeed, a perspective that I have not heard expressed in the policy discussions. Do you have suggestions for ways that policies could recognize and include the segment of the community that you describe?

Dr. Aisha Y. Musa
AYM Education and Consulting, LLC









On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 9:49 PM Jeffrey Liddicoat <outsideartsale5@...> wrote:


On Wed, Jun 2, 2021 at 5:10 PM Jeffrey Liddicoat <outsideartsale5@...> wrote:
Hi,
I’m not directing this at you or in response to your recent article on the six proposed outdoor shelters. 
As far as I can tell when it comes to consideration of issues related to homelessness whether by policy makers, journalists, or even the general public, that part of the homeless community that I am a part of is seldom heard from, considered, or in the end properly or fairly dealt with in terms of public policy.
There is not an established label for the community segment I am concerned about. However they can be described as long term committed urban campers. They are not likely to ever sleep on a sidewalk or in a doorway. They tend to have a fair amount of belongings that provide shelter, comfort, privacy, and that are used to take care of bodily needs like food storage, preparation, and disposal. Similarly they tend to have practices or systems or even technologies to deal with other solid waste disposal issues, including appropriate ways of  doing bodily waste disposal. And since they tend to have a high quantity of belongings and stable consistent methods for meeting the needs of their lifestyle, they tend to be less transient than other homeless people. Indeed some members of this community are less transient than many of the so called ‘housed’ who move frequently from house to apartment, apartment to apartment. and even apartment to shared living space with other housed transients.
This begins to speak to why I don’t much care for either the term homeless or the term houseless. We usually don’t use standard tents either. Our shelters tend to be more substantial. We consider our shelters to be small houses and after living in the same place for a while that house becomes a home. 
Unfortunately it is consistently the case that our homes are torn away from us,
the materials and belongings we have used to survive and provide comfort are confiscated from us or destroyed and discarded.
Now as with these six outdoor shelters the whole aim is to provide a justification for brutal sweeps of the homeless The claim is that these or other shelters will make it so that no one need camp on public land or sidewalks or any other space once these 
government shelter areas are available.
And for some of those we call homeless these places will be a good thing and will provide better access to a secure rest area, hygiene services, and opportunities to connect with various agencies for jobs or more permanent housing.
But for many of the long term dedicated urban campers, being displaced by sweeps aimed at forcing us into shelters will represent huge decreases in the quality of shelter we have provided for ourselves.  And the pride we take in our shelter homes should not be dismissed. Nor is it a minor issue that this whole process will strip us of the dignity and freedom that many of us have fought for for many years.
A part of the reason (indeed it is a big part) 
I live outdoors is that as best as possible I want to avoid participation in the types of lifestyle choices that are now risking tremendous human suffering perhaps the collapse of civilization and maybe even a massive extinction event that includes humanity. It really isn’t debatable the homeless clearly have very low carbon footprints. So when it comes to threats to public health, policy makers and their public supporters might look a little closer at  their own reflections in a nearby mirror.
For my part I don’t just live outside I also work outside. (I won’t go into detail but I’ll attach examples of the wood work I do as well as some photos of my living space).
Many other urban campers have similar beliefs and practices that are not compatible with the public policy approaches outlined in your recent article.
Bottom-lines - we are not doing anything that is objectionable - we aren’t blocking sidewalks - if anything we help rid Portland of visible garbage - we dispose of waste, including bodily waste in ways that are responsible. We are far less criminal than some segments of the housed community.
Some of us just want to be left alone. Others seek as best as possible to contribute to the community through art or music or politics or with bicycle repair I or by directly helping out  their neighbor with food or childcare, or whatever is needed.
But for the urban camper (and many others who are homeless), past as well as current public policy takes none of that into account. Instead policies that diminish us, disrupt our ability to function, and destroy any hope we have in terms of making a contribution are the policies that get adopted.
And so as far as the future goes since we are once again not even considered or taken into account in the public discussion I know we will simply get more of the same.
We are victims.
Sorry I’m sending this without proofreading. It’s kind of long - maybe I should apologize for that as well.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
503 482 3188


