Date   

Re: Help Needed at Jason Barns Landing Village, St. Johns

Mimi German
 

Thank you for the repost, Elise. If folks want a tour or to meet folks, please get in touch. We need all the support we can get. 


On May 19, 2021, at 3:25 PM, Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:


In light of what Tim McCormick posted about impending city sweeps, I'm reposting Mimi German's appeal for help at the Jason Barns Landing (JBL) Village (tarpee community) in St. Johns (Portland).

The recent announcements may not pertain directly to JBL but they are pretty much just waiting for the shoe to drop as they don't currently have any assurances from the Housing Bureau that they can stay on the premises until the planned construction there starts.

From Mimi:

"When we first set up, we were on Parks land. The Housing Bureau came out to tell us that this was their land. The goat people told us it was their land. The Housing Bureau told us they'd have us arrested for trespass if we stayed. We told them that folks are considered trespassing no matter what land houseless are living on. And we let them know that because there's nowhere to go, we aren't going anywhere. She explained the deal that the HB had struck w/ the city which was that they purchased the land from the City. We asked to see the contract because the land wasn't listed as HB land. Days later, the maps changed to HB land or some such thing. HB told us that they were going to put up the low-income or affordable housing units and that's when we told them that when that happens and the trucks are there and ready to dig, we'd move. Weeks later, the fence contractor came in to let us know, about the impending sweep and fence set-up.

So, yes. To your questions.
Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?
We are trying to contact as many groups as possible for eviction defense. I think it's important to get lists of folks ready to act/support as soon as a warning is posted and we don't when that will be. What I do know is that folks are not leaving the site because they are tired of being swept with nowhere to go.

Letters: It would be great to have details from the HB as to when those trucks are truly coming in so that if the folks at the site do want to leave, we can plan for that for a specified time. We'd also like letters to the HB telling them not to arrest us for trespass since there is no dig happening.

Calls/Petitions
Yes and yes. Calls to the HB and calls to the County and City Council to allow us to stay at least until the dig and then once the dig occurs, creating a safe sweepless space for us on the cut or in St Johns, for us to carry on with our tarpee village.

Protests.
Absolutely. We did tell the HB that if a fence was dropped, we'd have a recurrence of protest in support of our houseless friends, at the site. I reminded them of last years protests and our feelings about protecting houseless people from sweeps. We are putting together support for protests and need all the help we can get. Again, as soon as a trespass or eviction notice goes up, we begin.

Food/Donations/Etc.
We need $ for tarpee materials.  Also need carpet ends for folks for future tarpees and/or marmoleum for the floors.

We have a cashapp which is $JBLcommunity. [my emphasis]

Folks are doing ok on food. We do need lots of water.

Mostly, need folks to come by to see where it is so they can come when we need them there for support. You can get to the site via N. Macrum (off of Lombard) then one block to Oberlin. Oberlin dead-ends at the Cut. Walk into the trail and folks will see the tarpee village to the left. It's on the S. side of the Peninsula Crossing Trail aka The Cut.

We also need people who can help us build tarpees. Folks w/ some experience w/ carpentry is best. We do the builds in the Alameda area. Our build team is small and everyone has lives, so the builds take a long time. If we have more people who can put some time in, we can build these very quickly. We basically have these on templates now.

Could also use some therapists for folks, not social workers.  It's been a request.

TO ALL INTERESTED in lending a hand in some way or another, thank you so very much.

Mimi
503-453-9005 [my emphasis]
"
Earlier Mimi wrote,"Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone."

Elise

Note: Tarpees are low-budget teepee structures covered in polyethylene tarp versus the traditional leather. Invented by Paul Cheoketen Wagner, of the Saanich First Nation of Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada), they were used to good effect during the Standing Rock protests https://seattleglobalist.com/2016/11/30/standing-rock-seattle-tarpees-winter/59706 . Mimi wrote in her earlier e-mail that JBL had help from a member of the Salish Nation (Washington State) in creating their tarpees. The Salish have also used tarpees as part of their land protection efforts. https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/state-patrol-takes-power-tools-to-indigenous-structures-arrests-two-in-olympia-climate-protest/


Help Needed at Jason Barns Landing Village, St. Johns

Elise Aymer
 

In light of what Tim McCormick posted about impending city sweeps, I'm reposting Mimi German's appeal for help at the Jason Barns Landing (JBL) Village (tarpee community) in St. Johns (Portland).

The recent announcements may not pertain directly to JBL but they are pretty much just waiting for the shoe to drop as they don't currently have any assurances from the Housing Bureau that they can stay on the premises until the planned construction there starts.

From Mimi:

"When we first set up, we were on Parks land. The Housing Bureau came out to tell us that this was their land. The goat people told us it was their land. The Housing Bureau told us they'd have us arrested for trespass if we stayed. We told them that folks are considered trespassing no matter what land houseless are living on. And we let them know that because there's nowhere to go, we aren't going anywhere. She explained the deal that the HB had struck w/ the city which was that they purchased the land from the City. We asked to see the contract because the land wasn't listed as HB land. Days later, the maps changed to HB land or some such thing. HB told us that they were going to put up the low-income or affordable housing units and that's when we told them that when that happens and the trucks are there and ready to dig, we'd move. Weeks later, the fence contractor came in to let us know, about the impending sweep and fence set-up.

So, yes. To your questions.
Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?
We are trying to contact as many groups as possible for eviction defense. I think it's important to get lists of folks ready to act/support as soon as a warning is posted and we don't when that will be. What I do know is that folks are not leaving the site because they are tired of being swept with nowhere to go.

Letters: It would be great to have details from the HB as to when those trucks are truly coming in so that if the folks at the site do want to leave, we can plan for that for a specified time. We'd also like letters to the HB telling them not to arrest us for trespass since there is no dig happening.

Calls/Petitions
Yes and yes. Calls to the HB and calls to the County and City Council to allow us to stay at least until the dig and then once the dig occurs, creating a safe sweepless space for us on the cut or in St Johns, for us to carry on with our tarpee village.

Protests.
Absolutely. We did tell the HB that if a fence was dropped, we'd have a recurrence of protest in support of our houseless friends, at the site. I reminded them of last years protests and our feelings about protecting houseless people from sweeps. We are putting together support for protests and need all the help we can get. Again, as soon as a trespass or eviction notice goes up, we begin.

Food/Donations/Etc.
We need $ for tarpee materials.  Also need carpet ends for folks for future tarpees and/or marmoleum for the floors.

We have a cashapp which is $JBLcommunity. [my emphasis]

Folks are doing ok on food. We do need lots of water.

Mostly, need folks to come by to see where it is so they can come when we need them there for support. You can get to the site via N. Macrum (off of Lombard) then one block to Oberlin. Oberlin dead-ends at the Cut. Walk into the trail and folks will see the tarpee village to the left. It's on the S. side of the Peninsula Crossing Trail aka The Cut.

We also need people who can help us build tarpees. Folks w/ some experience w/ carpentry is best. We do the builds in the Alameda area. Our build team is small and everyone has lives, so the builds take a long time. If we have more people who can put some time in, we can build these very quickly. We basically have these on templates now.

Could also use some therapists for folks, not social workers.  It's been a request.

TO ALL INTERESTED in lending a hand in some way or another, thank you so very much.

Mimi
503-453-9005 [my emphasis]
"
Earlier Mimi wrote,"Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone."