Re: Community segment left out of homeless debate

Jeffrey Liddicoat <outsideartsale5@...>
 



On Wed, Jun 2, 2021 at 5:10 PM Jeffrey Liddicoat <outsideartsale5@...> wrote:
Hi,
I’m not directing this at you or in response to your recent article on the six proposed outdoor shelters. 
As far as I can tell when it comes to consideration of issues related to homelessness whether by policy makers, journalists, or even the general public, that part of the homeless community that I am a part of is seldom heard from, considered, or in the end properly or fairly dealt with in terms of public policy.
There is not an established label for the community segment I am concerned about. However they can be described as long term committed urban campers. They are not likely to ever sleep on a sidewalk or in a doorway. They tend to have a fair amount of belongings that provide shelter, comfort, privacy, and that are used to take care of bodily needs like food storage, preparation, and disposal. Similarly they tend to have practices or systems or even technologies to deal with other solid waste disposal issues, including appropriate ways of  doing bodily waste disposal. And since they tend to have a high quantity of belongings and stable consistent methods for meeting the needs of their lifestyle, they tend to be less transient than other homeless people. Indeed some members of this community are less transient than many of the so called ‘housed’ who move frequently from house to apartment, apartment to apartment. and even apartment to shared living space with other housed transients.
This begins to speak to why I don’t much care for either the term homeless or the term houseless. We usually don’t use standard tents either. Our shelters tend to be more substantial. We consider our shelters to be small houses and after living in the same place for a while that house becomes a home. 
Unfortunately it is consistently the case that our homes are torn away from us,
the materials and belongings we have used to survive and provide comfort are confiscated from us or destroyed and discarded.
Now as with these six outdoor shelters the whole aim is to provide a justification for brutal sweeps of the homeless The claim is that these or other shelters will make it so that no one need camp on public land or sidewalks or any other space once these 
government shelter areas are available.
And for some of those we call homeless these places will be a good thing and will provide better access to a secure rest area, hygiene services, and opportunities to connect with various agencies for jobs or more permanent housing.
But for many of the long term dedicated urban campers, being displaced by sweeps aimed at forcing us into shelters will represent huge decreases in the quality of shelter we have provided for ourselves.  And the pride we take in our shelter homes should not be dismissed. Nor is it a minor issue that this whole process will strip us of the dignity and freedom that many of us have fought for for many years.
A part of the reason (indeed it is a big part) 
I live outdoors is that as best as possible I want to avoid participation in the types of lifestyle choices that are now risking tremendous human suffering perhaps the collapse of civilization and maybe even a massive extinction event that includes humanity. It really isn’t debatable the homeless clearly have very low carbon footprints. So when it comes to threats to public health, policy makers and their public supporters might look a little closer at  their own reflections in a nearby mirror.
For my part I don’t just live outside I also work outside. (I won’t go into detail but I’ll attach examples of the wood work I do as well as some photos of my living space).
Many other urban campers have similar beliefs and practices that are not compatible with the public policy approaches outlined in your recent article.
Bottom-lines - we are not doing anything that is objectionable - we aren’t blocking sidewalks - if anything we help rid Portland of visible garbage - we dispose of waste, including bodily waste in ways that are responsible. We are far less criminal than some segments of the housed community.
Some of us just want to be left alone. Others seek as best as possible to contribute to the community through art or music or politics or with bicycle repair I or by directly helping out  their neighbor with food or childcare, or whatever is needed.
But for the urban camper (and many others who are homeless), past as well as current public policy takes none of that into account. Instead policies that diminish us, disrupt our ability to function, and destroy any hope we have in terms of making a contribution are the policies that get adopted.
And so as far as the future goes since we are once again not even considered or taken into account in the public discussion I know we will simply get more of the same.
We are victims.
Sorry I’m sending this without proofreading. It’s kind of long - maybe I should apologize for that as well.
Jeffrey Liddicoat
503 482 3188


Housing Innovation Collaborative

Skip Trantow
 

A nicely done website on housing ideas:





Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Tommy Kiser
 

Thanks Jeff. I appreciate you sharing your experience, and I agree, its unfortunate that we tend to be corralled politically into backing a one-size-fits-all approach, and that business interests are nearly always put ahead of the needs of people living on the street. Your home looks very comfortable and well-crafted, and I’m glad you are happy with it. I oppose sweeps and hate the harm they do to our communities.

I know there are many who are looking for help of various kinds in getting off the streets, or in living more comfortably and humanely in the situation they are in, and I’m just looking to support effective efforts and programs at both short and long term ways to improve this situation for those who want/need the help. This is why I reached out to this list for input. I value this community, and I’m always looking to learn more from anyone willing to share their thoughts. Thanks very much for sharing.