Elise

Note: Tarpees are low-budget teepee structures covered in polyethylene tarp versus the traditional leather. Invented by Paul Cheoketen Wagner, of the Saanich First Nation of Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada), they were used to good effect during the Standing Rock protests https://seattleglobalist.com/2016/11/30/standing-rock-seattle-tarpees-winter/59706 . Mimi wrote in her earlier e-mail that JBL had help from a member of the Salish Nation (Washington State) in creating their tarpees. The Salish have also used tarpees as part of their land protection efforts. https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/state-patrol-takes-power-tools-to-indigenous-structures-arrests-two-in-olympia-climate-protest/


Re: SWHRL meeting tonight to feature speakers on homelessness solutions used in LA and Philadelphia, 7-8:30 PM

Tim McCormick
 

thank you Sally for this event announcement, sounds very interesting. Today 7pm, on Zoom 

Prof R. Scott Mitchell, co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter,

I've read this book, and also discuss the project MADWORKSHOP it describes, in my book in progress, Village Buildings
(http://VillageBuildings.housing.wiki) -- particularly, in comparison to the somewhat similar POD Initiative project in Portland. 



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:52 AM Sally Bachman <Sarahbach@...> wrote:

You don't need to live in the Southwest Hills Residential League (SWHRL) area to tune in to this meeting. All are welcome to join via zoom. -- Sincerely, Sally Bachman

 

Featuring:

Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis;

 

and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 

Details below:

 

 

https://mailchi.mp/dec056816c9f/come-to-our-neighborhood-meeting-april-6179729?e=590b354feb

 

 

SWHRL Neighborhood Meeting

 

Wednesday, May 19

7:00-8:30 pm

 

Featuring expert speakers from across the US on successful methods for addressing homelessness 

 

On Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87205573096?pwd=aWtYUXFPMFc3L2RTWjhTemptYkRudz09

 

We hope you can join us at the SWHRL members' meeting this Wednesday at 7:00 PM on Zoom. This is an important annual meeting to elect the Board and set the direction for the year ahead.

In addition, Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis; and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 
Please invite your neighbors. (If you are not yet a member but live or work in the SWHRL neighborhood, just send an email with your name and address to contact@....) We want to hear what YOU want from your neighborhood association!
 

We are looking for new Board members


Qualifications:

  • Membership in SWHRL
  • Passion for our neighborhood and city
  • Willingness to pitch in

If you are interested in serving or want more information, contact president@....
 

Hope to see you on the 19th!
 

PSA: Ride Connection invites you to check out its new Travel Options Tool at https://rideconnection.org/services/travel-options-tool to see what travel options serve your area and best suit your needs. 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


SWHRL meeting tonight to feature speakers on homelessness solutions used in LA and Philadelphia, 7-8:30 PM

Sally Bachman
 

You don't need to live in the Southwest Hills Residential League (SWHRL) area to tune in to this meeting. All are welcome to join via zoom. -- Sincerely, Sally Bachman

 

Featuring:

Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis;

 

and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 

Details below:

 

 

https://mailchi.mp/dec056816c9f/come-to-our-neighborhood-meeting-april-6179729?e=590b354feb

 

 

SWHRL Neighborhood Meeting

 

Wednesday, May 19

7:00-8:30 pm

 

Featuring expert speakers from across the US on successful methods for addressing homelessness 

 

On Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87205573096?pwd=aWtYUXFPMFc3L2RTWjhTemptYkRudz09

 

We hope you can join us at the SWHRL members' meeting this Wednesday at 7:00 PM on Zoom. This is an important annual meeting to elect the Board and set the direction for the year ahead.

In addition, Prof R. Scott Mitchell, USC School of Architecture and co-author of Give Me Shelter https://www.oroeditions.com/product/give-me-shelter, will discuss Los Angeles' use of pre-fabricated transitional housing to tackle the homelessness crisis; and Dr. Bob Davis, formerly co-manager of a city hospital's Drug & Alcohol Detox Unit, will talk about Philadelphia’s successful program for providing homeless people the necessary services enable them to move into stable, long-term housing.
 
Please invite your neighbors. (If you are not yet a member but live or work in the SWHRL neighborhood, just send an email with your name and address to contact@....) We want to hear what YOU want from your neighborhood association!
 

We are looking for new Board members


Qualifications:

  • Membership in SWHRL
  • Passion for our neighborhood and city
  • Willingness to pitch in

If you are interested in serving or want more information, contact president@....
 

Hope to see you on the 19th!
 

PSA: Ride Connection invites you to check out its new Travel Options Tool at https://rideconnection.org/services/travel-options-tool to see what travel options serve your area and best suit your needs. 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...>
 

No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Tim McCormick
 

the Oregonian's lead politics writer, clarifies that a reader is wrong in pointing out something possibly wrong about an article if the paper has or does subsequently alter it online.

One must grant, ongoing maintenance work is to be expected from, not protested to, the local ministry of news, to keep the public discussion and first draft of history going smoothly. 

I mean, it's hard work, the truth business! Reminds me of this story by. oh, forgot the name. 

"With the deep, unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent him from uttering when his day's work started, Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles. Then he unrolled and clipped together four small cylinders of paper which had already flopped out of the pneumatic tube on the right-hand side of his desk. 



In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for written messages, to the left, a larger one for newspapers; and in the side wall, within easy reach of Winston's arm, a large oblong slit protected by a wire grating. This last was for the disposal of waste paper. Similar slits existed in thousands or tens of thousands throughout the building, not only in every room but at short intervals in every corridor. For some reason they were nicknamed memory holes. When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or even when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building. 



Winston examined the four slips of paper which he had unrolled. Each contained a message of only one or two lines, in the abbreviated jargon -- not actually Newspeak, but consisting largely of Newspeak words -- which was used in the Ministry for internal purposes. They ran: 



times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify 



times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue 



times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify 



times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling 



With a faint feeling of satisfaction Winston laid the fourth message aside. It was an intricate and responsible job and had better be dealt with last. The other three were routine matters, though the second one would probably mean some tedious wading through lists of figures. 



Winston dialled 'back numbers' on the telescreen and called for the appropriate issues of The Times, which slid out of the pneumatic tube after only a few minutes' delay. The messages he had received referred to articles or news items which for one reason or another it was thought necessary to alter, or, as the official phrase had it, to rectify. For example, it appeared from The Times of the seventeenth of March that Big Brother, in his speech of the previous day, had predicted that the South Indian front would remain quiet but that a Eurasian offensive would shortly be launched in North Africa. As it happened, the Eurasian Higher Command had launched its offensive in South India and left North Africa alone. It was therefore necessary to rewrite a paragraph of Big Brother's speech, in such a way as to make him predict the thing that had actually happened. Or again, The Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones. As for the third message, it referred to a very simple error which could be set right in a couple of minutes. As short a time ago as February, the Ministry of Plenty had issued a promise (a 'categorical pledge' were the official words) that there would be no reduction of the chocolate ration during 1984. Actually, as Winston was aware, the chocolate ration was to be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty at the end of the present week. All that was needed was to substitute for the original promise a warning that it would probably be necessary to reduce the ration at some time in April..."



On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:31 AM Betsy Hammond <betsyhammond@...> wrote:
No, Tim, you've got it wrong: The reporter went out and GOT the quotes/reaction from folks camping on the streets. It's been added. We wanted to post the city's change in tactic as soon as it was made public.

Betsy Hammond




Betsy Hammond

Editor, politics, education and Portland team

o. 503.294.7623

@chalkup

@OregonianPol

OregonLive.com/education

OregonLive.com/politics





 




From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:25 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments
 
Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

ann mcmullen
 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim McCormick
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 11:26 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Cc: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

 

Oregonian:

"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."

little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."

[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 

 

Portland Mercury:

"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."

Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

 

Bcc: 

--

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 


Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments

Tim McCormick
 

Joint statement from all 5 members of City Council, from 9:05am:

Oregonian:
"Portland announces it will aggressively clean or remove homeless encampments."
little more than the City press release, except put behind Oregonian subscribers-only paywall, and with an aggressive tendentious headline. 

"The city released the new rules at 9 a.m. The Oregonian|OregonLive is seeking comment from people experiencing homelessness and others likely to be affected by the change."
[but what a bad idea, from a public standpoint, to suggest that people submit comment privately into an unaccountable & opaque mailbox drop, to possibly be allegedly referred to hours or days later. When they could send it to PDX Shelter Forum and assuredly have it be instantly seen by hundreds of the people in city most interested to hear and ready to act, and also the newspapers]. 
 
Portland Mercury:
"City Updates Guidelines for Clearing Homeless Camps During COVID."
Policy annlouncement from HUCIRP department which overseas this: 

No story or post I've seen mentions the crucial context that Oregon bill #HB3115 looks to be on the verge of passing, which would make OR cities subject to legal action for having (like Portland) on the books a camping/sleeping prohibition endorceable even without adequate alternative places available to sleep/camp:

Bcc: 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: [NOW!] today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg

Suzanne Huffman
 

Greetings from a lurker down the road from my former home in PDX. Many of you may know that we have an impending crisis in Salem, with the mayor and city council intending to reinstate a camping ban and more. We are expecting city-wide sweeps to start any day now, possibly even before the June 1 date of implementation.

 

Honesty, I am addressing this forum because I let myself and my friends in a strategic planning think tank get distracted by a local guy who insisted that he had the best, most cost-efficient rapid re-housing design. Turns out he is so deeply invested in being the victim of misunderstanding and in protecting his plans from others stealing them that actually executing them is an abstraction.  

 

My ask today: could members of this forum shoot me directly your best ideas for rapid re-housing? Something we can pull off, even small-scale, as a demo project? FYI, I am an avid camper and will be pitching the SUV tent on the back of my VW Sportwagen on Saturday, agreed to help with snacks for a city park/Riverkeepers clean up project, and I may stay for the duration.

 

If you ae willing to join our FB group, we would love to have you!

 

Peace,

 

Suzanne Lynn Huffman, PhD

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Tim McCormick
Sent: Tuesday, May 18, 2021 2:59 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] [NOW!] today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg

 

Reminder: AHFE Safety Off the Streets meeting starting 3pm


Google Meet meeting link:  meet.google.com/svq-vkja-ykr.
Phone: 1 484-424-4823  (PIN: 661 453 175#)

Agenda for May 18, 2021:

  • 15 min 1. Welcome & Introductions - All
  • 30 min 2. Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 Proposed Budget Overview - Adam Brown
  • 30 min 3. Program Spotlight: Trash for Peace, Ground Score Association - Trash for Peace Staff
  • 30 min 4. Shelter to Housing Continuum Project Overview Eric Engstrom
  • 15 min 5. General Updates & Announcements - All


--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Date: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 2:45 PM
Subject: today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg
To: <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>

 

please join today for 3-5pm monthly, open meeting of the Safety Off the Streets Workgroup, a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board of A Home For Everyone:  
   Google Meet:  meet.google.com/svq-vkja-ykr

   Phone: 1 484-424-4823  (PIN: 661 453 175#)

Also, we now have an open document to gather info and meeting notes etc about SOS Workgroup:  http://sosw.pdxshelterforum.org. You are welcome to take notes from the  meeting here, this helps out those who can't attend. 


You can add this to your calendar with this Calendar Event (for recurring meeting). This is now on the new PDX Shelter Forum public Google Calendar, which you can subscribe to to get notice of all events like this that we add. 

 

AGENDA
15 min - 1. Welcome & Introductions - All
45 min - 2. Strategic Planning Engagement - Joshua Bates,Paul Stark
15 min - 3. Severe Weather Response Update Celeste Duvall
15 min - 4. General Updates & Announcements All

 

ABOUT SOS
Safety Off the Streets Workgroup is the shelter, immediate-response focused part, and advisory group, of the county homelessness administrative authority (A Home For Everyone). So it's a key place, in terms of funding / general policy, where many of us in PDX Shelter Forum might engage given our interests here. See 'About SOS'' below for more about it. 

 

http://ahomeforeveryone.net/safety-off-the-streets-workgroup.
"In October 2014, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup was created as a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board and charged with developing an action plan, that prioritized strategies for increasing options for safety and a good night’s sleep, such that no women, children, or adults with disabilities have to sleep on the streets of Multnomah County by January 2017. The action plan includes policy and funding recommendations from the workgroup’s analysis of the need and what it would take to build a system to begin to address that need. [...]

"Going forward, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup will oversee implementation of shelter development, coordinated entry, best practices strategy, monitor new shelter initiatives, develop public spaces engagement/management strategies, oversee severe weather response, oversee development and implementation of street and shelter count methodology, and shape safety off the streets related budget recommendations."

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 

 


[NOW!] today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg

Tim McCormick
 

Reminder: AHFE Safety Off the Streets meeting starting 3pm

Google Meet meeting link:  meet.google.com/svq-vkja-ykr.
Phone: 1 484-424-4823  (PIN: 661 453 175#)

Agenda for May 18, 2021:

  • 15 min 1. Welcome & Introductions - All
  • 30 min 2. Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 Proposed Budget Overview - Adam Brown
  • 30 min 3. Program Spotlight: Trash for Peace, Ground Score Association - Trash for Peace Staff
  • 30 min 4. Shelter to Housing Continuum Project Overview Eric Engstrom
  • 15 min 5. General Updates & Announcements - All

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...>
Date: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 2:45 PM
Subject: today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg
To: <pdxshelterforum@groups.io>


please join today for 3-5pm monthly, open meeting of the Safety Off the Streets Workgroup, a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board of A Home For Everyone:  
   Google Meet:  meet.google.com/svq-vkja-ykr
   Phone: 1 484-424-4823  (PIN: 661 453 175#)
Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 2.42.53 PM.png
Also, we now have an open document to gather info and meeting notes etc about SOS Workgroup:  http://sosw.pdxshelterforum.org. You are welcome to take notes from the  meeting here, this helps out those who can't attend. 

You can add this to your calendar with this Calendar Event (for recurring meeting). This is now on the new PDX Shelter Forum public Google Calendar, which you can subscribe to to get notice of all events like this that we add. 

AGENDA
15 min - 1. Welcome & Introductions - All
45 min - 2. Strategic Planning Engagement - Joshua Bates,Paul Stark
15 min - 3. Severe Weather Response Update Celeste Duvall
15 min - 4. General Updates & Announcements All

ABOUT SOS
Safety Off the Streets Workgroup is the shelter, immediate-response focused part, and advisory group, of the county homelessness administrative authority (A Home For Everyone). So it's a key place, in terms of funding / general policy, where many of us in PDX Shelter Forum might engage given our interests here. See 'About SOS'' below for more about it. 

http://ahomeforeveryone.net/safety-off-the-streets-workgroup.
"In October 2014, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup was created as a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board and charged with developing an action plan, that prioritized strategies for increasing options for safety and a good night’s sleep, such that no women, children, or adults with disabilities have to sleep on the streets of Multnomah County by January 2017. The action plan includes policy and funding recommendations from the workgroup’s analysis of the need and what it would take to build a system to begin to address that need. [...]