Cheers,
-Tommy





On Jun 3, 2021, at 7:53 PM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:

The answers have always been with folks who are trying to survive outside. Thank you for your email, Jeff. I so appreciated reading/hearing something so very real in this entire email thread. 
Mimi


On Jun 3, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Jeff Liddicoat <outsideartsale@...> wrote:


I could be wrong but I think every
very last one of you would stand mutely by while people like me get force fed whatever your favored approach is. But whether it’s Housing First, or alternative shelter, tiny house villages or self governed campgrounds, or outdoor shelters with wrap around services, I simply say no thank you - I’m good. I don’t want and don’t need what you have to offer. I like living by myself. Like most people I’d rather be governed by myself than by either the city or some self governing group or self appointed non profit. I don’t care to be on a path towards more substantial housing - that would just give me a more substantial carbon footprint. I like the structure I have built for myself. It provides privacy and protection from the elements. With what I save on utility bills I’ve provided myself with a heater an air conditioner and the best bedding money can buy. My outdoor location is also convenient for the art work I do and for the way I want to market that art. I could probably do better with my solid and other waste products - but then so could you. And when it comes to the issue of whether or not the homeless or the housed are a greater threat to public health - your carbon footprint alone is causing a loss for all of us. 
I’ve included some photos of the home I live inside the great outdoors. Chances are  in case of an earthquake I’d rather be in my place than in one of the high rise death traps that surround my place. It is an awfully urban setting but that is how I sell my art. And even though I’m in such an urban environment I’m much closer to the nature of things than my indoor neighbors. I live closer to the birds and ants and squirrels and mice and butterflies. I know every time it starts to rain I absorb the myriad patterns of rainfall in Oregon. Most of the time my neighbors are shielded from even knowing it’s raining. Meanwhile they are unshielded from the radon gases that build up in their overly sealed up structures. 
I’m satisfied with the aesthetics of my place inside and out. Just as I know I have less of a carbon footprint I know I have added more beauty than many of the housed around me some of them  one in the same with those who actively seek to have the homeless swept away because they are an eye sore and a threat to public health.
I realize many on this site have good intentions. But there are some who push for shelter and housing programs because they want a get tougher approach used on non-compliant campers like me. And I can’t help but be nervous when hardly a single seemingly good intentioned participant ever gives even a word of support but for forcing everyone into whatever their preferred final solution may be.
<IMG_1011.jpeg>
<IMG_0726.jpeg>

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:55 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
The sleeping pod/common building village model can work well as a transitional housing approach with on-site program/case management, but I could also see it working as a permanent housing approach with a cohousing model. 

Similar models could be done with tiny homes (on or off wheels, depending on jurisdiction) as a step up in individual amenities, with or without a common building.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
www.convergencearch.com



On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:32 PM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy







Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Mimi German
 

The answers have always been with folks who are trying to survive outside. Thank you for your email, Jeff. I so appreciated reading/hearing something so very real in this entire email thread. 
Mimi


On Jun 3, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Jeff Liddicoat <outsideartsale@...> wrote:


I could be wrong but I think every
very last one of you would stand mutely by while people like me get force fed whatever your favored approach is. But whether it’s Housing First, or alternative shelter, tiny house villages or self governed campgrounds, or outdoor shelters with wrap around services, I simply say no thank you - I’m good. I don’t want and don’t need what you have to offer. I like living by myself. Like most people I’d rather be governed by myself than by either the city or some self governing group or self appointed non profit. I don’t care to be on a path towards more substantial housing - that would just give me a more substantial carbon footprint. I like the structure I have built for myself. It provides privacy and protection from the elements. With what I save on utility bills I’ve provided myself with a heater an air conditioner and the best bedding money can buy. My outdoor location is also convenient for the art work I do and for the way I want to market that art. I could probably do better with my solid and other waste products - but then so could you. And when it comes to the issue of whether or not the homeless or the housed are a greater threat to public health - your carbon footprint alone is causing a loss for all of us. 
I’ve included some photos of the home I live inside the great outdoors. Chances are  in case of an earthquake I’d rather be in my place than in one of the high rise death traps that surround my place. It is an awfully urban setting but that is how I sell my art. And even though I’m in such an urban environment I’m much closer to the nature of things than my indoor neighbors. I live closer to the birds and ants and squirrels and mice and butterflies. I know every time it starts to rain I absorb the myriad patterns of rainfall in Oregon. Most of the time my neighbors are shielded from even knowing it’s raining. Meanwhile they are unshielded from the radon gases that build up in their overly sealed up structures. 
I’m satisfied with the aesthetics of my place inside and out. Just as I know I have less of a carbon footprint I know I have added more beauty than many of the housed around me some of them  one in the same with those who actively seek to have the homeless swept away because they are an eye sore and a threat to public health.
I realize many on this site have good intentions. But there are some who push for shelter and housing programs because they want a get tougher approach used on non-compliant campers like me. And I can’t help but be nervous when hardly a single seemingly good intentioned participant ever gives even a word of support but for forcing everyone into whatever their preferred final solution may be.
<IMG_1011.jpeg>
<IMG_0726.jpeg>