"Going forward, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup will oversee implementation of shelter development, coordinated entry, best practices strategy, monitor new shelter initiatives, develop public spaces engagement/management strategies, oversee severe weather response, oversee development and implementation of street and shelter count methodology, and shape safety off the streets related budget recommendations."

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Article: Homeless Oaklanders were tired of the housing crisis. So they built a ‘miracle’ village

Elise Aymer
 

Thanks, Mimi and Jim for specifying what the village needs and the urgency.

Elise

On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 2:36 PM Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:
Hi, Elise. Thank you for inquiring.

When we first set up, we were on Parks land. The Housing Bureau came out to tell us that this was their land. The goat people told us it was their land. The Housing Bureau told us they'd have us arrested for trespass if we stayed. We told them that folks are considered trespassing no matter what land houseless are living on. And we let them know that because there's nowhere to go, we aren't going anywhere. She explained the deal that the HB had struck w/ the city which was that they purchased the land from the City. We asked to see the contract because the land wasn't listed as HB land. Days later, the maps changed to HB land or some such thing. HB told us that they were going to put up the low-income or affordable housing units and that's when we told them that when that happens and the trucks are there and ready to dig, we'd move. Weeks later, the fence contractor came in to let us know, about the impending sweep and fence set-up.

So, yes. To your questions.
Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?
We are trying to contact as many groups as possible for eviction defense. I think it's important to get lists of folks ready to act/support as soon as a warning is posted and we don't when that will be. What I do know is that folks are not leaving the site because they are tired of being swept with nowhere to go.

Letters: It would be great to have details from the HB as to when those trucks are truly coming in so that if the folks at the site do want to leave, we can plan for that for a specified time. We'd also like letters to the HB telling them not to arrest us for trespass since there is no dig happening.

Calls/Petitions
Yes and yes. Calls to the HB and calls to the County and City Council to allow us to stay at least until the dig and then once the dig occurs, creating a safe sweepless space for us on the cut or in St Johns, for us to carry on with our tarpee village.

Protests.
Absolutely. We did tell the HB that if a fence was dropped, we'd have a recurrence of protest in support of our houseless friends, at the site. I reminded them of last years protests and our feelings about protecting houseless people from sweeps. We are putting together support for protests and need all the help we can get. Again, as soon as a trespass or eviction notice goes up, we begin.

Food/Donations/Etc.
We need $ for tarpee materials.  Also need carpet ends for folks for future tarpees and/or marmoleum for the floors.

We have a cashapp which is $JBLcommunity.

Folks are doing ok on food. We do need lots of water.

Mostly, need folks to come by to see where it is so they can come when we need them there for support. You can get to the site via N. Macrum (off of Lombard) then one block to Oberlin. Oberlin dead-ends at the Cut. Walk into the trail and folks will see the tarpee village to the left. It's on the S. side of the Peninsula Crossing Trail aka The Cut.

We also need people who can help us build tarpees. Folks w/ some experience w/ carpentry is best. We do the builds in the Alameda area. Our build team is small and everyone has lives, so the builds take a long time. If we have more people who can put some time in, we can build these very quickly. We basically have these on templates now.

Could also use some therapists for folks, not social workers.  It's been a request.

TO ALL INTERESTED in lending a hand in some way or another, thank you so very much.

Mimi
503-453-9005


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:06 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
Hi Mimi,

I understood from your post that the immediate peril for the village will be the city's "clean up" sweep that could come at any time. 

- Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?

- Does the village need financial support or donations of food or other goods? Is there anything like a GoFundMe to which we could contribute?

I am asking as not everyone on this list is local and not all of us are able to get out to the village for a tour or to be active on-site alongside the residents but may still want to help. 

Elise

On Wed, May 12, 2021 at 9:18 AM Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:
Before explaining the tarpee village in St Johns, I'd like to tell you about Jason Barns Landing which is the name of the tarpee village.

Jason Barns was a houseless person in St Johns. I met him about 5 years ago freezing in the icy rain at Safeway. I got him clothes from truck and helped him change out of his wet pants and shirt. He had plastic bags on his feet instead of socks because he had no socks. We became very close that year, and I made sure, as did others, to know where Jason was sleeping on the street and make sure he was alive. He was one of our most vulnerable on our streets. He came to one day, in tears, pleading w/ me to build a village for him and his street family. He knew he'd die on the streets if they didn't have a village. I brought him w/ me to talk to Wheeler---we both knew Wheeler would lie to him, but there's something about being able to speak truth to power anyway. The story around that is long and I won't delve into it here other than to say that of course, Wheeler lied.  Jason died on Willamette Blvd just before Thanksgiving in 2018 while canning. The unhoused community that I am a part of as their advocate, made a commitment to follow through on a village in memory of Jason. While we had tried to "follow the rules" while Jason was alive, we didn't succeed. Soon after, Jason Barns Landing became a reality.


Not very updated FB page of JBL: https://www.facebook.com/JASONBARNSLANDING

JBL, as it's known to us, was a self-determined village put up w/ the help of others like myself who know that the city process kills houseless people while it slugs its way through bureaucracy. Folks on the street don't have time to wait. Waiting is a luxury only the wealthy can live through. The initial JBL village was put up on the north side of the Peninsula Trail at Columbia. We had 2 toilets bought and pre-paid by a business owner in St Johns, for a year! But Nick Fish had the toilet company remove them. So we got them again. Nick Fish had them removed. Again. Nick Fish sent out the goon squad of Park Rangers and Cops on a weekly basis to threaten our women (and men), assault our Black female resident with racial epithets, and threaten all of us w/ jail time. Weekly. We lasted for 9 months even throughout all of this. By winter we decided due to the daily harassment by the city, we should disband for a bit and come together again in the future.

That time has come. After sweep after sweep, our friends from JBL and others on the Cut, have had enough. They asked for another village, especially since they were lied to about the St Johns Village that's across the street from the SJCC. That village was never for us. We all knew that. For years, we've known that.

Enter the tarpees. We spoke to a man who's part of the Salish tribes in WA who designed tarpees for Standing Rock. After many zoom mtgs w/ him over the pandemic timeline, he gave us his blessing to use his design for BIPOC unhoused people and also anyone who is unhoused and not BIPOC. My friends on the streets in SJ are fed up w/ sweeps. Absolutely fed up. So we set up on an unused piece of land on the Cut next to the spot where they recently were swept into...from the North side, back to the South side. As it turns out, although the plot of land was Parks land when we set up, it's now the Housing Bureau's land, supposedly allocated to a new build for low-income housing. On day 1 of the tarpee build when we installed 2 tarpees, the HB came out to tell us we were trespassing. We informed them that no matter where houseless people are, they are trespassing, according to the city. So what? We also told them that if it's true that this low-income housing is going to go up  for folks who are BIPOC and were gentrified out of PDX, that we'd leave when the trucks came to begin the dig, but not before that. It could take years before the actual dig occurs.

Yesterday, we put up the 4th tarpee. The folks occupying the tarpees are like new people! Their sense of self-worth is back. They can stand inside the tall tarpee. They have built in beds and a built in table. They are beautiful. And we can move them when or if we have to. The fence company came yesterday to line out where the huge fence will be put up. The guy told us that a sweep will happen in the next 2 weeks sometime. We are not leaving. This is why we need support. The notion that sweeping people is a way to "handle" the "situation" is not tenable for unhoused people. In this case, it's the Housing Bureau unhousing unhoused people and as we told them on day 1, we aren't leaving until the trucks come to do the dig. This can buy us a lot of time which means more stability for folks in the village.

As of now, we have a doctor on board for our folks in JBL. He's a friend of mine and he is now the doctor on call for our people. We are connecting people to services they are in need of, as they ask for services they want.

The tarpee team and JBL need your support now to help us stay put until the dig happens. No one knows when that day will come.

Please reach out to me if you want to help. I'd love to take you around to meet folks at the camp.
My number is 503-453-9005. Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone. Old school. I'm 57.

With love and hope of support...

Mimi



On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 7:10 PM Sharron Fuchs <sharronfuchs@...> wrote:
Could you please explain the Tarpee Village? 

Sharron

On May 11, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:

Would anyone want to help us with our Tarpee Village in St Johns? 


On May 11, 2021, at 2:13 PM, Jim Krauel <jimmykrauel@...> wrote:


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:55 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
I love and have been following group behind this project Cob on Wood. Also  love how it connects to Portland where many people are intrigued by and have explored similar cob building methods. (traditional methods of mixed straw, mud, sand construction, often employing rounded and hand-molded forms, to create highly insulating, fire-safe, strong, inexpensive structures. 

The City of Portland has been exceptionally accommodating in allowing cob building in city code, fairly uniquely among US cities as far  as I understand. 

There are cob structures in various places around town, such as a seating/hut area at Portland State University near the corner of one building on the East edge of Park Blocks. 

I used to live just a few blocks away from the location of this "miracle village" in West Oakland -- which for those unfamiliar is a distinct area and city council district near NW corner of Oakland, to the west of downtown Oakland, that includes where the Bay Bridge and BART train tunnels connect San Francisco to the East Bay. (or, connect the West Bay to Oakland, as Oaklanders often prefer to say). As well as major port and military logistics operations, and container cranes (key local icon).

Overall it is a quite amazing environment -- Oaklandish! as a local civic group and culture/apparel brand's name says --  with heavy industry mixed with old residential, easy hop one stop on BART train to downtown San Francisco, and a kind of widespread laboratory of living and building approaches. It's tragic and wounded, in ways, such as West Oakland being entirely redlined and blight-designated for many decades, from which it is just now recovering; the huge scale of homelessness, and terrible conditions a lot of people are in; and the widespread displacement of poorer and minority populations occurring in last 10-15 years. 

At the same time, as this article highlights one case of, it's also long been a very creative, generative, even joyous and liberatory environment where all kinds of wide-ranging social and living, progressive  exploration occurs, and has for 150+ years. West Oakland had a well-established major Black community back to the late 19thC, became an important national center of Black society, culture, communication because it was the endpoint of the Transcontinental railroad, and home base for the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a key Black institution. Many of these porters were able to save money and buy homes in West Oakland, one of the relatively few urban areas in the country where that was possible, and this helped seed generations of Black community and enterprise there.. 

West Oakland was a key founding center and base for the Black Panther Party, and other extraordinary social organizing movements. Including more recently the Moms 4 Housing occupation & organizing for housing rights, which began with occupation of a vacant, investor-owned house on Magnolia Street under 2 blocks from where I lived.

Apologies for my effusion -- the area around the village featured in Guardian article means a lot of time, gives me a lot of ongoing inspiration and food for thought though I haven't been there in person for 2.5 years. I am currently putting together an essay / chapter about West Oakland shelter/housing explorations, for the Village Buildings project (see: villagebuildings.housing.wiki), and may visit and stay there in the next few weeks on a trip to California. 
Anyway, great article, thank you Angie for sharing. 
cheers, Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:27 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
Tucked under a highway overpass in West Oakland, just beyond a graveyard of charred cars and dumped debris, lies an unexpected refuge. There’s a collection of beautiful, small structures built from foraged materials. There’s a hot shower, a fully stocked kitchen and health clinic. There’s a free ...

View the article.
https://flip.it/PyyeTI

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/NLGevU

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: Santa Cruz City Council restricts camping in most of city, once safe sleeping sites available

Keith Wilson
 

Tim,

Thank you for sharing. It is nice to see the city taking responsibility for “safe sleeping sites.” The words imply they will most likely focus on tents. This is the first time I have seen a city note the importance of storage. Safety and security of belongings are critical to unsheltered souls building to the next step. While it is a start, not adding shower or full hygiene services (bathrooms, laundry) is short sighted and not as comprehensive as needed to help improve outcomes.

Keith

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim McCormick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 11:51 AM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] Santa Cruz City Council restricts camping in most of city, once safe sleeping sites available

 

The Santa Cruz City Council on Tuesday approved a homeless ordinance that restricts camping in most parts of the city, also anywhere in daytime, but requires a safe sleeping program and daytime storage before the rules can take effect.
https://goodtimes.sc/santa-cruz-news/santa-cruz-city-council-approves-ordinance-homeless-camping/.

 

"The package of rules, called the “Camping Services and Standards Ordinance,” prohibits most camping in the city, a rule that will take effect when the city establishes at least 150 “safe sleeping sites.”  It is unclear where those will be located, but under the ordinance they will not be located next to schools. They also cannot be placed adjacent to residential neighborhoods, but it was not clear Tuesday how that will be determined."

I'd guess this ordinance generally predicts others that will be passed in many cities all over the West Coast and other high-homelessness areas. 

It's a contrast to Proposition B that just passed in Austin, which bans camping everywhere in city unless it's a designated parks-department campground, but doesn't require that there be any or sufficient such campgrounds. 

How that makes sense, i.e. where people would go, seems to be a generally unanswered question; as is, how this would pass the 8th Amendment constitutionality tests upheld by the 9th Circuit Court, should a court binding upon Austin / Texas (e.g., the US 5th Circuit Court) rule similarly.

--

Tim McCormick

Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative

Portland, Oregon 


Re: Article: Homeless Oaklanders were tired of the housing crisis. So they built a ‘miracle’ village

Jayme Delson
 

Hi Mimi and Elise, 

Thank you Mimi for your work with the homeless in the Tarpees Village. 

I am all for emergency versions, evolving into permanent solutions.

Sincerely,

Jayme


On 5/13/2021 11:05 AM, Elise Aymer wrote:
Hi Mimi,

I understood from your post that the immediate peril for the village will be the city's "clean up" sweep that could come at any time. 

- Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?

- Does the village need financial support or donations of food or other goods? Is there anything like a GoFundMe to which we could contribute?

I am asking as not everyone on this list is local and not all of us are able to get out to the village for a tour or to be active on-site alongside the residents but may still want to help. 

Elise

On Wed, May 12, 2021 at 9:18 AM Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:
Before explaining the tarpee village in St Johns, I'd like to tell you about Jason Barns Landing which is the name of the tarpee village.