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:55 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
The sleeping pod/common building village model can work well as a transitional housing approach with on-site program/case management, but I could also see it working as a permanent housing approach with a cohousing model. 

Similar models could be done with tiny homes (on or off wheels, depending on jurisdiction) as a step up in individual amenities, with or without a common building.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
www.convergencearch.com



On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:32 PM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Jeff Liddicoat
 

I could be wrong but I think every
very last one of you would stand mutely by while people like me get force fed whatever your favored approach is. But whether it’s Housing First, or alternative shelter, tiny house villages or self governed campgrounds, or outdoor shelters with wrap around services, I simply say no thank you - I’m good. I don’t want and don’t need what you have to offer. I like living by myself. Like most people I’d rather be governed by myself than by either the city or some self governing group or self appointed non profit. I don’t care to be on a path towards more substantial housing - that would just give me a more substantial carbon footprint. I like the structure I have built for myself. It provides privacy and protection from the elements. With what I save on utility bills I’ve provided myself with a heater an air conditioner and the best bedding money can buy. My outdoor location is also convenient for the art work I do and for the way I want to market that art. I could probably do better with my solid and other waste products - but then so could you. And when it comes to the issue of whether or not the homeless or the housed are a greater threat to public health - your carbon footprint alone is causing a loss for all of us. 
I’ve included some photos of the home I live inside the great outdoors. Chances are  in case of an earthquake I’d rather be in my place than in one of the high rise death traps that surround my place. It is an awfully urban setting but that is how I sell my art. And even though I’m in such an urban environment I’m much closer to the nature of things than my indoor neighbors. I live closer to the birds and ants and squirrels and mice and butterflies. I know every time it starts to rain I absorb the myriad patterns of rainfall in Oregon. Most of the time my neighbors are shielded from even knowing it’s raining. Meanwhile they are unshielded from the radon gases that build up in their overly sealed up structures. 
I’m satisfied with the aesthetics of my place inside and out. Just as I know I have less of a carbon footprint I know I have added more beauty than many of the housed around me some of them  one in the same with those who actively seek to have the homeless swept away because they are an eye sore and a threat to public health.
I realize many on this site have good intentions. But there are some who push for shelter and housing programs because they want a get tougher approach used on non-compliant campers like me. And I can’t help but be nervous when hardly a single seemingly good intentioned participant ever gives even a word of support but for forcing everyone into whatever their preferred final solution may be.


On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:55 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
The sleeping pod/common building village model can work well as a transitional housing approach with on-site program/case management, but I could also see it working as a permanent housing approach with a cohousing model. 

Similar models could be done with tiny homes (on or off wheels, depending on jurisdiction) as a step up in individual amenities, with or without a common building.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
www.convergencearch.com



On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:32 PM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Joseph Purkey
 

The sleeping pod/common building village model can work well as a transitional housing approach with on-site program/case management, but I could also see it working as a permanent housing approach with a cohousing model. 

Similar models could be done with tiny homes (on or off wheels, depending on jurisdiction) as a step up in individual amenities, with or without a common building.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
www.convergencearch.com



On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 2:32 PM Tommy Kiser <tommy@...> wrote:
Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Tommy Kiser
 

Hmm, ok, thanks very much for this Jayme. I’m much newer to focused activism on this issue than probably most on this list, so I very much appreciate the added historical perspective.