Jason Barns was a houseless person in St Johns. I met him about 5 years ago freezing in the icy rain at Safeway. I got him clothes from truck and helped him change out of his wet pants and shirt. He had plastic bags on his feet instead of socks because he had no socks. We became very close that year, and I made sure, as did others, to know where Jason was sleeping on the street and make sure he was alive. He was one of our most vulnerable on our streets. He came to one day, in tears, pleading w/ me to build a village for him and his street family. He knew he'd die on the streets if they didn't have a village. I brought him w/ me to talk to Wheeler---we both knew Wheeler would lie to him, but there's something about being able to speak truth to power anyway. The story around that is long and I won't delve into it here other than to say that of course, Wheeler lied.  Jason died on Willamette Blvd just before Thanksgiving in 2018 while canning. The unhoused community that I am a part of as their advocate, made a commitment to follow through on a village in memory of Jason. While we had tried to "follow the rules" while Jason was alive, we didn't succeed. Soon after, Jason Barns Landing became a reality.


Not very updated FB page of JBL: https://www.facebook.com/JASONBARNSLANDING

JBL, as it's known to us, was a self-determined village put up w/ the help of others like myself who know that the city process kills houseless people while it slugs its way through bureaucracy. Folks on the street don't have time to wait. Waiting is a luxury only the wealthy can live through. The initial JBL village was put up on the north side of the Peninsula Trail at Columbia. We had 2 toilets bought and pre-paid by a business owner in St Johns, for a year! But Nick Fish had the toilet company remove them. So we got them again. Nick Fish had them removed. Again. Nick Fish sent out the goon squad of Park Rangers and Cops on a weekly basis to threaten our women (and men), assault our Black female resident with racial epithets, and threaten all of us w/ jail time. Weekly. We lasted for 9 months even throughout all of this. By winter we decided due to the daily harassment by the city, we should disband for a bit and come together again in the future.

That time has come. After sweep after sweep, our friends from JBL and others on the Cut, have had enough. They asked for another village, especially since they were lied to about the St Johns Village that's across the street from the SJCC. That village was never for us. We all knew that. For years, we've known that.

Enter the tarpees. We spoke to a man who's part of the Salish tribes in WA who designed tarpees for Standing Rock. After many zoom mtgs w/ him over the pandemic timeline, he gave us his blessing to use his design for BIPOC unhoused people and also anyone who is unhoused and not BIPOC. My friends on the streets in SJ are fed up w/ sweeps. Absolutely fed up. So we set up on an unused piece of land on the Cut next to the spot where they recently were swept into...from the North side, back to the South side. As it turns out, although the plot of land was Parks land when we set up, it's now the Housing Bureau's land, supposedly allocated to a new build for low-income housing. On day 1 of the tarpee build when we installed 2 tarpees, the HB came out to tell us we were trespassing. We informed them that no matter where houseless people are, they are trespassing, according to the city. So what? We also told them that if it's true that this low-income housing is going to go up  for folks who are BIPOC and were gentrified out of PDX, that we'd leave when the trucks came to begin the dig, but not before that. It could take years before the actual dig occurs.

Yesterday, we put up the 4th tarpee. The folks occupying the tarpees are like new people! Their sense of self-worth is back. They can stand inside the tall tarpee. They have built in beds and a built in table. They are beautiful. And we can move them when or if we have to. The fence company came yesterday to line out where the huge fence will be put up. The guy told us that a sweep will happen in the next 2 weeks sometime. We are not leaving. This is why we need support. The notion that sweeping people is a way to "handle" the "situation" is not tenable for unhoused people. In this case, it's the Housing Bureau unhousing unhoused people and as we told them on day 1, we aren't leaving until the trucks come to do the dig. This can buy us a lot of time which means more stability for folks in the village.

As of now, we have a doctor on board for our folks in JBL. He's a friend of mine and he is now the doctor on call for our people. We are connecting people to services they are in need of, as they ask for services they want.

The tarpee team and JBL need your support now to help us stay put until the dig happens. No one knows when that day will come.

Please reach out to me if you want to help. I'd love to take you around to meet folks at the camp.
My number is 503-453-9005. Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone. Old school. I'm 57.

With love and hope of support...

Mimi



On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 7:10 PM Sharron Fuchs <sharronfuchs@...> wrote:
Could you please explain the Tarpee Village? 

Sharron

On May 11, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:

Would anyone want to help us with our Tarpee Village in St Johns? 


On May 11, 2021, at 2:13 PM, Jim Krauel <jimmykrauel@...> wrote:


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:55 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
I love and have been following group behind this project Cob on Wood. Also  love how it connects to Portland where many people are intrigued by and have explored similar cob building methods. (traditional methods of mixed straw, mud, sand construction, often employing rounded and hand-molded forms, to create highly insulating, fire-safe, strong, inexpensive structures. 

The City of Portland has been exceptionally accommodating in allowing cob building in city code, fairly uniquely among US cities as far  as I understand. 

There are cob structures in various places around town, such as a seating/hut area at Portland State University near the corner of one building on the East edge of Park Blocks. 

I used to live just a few blocks away from the location of this "miracle village" in West Oakland -- which for those unfamiliar is a distinct area and city council district near NW corner of Oakland, to the west of downtown Oakland, that includes where the Bay Bridge and BART train tunnels connect San Francisco to the East Bay. (or, connect the West Bay to Oakland, as Oaklanders often prefer to say). As well as major port and military logistics operations, and container cranes (key local icon).

Overall it is a quite amazing environment -- Oaklandish! as a local civic group and culture/apparel brand's name says --  with heavy industry mixed with old residential, easy hop one stop on BART train to downtown San Francisco, and a kind of widespread laboratory of living and building approaches. It's tragic and wounded, in ways, such as West Oakland being entirely redlined and blight-designated for many decades, from which it is just now recovering; the huge scale of homelessness, and terrible conditions a lot of people are in; and the widespread displacement of poorer and minority populations occurring in last 10-15 years. 

At the same time, as this article highlights one case of, it's also long been a very creative, generative, even joyous and liberatory environment where all kinds of wide-ranging social and living, progressive  exploration occurs, and has for 150+ years. West Oakland had a well-established major Black community back to the late 19thC, became an important national center of Black society, culture, communication because it was the endpoint of the Transcontinental railroad, and home base for the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a key Black institution. Many of these porters were able to save money and buy homes in West Oakland, one of the relatively few urban areas in the country where that was possible, and this helped seed generations of Black community and enterprise there.. 

West Oakland was a key founding center and base for the Black Panther Party, and other extraordinary social organizing movements. Including more recently the Moms 4 Housing occupation & organizing for housing rights, which began with occupation of a vacant, investor-owned house on Magnolia Street under 2 blocks from where I lived.

Apologies for my effusion -- the area around the village featured in Guardian article means a lot of time, gives me a lot of ongoing inspiration and food for thought though I haven't been there in person for 2.5 years. I am currently putting together an essay / chapter about West Oakland shelter/housing explorations, for the Village Buildings project (see: villagebuildings.housing.wiki), and may visit and stay there in the next few weeks on a trip to California. 
Anyway, great article, thank you Angie for sharing. 
cheers, Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:27 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
Tucked under a highway overpass in West Oakland, just beyond a graveyard of charred cars and dumped debris, lies an unexpected refuge. There’s a collection of beautiful, small structures built from foraged materials. There’s a hot shower, a fully stocked kitchen and health clinic. There’s a free ...