Would you consider the village approach (individual shelters, shared services, etc.) to fall under the umbrella of “Housing First”? That is the sort of solution that seems most promising to me at this point if adopted widely. That’s the sort of thing I was hoping to advocate for with this message.

Of course I also realize no one approach will solve the entire problem, I’m also wholly in favor of more services/outreach to camps and meeting people where they are, while we work towards longer term solutions.

All that said, I realize this issue is insanely complex, and there’s no great way to boil it down to one or two sentences. But if you had a few seconds to give a very short message to a large audience, what would you say that you think might make an impact? (Maybe this is the question I should have asked this group to begin with.)

And thanks Donna for the background on the Alliance. Great to hear, and I look forward to watching the webinar you shared.

Cheers,
-Tommy




On Jun 3, 2021, at 1:52 PM, Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse.  

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme 

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:
I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.
 
Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 
From National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.
 
Donna
 
 
Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd
Portland, Oregon
503-737-1425
Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement
“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY
 
 
From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness
 
Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.
 
I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.
 
I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)
 
Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!
 
Cheers,
-Tommy


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Jayme Delson
 

Hi Tommy,

Housing first is Transitional housing without the barer to entry of substance abuse, this is a good upgrade in my opinion.

Sadly Transitional housing (housing first) in general has an poor track record on mid and longer term outcomes, in the cases that are tracked which are few.   (Under 20% remain housed longer than 6months or so)  its no ones fault, as you say living wage jobs are needed.  However if you think as i do, that that is not the prevailing long term trend, than how could this work?  I have watched this for 40 years now, its just getting worse. 

I am happy for the few it helps.  I am sad for the majority who are asked to trod the bridge to no where, over and over again.  To say nothing of the mental health impacts of the few who do gain housing, with no upward mobility, and 4 walls a TV,  no yard, no uplifting culture, or way out.  For most this is a perfect recipe  for depression or worse.

Thanks,

Jayme

On 6/3/2021 11:20 AM, Donna Cohen wrote:

I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.

 

Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 

From National Alliance to End Homelessness

https://endhomelessness.org/resource/homeless-policy-in-the-recovery-plans-webinar/

 

The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.

 

Donna

 

 

Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd

Portland, Oregon

503-737-1425

dcohen@...

Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement

Webpage www.civicthinker.info

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Civics-for-Adults-1490728887922036/

“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

 

Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.

 

I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.

 

I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)

 

Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers,

-Tommy


Re: Here’s the Cascadia Clusters proposal

Jim Krauel
 

Matt, 
Thank you for the suggestion.  It’s a good one.
Jim Krauel


On Jun 3, 2021, at 12:50 PM, Matthew Suplee <msuplee@...> wrote:


Don't mean to bump this old email chain but when Matthew's proposal came through months ago it made me think that there could be great benefit to a best practices document for anyone looking to start a village for unhoused people in Portland. Sort of a "quick-start" guide to layout, infrastructure requirements, ideas for shelters, municipal hurdles, legal stuff, etc. (Sunnyside Neighborhood Association looks to have a great start.) Does that exist already? Would that be beneficial? Is it worth the time investment? Not sure how this would play with Commissioner Ryan's new funding proposal through American Rescue Plan--maybe they already have people working on a document like this?

Just curious what the experts think? I'd be interested in facilitating this effort if it has teeth.

Matt

On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 9:07 AM Matthew Lembo <matt.lembo@...> wrote:
Here is what Sunnyside submitted.


On Mar 28, 2021, at 11:44 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:




Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Mar 28, 2021, at 8:29 AM, Matthew Lembo <matt.lembo@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I am part of the team that submitted proposals from the Sunnyside Neighborhood Association and Beacon Village and would be happy to participate in this discussion.

-Matt Lembo


On Mar 27, 2021, at 11:10 PM, Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:


Andy's idea of hosting an alternate space for the group proposals sounds like a great idea. 

Which of the groups on the list do you need contact info for? 

Some of the names seem like ones for which PDX Shelter Forum would already have connections.

If you have a shortlist of those for which you'd need contact info that would be a good starting point.

Elise

On Sat, Mar 27, 2021, 2:28 AM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
great idea Andy, and thanks so much for pulling that list of RFPQ respondents. I didn't realize this was possible from the procurement site, I was waiting for more from procurement analyst, Kathi Braeme-Burr.

we've been discussing ways to gather and cross-support proposers (and new collaborators) since before the last forum, this good movement forward.