View the article.
https://flip.it/PyyeTI

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/NLGevU

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
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Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Santa Cruz City Council restricts camping in most of city, once safe sleeping sites available

Tim McCormick
 

The Santa Cruz City Council on Tuesday approved a homeless ordinance that restricts camping in most parts of the city, also anywhere in daytime, but requires a safe sleeping program and daytime storage before the rules can take effect.
https://goodtimes.sc/santa-cruz-news/santa-cruz-city-council-approves-ordinance-homeless-camping/.

"The package of rules, called the “Camping Services and Standards Ordinance,” prohibits most camping in the city, a rule that will take effect when the city establishes at least 150 “safe sleeping sites.”  It is unclear where those will be located, but under the ordinance they will not be located next to schools. They also cannot be placed adjacent to residential neighborhoods, but it was not clear Tuesday how that will be determined."

I'd guess this ordinance generally predicts others that will be passed in many cities all over the West Coast and other high-homelessness areas. 

It's a contrast to Proposition B that just passed in Austin, which bans camping everywhere in city unless it's a designated parks-department campground, but doesn't require that there be any or sufficient such campgrounds. 
How that makes sense, i.e. where people would go, seems to be a generally unanswered question; as is, how this would pass the 8th Amendment constitutionality tests upheld by the 9th Circuit Court, should a court binding upon Austin / Texas (e.g., the US 5th Circuit Court) rule similarly.

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: Article: Homeless Oaklanders were tired of the housing crisis. So they built a ‘miracle’ village

Mimi German
 

Hi, Elise. Thank you for inquiring.

When we first set up, we were on Parks land. The Housing Bureau came out to tell us that this was their land. The goat people told us it was their land. The Housing Bureau told us they'd have us arrested for trespass if we stayed. We told them that folks are considered trespassing no matter what land houseless are living on. And we let them know that because there's nowhere to go, we aren't going anywhere. She explained the deal that the HB had struck w/ the city which was that they purchased the land from the City. We asked to see the contract because the land wasn't listed as HB land. Days later, the maps changed to HB land or some such thing. HB told us that they were going to put up the low-income or affordable housing units and that's when we told them that when that happens and the trucks are there and ready to dig, we'd move. Weeks later, the fence contractor came in to let us know, about the impending sweep and fence set-up.

So, yes. To your questions.
Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?
We are trying to contact as many groups as possible for eviction defense. I think it's important to get lists of folks ready to act/support as soon as a warning is posted and we don't when that will be. What I do know is that folks are not leaving the site because they are tired of being swept with nowhere to go.

Letters: It would be great to have details from the HB as to when those trucks are truly coming in so that if the folks at the site do want to leave, we can plan for that for a specified time. We'd also like letters to the HB telling them not to arrest us for trespass since there is no dig happening.

Calls/Petitions
Yes and yes. Calls to the HB and calls to the County and City Council to allow us to stay at least until the dig and then once the dig occurs, creating a safe sweepless space for us on the cut or in St Johns, for us to carry on with our tarpee village.

Protests.
Absolutely. We did tell the HB that if a fence was dropped, we'd have a recurrence of protest in support of our houseless friends, at the site. I reminded them of last years protests and our feelings about protecting houseless people from sweeps. We are putting together support for protests and need all the help we can get. Again, as soon as a trespass or eviction notice goes up, we begin.

Food/Donations/Etc.
We need $ for tarpee materials.  Also need carpet ends for folks for future tarpees and/or marmoleum for the floors.

We have a cashapp which is $JBLcommunity.

Folks are doing ok on food. We do need lots of water.

Mostly, need folks to come by to see where it is so they can come when we need them there for support. You can get to the site via N. Macrum (off of Lombard) then one block to Oberlin. Oberlin dead-ends at the Cut. Walk into the trail and folks will see the tarpee village to the left. It's on the S. side of the Peninsula Crossing Trail aka The Cut.

We also need people who can help us build tarpees. Folks w/ some experience w/ carpentry is best. We do the builds in the Alameda area. Our build team is small and everyone has lives, so the builds take a long time. If we have more people who can put some time in, we can build these very quickly. We basically have these on templates now.

Could also use some therapists for folks, not social workers.  It's been a request.

TO ALL INTERESTED in lending a hand in some way or another, thank you so very much.

Mimi
503-453-9005


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:06 AM Elise Aymer <elise@...> wrote:
Hi Mimi,

I understood from your post that the immediate peril for the village will be the city's "clean up" sweep that could come at any time. 

- Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?

- Does the village need financial support or donations of food or other goods? Is there anything like a GoFundMe to which we could contribute?

I am asking as not everyone on this list is local and not all of us are able to get out to the village for a tour or to be active on-site alongside the residents but may still want to help. 

Elise

On Wed, May 12, 2021 at 9:18 AM Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:
Before explaining the tarpee village in St Johns, I'd like to tell you about Jason Barns Landing which is the name of the tarpee village.

Jason Barns was a houseless person in St Johns. I met him about 5 years ago freezing in the icy rain at Safeway. I got him clothes from truck and helped him change out of his wet pants and shirt. He had plastic bags on his feet instead of socks because he had no socks. We became very close that year, and I made sure, as did others, to know where Jason was sleeping on the street and make sure he was alive. He was one of our most vulnerable on our streets. He came to one day, in tears, pleading w/ me to build a village for him and his street family. He knew he'd die on the streets if they didn't have a village. I brought him w/ me to talk to Wheeler---we both knew Wheeler would lie to him, but there's something about being able to speak truth to power anyway. The story around that is long and I won't delve into it here other than to say that of course, Wheeler lied.  Jason died on Willamette Blvd just before Thanksgiving in 2018 while canning. The unhoused community that I am a part of as their advocate, made a commitment to follow through on a village in memory of Jason. While we had tried to "follow the rules" while Jason was alive, we didn't succeed. Soon after, Jason Barns Landing became a reality.


Not very updated FB page of JBL: https://www.facebook.com/JASONBARNSLANDING

JBL, as it's known to us, was a self-determined village put up w/ the help of others like myself who know that the city process kills houseless people while it slugs its way through bureaucracy. Folks on the street don't have time to wait. Waiting is a luxury only the wealthy can live through. The initial JBL village was put up on the north side of the Peninsula Trail at Columbia. We had 2 toilets bought and pre-paid by a business owner in St Johns, for a year! But Nick Fish had the toilet company remove them. So we got them again. Nick Fish had them removed. Again. Nick Fish sent out the goon squad of Park Rangers and Cops on a weekly basis to threaten our women (and men), assault our Black female resident with racial epithets, and threaten all of us w/ jail time. Weekly. We lasted for 9 months even throughout all of this. By winter we decided due to the daily harassment by the city, we should disband for a bit and come together again in the future.

That time has come. After sweep after sweep, our friends from JBL and others on the Cut, have had enough. They asked for another village, especially since they were lied to about the St Johns Village that's across the street from the SJCC. That village was never for us. We all knew that. For years, we've known that.