Here's an open doc for this on the PDX Shelter Forum site (an unfolding experiment in open, collaborative, decentralized 'site' form using GDocs / Google Drive, by the way):
I've added to it the list of proposers from Andy.

If anyone here knows more about the proposals, or whom/how to contact the proposers, please share or add to document. We should be able to get a project listing, whats-needed, how-can-i-help, and discussion going here!
thanks, Tim. 



On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:05 PM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:
How about hosting a call asking all applicants to share their proposals and see what the community can do to come together around this important work

Proposals Received: 
Event Number RFPQ-76-2021 
Event Name: Alternative Shelter (Reissue)

ALL GOOD NORTHWEST 
BEACON VILLAGE 
Bridges to Change, Inc. 
CASCADIA CLUSTERS 
CATHOLIC CHARITIES 
CITY REPAIR PROJECT 
Courtesy inn motel 
Cultivate Initiatives 
Dignity Village, Inc. 
ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OREGON 
EQUITABLE GIVING CIRCLE 
FAMILY PROMISE OF METRO EAST 
GRAVES CHERYL 
GREATER GOOD NORTHWEST 
HELPING HANDS REENTRY OUTREACH 
CENTERS 
Holistic Healing Behavioral Healthcare 
LEE KYLE 
Matthew Suplee LLC 
MISHEEL LLC 
N/A (Hazelnut Grove) 
Operation Nightwatch 
Oregon Trail of Hope 
Pause for the Cause Creating Change 
POD the People 
Portland New Generations Rotary Club 
RIGHT 2 DREAM TOO 
RISING PHOENIX HOMES LLC 
SELF ENHANCEMENT, INC. 
STRAIGHTWAY SERVICES 
SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION 
TULBERG JOSHUA 
Volunteers of America Oregon, Inc.

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Mar 26, 2021, at 1:32 PM, Stanley Penkin <stanleypenkin@...> wrote:



I also received negative knee jerk reactions from people who only saw the word parks, but I do think the initial narrative could have been better defined.

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Barb Rainish
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 4:01 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Oregonian article followup on Shelter to Housing at City Council meeting Weds

 

I wish people would educate themselves and watch the city council meetings to get a better understanding.

 

This is frustrating because neighbors don't understand that the willy nilly camping they see and complain about can't be stopped unless there are acceptable and available (sanctioned) for them to go.

 

Thanks for all the advocacy!

 

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021, 3:57 PM David Groff via groups.io <dgroff45=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Earlier this week I posted on Nextdoor Woodstock the OPB article on S2HC and almost immediately received a bunch of negative replies.  My neighbors who posted, with one or two exceptions, are all convinced that the central idea is to put camps in parks.  I argued with them to no avail, which was discouraging to say the least.

 

David Groff

Interfaith Alliance on Poverty

 

On Friday, March 26, 2021, 03:33:52 PM PDT, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

 

 

To: PDX Shelter Forum

Bcc: Nicole Hayden, reporter, The Oregonian

Laura Gunderson, public editor, The Oregonian

followup article after Weds City Council meeting on Shelter to Housing Continuum: "Portland City Council assures residents that homeless quarters will not be allowed in parks"

https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2021/03/portland-city-council-assures-residents-that-homeless-quarters-will-not-be-allowed-in-parks.html.

Accompanied, like our Op-ed, by one of the most dismal-looking pictures I have ever seen of a permitted camp for the unhoused. It's also completely out of date, taken in November before these tents and pallets were fully replaced by Pallet Shelter units. 


My comments posted on it: 

1. the headline, opening, and tweet are misleading to inaccurate. Council is upholding use of parks Community Centers, parking lots, paved areas, this is not "not allowed in parks." 1/n

2. the reporter has repeatedly characterized proposals as for "semi-permanent structures". But tiny houses on wheels are permanent structures, also the @PDXshelterforum coalition in testimony over past year & Op-ed yesterday has called for allowing permanent structures & housing in
#S2HC 2/n. 

3. the reporter say "a handful of residents" opposed RV hookup reqs. But that opposition includes the Planning & Sustainability Commission & very wide community support including @PNWelcome, @catoregon, @SunrisePDX,
@PDXshelterforum etc. Why are *only* officials/staff's views presented? 3/3

Once again, as has been generally true of local news coverage of S2HC and related issues organized community/citizen advocacy has been largely erased from the story. 

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 




--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


<We Shine Communities RFPQ Submittal 4-1.pdf>


Re: Here’s the Cascadia Clusters proposal

Matthew Suplee
 

Don't mean to bump this old email chain but when Matthew's proposal came through months ago it made me think that there could be great benefit to a best practices document for anyone looking to start a village for unhoused people in Portland. Sort of a "quick-start" guide to layout, infrastructure requirements, ideas for shelters, municipal hurdles, legal stuff, etc. (Sunnyside Neighborhood Association looks to have a great start.) Does that exist already? Would that be beneficial? Is it worth the time investment? Not sure how this would play with Commissioner Ryan's new funding proposal through American Rescue Plan--maybe they already have people working on a document like this?

Just curious what the experts think? I'd be interested in facilitating this effort if it has teeth.

Matt


On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 9:07 AM Matthew Lembo <matt.lembo@...> wrote:
Here is what Sunnyside submitted.


On Mar 28, 2021, at 11:44 AM, Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:




Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Mar 28, 2021, at 8:29 AM, Matthew Lembo <matt.lembo@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I am part of the team that submitted proposals from the Sunnyside Neighborhood Association and Beacon Village and would be happy to participate in this discussion.

-Matt Lembo


On Mar 27, 2021, at 11:10 PM, Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:


Andy's idea of hosting an alternate space for the group proposals sounds like a great idea. 

Which of the groups on the list do you need contact info for? 

Some of the names seem like ones for which PDX Shelter Forum would already have connections.

If you have a shortlist of those for which you'd need contact info that would be a good starting point.

Elise

On Sat, Mar 27, 2021, 2:28 AM Tim McCormick, <tmccormick@...> wrote:
great idea Andy, and thanks so much for pulling that list of RFPQ respondents. I didn't realize this was possible from the procurement site, I was waiting for more from procurement analyst, Kathi Braeme-Burr.

we've been discussing ways to gather and cross-support proposers (and new collaborators) since before the last forum, this good movement forward.

Here's an open doc for this on the PDX Shelter Forum site (an unfolding experiment in open, collaborative, decentralized 'site' form using GDocs / Google Drive, by the way):
I've added to it the list of proposers from Andy.

If anyone here knows more about the proposals, or whom/how to contact the proposers, please share or add to document. We should be able to get a project listing, whats-needed, how-can-i-help, and discussion going here!
thanks, Tim. 



On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:05 PM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:
How about hosting a call asking all applicants to share their proposals and see what the community can do to come together around this important work

Proposals Received: 
Event Number RFPQ-76-2021 
Event Name: Alternative Shelter (Reissue)

ALL GOOD NORTHWEST 
BEACON VILLAGE 
Bridges to Change, Inc. 
CASCADIA CLUSTERS 
CATHOLIC CHARITIES 
CITY REPAIR PROJECT 
Courtesy inn motel 
Cultivate Initiatives 
Dignity Village, Inc. 
ECUMENICAL MINISTRIES OF OREGON 
EQUITABLE GIVING CIRCLE 
FAMILY PROMISE OF METRO EAST 
GRAVES CHERYL 
GREATER GOOD NORTHWEST 
HELPING HANDS REENTRY OUTREACH 
CENTERS 
Holistic Healing Behavioral Healthcare 
LEE KYLE 
Matthew Suplee LLC 
MISHEEL LLC 
N/A (Hazelnut Grove) 
Operation Nightwatch 
Oregon Trail of Hope 
Pause for the Cause Creating Change 
POD the People 
Portland New Generations Rotary Club 
RIGHT 2 DREAM TOO 
RISING PHOENIX HOMES LLC 
SELF ENHANCEMENT, INC. 
STRAIGHTWAY SERVICES 
SUNNYSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION 
TULBERG JOSHUA 
Volunteers of America Oregon, Inc.

Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On Mar 26, 2021, at 1:32 PM, Stanley Penkin <stanleypenkin@...> wrote:



I also received negative knee jerk reactions from people who only saw the word parks, but I do think the initial narrative could have been better defined.

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Barb Rainish
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 4:01 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: Re: [pdxshelterforum] Oregonian article followup on Shelter to Housing at City Council meeting Weds

 

I wish people would educate themselves and watch the city council meetings to get a better understanding.

 

This is frustrating because neighbors don't understand that the willy nilly camping they see and complain about can't be stopped unless there are acceptable and available (sanctioned) for them to go.

 

Thanks for all the advocacy!

 

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021, 3:57 PM David Groff via groups.io <dgroff45=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Earlier this week I posted on Nextdoor Woodstock the OPB article on S2HC and almost immediately received a bunch of negative replies.  My neighbors who posted, with one or two exceptions, are all convinced that the central idea is to put camps in parks.  I argued with them to no avail, which was discouraging to say the least.

 

David Groff

Interfaith Alliance on Poverty

 

On Friday, March 26, 2021, 03:33:52 PM PDT, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:

 

 

To: PDX Shelter Forum

Bcc: Nicole Hayden, reporter, The Oregonian

Laura Gunderson, public editor, The Oregonian

followup article after Weds City Council meeting on Shelter to Housing Continuum: "Portland City Council assures residents that homeless quarters will not be allowed in parks"

https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2021/03/portland-city-council-assures-residents-that-homeless-quarters-will-not-be-allowed-in-parks.html.

Accompanied, like our Op-ed, by one of the most dismal-looking pictures I have ever seen of a permitted camp for the unhoused. It's also completely out of date, taken in November before these tents and pallets were fully replaced by Pallet Shelter units. 


My comments posted on it: 

1. the headline, opening, and tweet are misleading to inaccurate. Council is upholding use of parks Community Centers, parking lots, paved areas, this is not "not allowed in parks." 1/n

2. the reporter has repeatedly characterized proposals as for "semi-permanent structures". But tiny houses on wheels are permanent structures, also the @PDXshelterforum coalition in testimony over past year & Op-ed yesterday has called for allowing permanent structures & housing in
#S2HC 2/n. 

3. the reporter say "a handful of residents" opposed RV hookup reqs. But that opposition includes the Planning & Sustainability Commission & very wide community support including @PNWelcome, @catoregon, @SunrisePDX,
@PDXshelterforum etc. Why are *only* officials/staff's views presented? 3/3

Once again, as has been generally true of local news coverage of S2HC and related issues organized community/citizen advocacy has been largely erased from the story. 

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 




--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


<We Shine Communities RFPQ Submittal 4-1.pdf>


Re: Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

Donna Cohen
 

I recently saw a webinar from the National Alliance to End Homelessness. Yes, they are a good group.

 

Homeless Policy in the Recovery Plans (recorded webinar) May 12, 2021 

From National Alliance to End Homelessness

https://endhomelessness.org/resource/homeless-policy-in-the-recovery-plans-webinar/

 

The webpage has a video of the webinar, a transcript and a set of excellent slides from the second speaker, who was from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities.

 

Donna

 

 

Donna L Cohen, MLIS, MEd

Portland, Oregon

503-737-1425

dcohen@...

Civics for Adults – and Others – Workshops: To Enhance Civic Knowledge and Inspire Political Engagement

Webpage www.civicthinker.info

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Civics-for-Adults-1490728887922036/

“My philosophy is very simple. When you see something that is not fair, not right, not just – stand up, say something, speak up!” Rep. John Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6lzPpqc2WY

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tommy Kiser
Sent: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:02 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Opinions on National Alliance to End Homelessness

 

Hi all - really appreciate everyone on this list and all you’re doing to make real change for our unhoused and housing-unstable neighbors.

 

I just wanted to solicit some opinions from the group. I’m making a short film right now that’s meant to make a statement on houselessness, and I was looking for a website to link to in the credits for good explanations of housing-first solutions, and the importance/efficacy of them. The potential audience is national (not local/state level). The call to action is to support housing-first solutions and living wage jobs, and to demand the same of elected leaders.

 

I found the National Alliance to End Homelessness (https://endhomelessness.org/), and from the website it looks like they have some really good data and messaging around the topic. Anyone here have any experience with them? I looked them up on Charity Navigator and they have a good score there for fiscal transparency and accountability. Mainly want to do some due diligence and make sure they are a worthy org to drive traffic to before I highlight their site. (Not that I expect millions of viewers here, this is just a personal project, but nonetheless.)

 

Any thoughts or opinions are welcome and appreciated. Also if you have any other organizations or web resources to suggest, please send them my way. Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers,

-Tommy

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