Enter the tarpees. We spoke to a man who's part of the Salish tribes in WA who designed tarpees for Standing Rock. After many zoom mtgs w/ him over the pandemic timeline, he gave us his blessing to use his design for BIPOC unhoused people and also anyone who is unhoused and not BIPOC. My friends on the streets in SJ are fed up w/ sweeps. Absolutely fed up. So we set up on an unused piece of land on the Cut next to the spot where they recently were swept into...from the North side, back to the South side. As it turns out, although the plot of land was Parks land when we set up, it's now the Housing Bureau's land, supposedly allocated to a new build for low-income housing. On day 1 of the tarpee build when we installed 2 tarpees, the HB came out to tell us we were trespassing. We informed them that no matter where houseless people are, they are trespassing, according to the city. So what? We also told them that if it's true that this low-income housing is going to go up  for folks who are BIPOC and were gentrified out of PDX, that we'd leave when the trucks came to begin the dig, but not before that. It could take years before the actual dig occurs.

Yesterday, we put up the 4th tarpee. The folks occupying the tarpees are like new people! Their sense of self-worth is back. They can stand inside the tall tarpee. They have built in beds and a built in table. They are beautiful. And we can move them when or if we have to. The fence company came yesterday to line out where the huge fence will be put up. The guy told us that a sweep will happen in the next 2 weeks sometime. We are not leaving. This is why we need support. The notion that sweeping people is a way to "handle" the "situation" is not tenable for unhoused people. In this case, it's the Housing Bureau unhousing unhoused people and as we told them on day 1, we aren't leaving until the trucks come to do the dig. This can buy us a lot of time which means more stability for folks in the village.

As of now, we have a doctor on board for our folks in JBL. He's a friend of mine and he is now the doctor on call for our people. We are connecting people to services they are in need of, as they ask for services they want.

The tarpee team and JBL need your support now to help us stay put until the dig happens. No one knows when that day will come.

Please reach out to me if you want to help. I'd love to take you around to meet folks at the camp.
My number is 503-453-9005. Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone. Old school. I'm 57.

With love and hope of support...

Mimi



On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 7:10 PM Sharron Fuchs <sharronfuchs@...> wrote:
Could you please explain the Tarpee Village? 

Sharron

On May 11, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:

Would anyone want to help us with our Tarpee Village in St Johns? 


On May 11, 2021, at 2:13 PM, Jim Krauel <jimmykrauel@...> wrote:


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:55 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
I love and have been following group behind this project Cob on Wood. Also  love how it connects to Portland where many people are intrigued by and have explored similar cob building methods. (traditional methods of mixed straw, mud, sand construction, often employing rounded and hand-molded forms, to create highly insulating, fire-safe, strong, inexpensive structures. 

The City of Portland has been exceptionally accommodating in allowing cob building in city code, fairly uniquely among US cities as far  as I understand. 

There are cob structures in various places around town, such as a seating/hut area at Portland State University near the corner of one building on the East edge of Park Blocks. 

I used to live just a few blocks away from the location of this "miracle village" in West Oakland -- which for those unfamiliar is a distinct area and city council district near NW corner of Oakland, to the west of downtown Oakland, that includes where the Bay Bridge and BART train tunnels connect San Francisco to the East Bay. (or, connect the West Bay to Oakland, as Oaklanders often prefer to say). As well as major port and military logistics operations, and container cranes (key local icon).

Overall it is a quite amazing environment -- Oaklandish! as a local civic group and culture/apparel brand's name says --  with heavy industry mixed with old residential, easy hop one stop on BART train to downtown San Francisco, and a kind of widespread laboratory of living and building approaches. It's tragic and wounded, in ways, such as West Oakland being entirely redlined and blight-designated for many decades, from which it is just now recovering; the huge scale of homelessness, and terrible conditions a lot of people are in; and the widespread displacement of poorer and minority populations occurring in last 10-15 years. 

At the same time, as this article highlights one case of, it's also long been a very creative, generative, even joyous and liberatory environment where all kinds of wide-ranging social and living, progressive  exploration occurs, and has for 150+ years. West Oakland had a well-established major Black community back to the late 19thC, became an important national center of Black society, culture, communication because it was the endpoint of the Transcontinental railroad, and home base for the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a key Black institution. Many of these porters were able to save money and buy homes in West Oakland, one of the relatively few urban areas in the country where that was possible, and this helped seed generations of Black community and enterprise there.. 

West Oakland was a key founding center and base for the Black Panther Party, and other extraordinary social organizing movements. Including more recently the Moms 4 Housing occupation & organizing for housing rights, which began with occupation of a vacant, investor-owned house on Magnolia Street under 2 blocks from where I lived.

Apologies for my effusion -- the area around the village featured in Guardian article means a lot of time, gives me a lot of ongoing inspiration and food for thought though I haven't been there in person for 2.5 years. I am currently putting together an essay / chapter about West Oakland shelter/housing explorations, for the Village Buildings project (see: villagebuildings.housing.wiki), and may visit and stay there in the next few weeks on a trip to California. 
Anyway, great article, thank you Angie for sharing. 
cheers, Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:27 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
Tucked under a highway overpass in West Oakland, just beyond a graveyard of charred cars and dumped debris, lies an unexpected refuge. There’s a collection of beautiful, small structures built from foraged materials. There’s a hot shower, a fully stocked kitchen and health clinic. There’s a free ...

View the article.
https://flip.it/PyyeTI

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/NLGevU

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: today 10-11am webinar: #BuiltForZero [homelessness] & Public Interest Technology #builtforzero

Jayme Delson
 

Hi Elise,

Thank you for your reply.  thank you for sending out their approach. 

Being a big foundation they might not know the history of homeless programs?  What i consider adjusting at the edges, they might think is making a big difference?

Cheers,

Jayme


On 5/13/2021 10:58 AM, Elise Aymer wrote:
Hi Jayme,

It looks like Build for Zero relies on the creation of a list of homeless people as the basis for their engagements. It's supposed to be updated along the way. But yes, 590 sounds low, especially as we know there are so many hidden people who are doubled up with relatives, sleeping on couches at acquaintance's, sleeping at work, living in their vehicles, etc.

Elise


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 1:48 PM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Elise, 

Great questions.  I am new to built for 0, however from reading their summaries, it looks like your concerns are founded, l look forward to being in error if they are not just a rerun !

Wow are there really only 570 homeless in Bakersfield? There are 3 times that amount even by point in time counts, which are really not a meaningful way to determine who needs a home, in Humboldt county ca.

Cheers, Jayme

jayme@...

On 5/13/2021 9:09 AM, Elise Aymer wrote:
Can you clarify the following, Tim?

1) Is Built for Zero, which was previously deployed in Bakersfield, CA with MacArthur Foundation funding being promoted for Portland?

2) Is it the case that Built for Zero has only helped 70 people in Bakerfield out of homelessness, yet in the meantime the number of unhoused has ballooned to 570?

3) What are the flaws/problems with Built for Zero that make it an ineffective and/or slow program?

4) How does Built for Zero tie into the Meiran quote and the meeting you attended?

5) Is Built for Zero top-down and not designed with equity, inclusion and the lived experiences of the houseless in mind?

6) What is the greater significance of the event today? What might we do in attending? Is it an opportunity to question the model? Is this event an important precursor to bringing Built for Zero to Portland?

I am asking these questions for myself and for others on the listserv because I think what you've posted is likely important and so want to fully understand.

Thanks,
Elise

On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:18 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Andy, I agree.
I think you are getting that from this Willamette Week article by Sophie Peel on Tuesday, which for those who haven't seen is available at: 
[Bcc: Sophie Peel - Sophie thanks again for this, please feel free to join this list and join conversation here if you would like].

I was in attendance at that (virtual) meeting, it was pretty shocking -- for Portland, I'd note -- and affecting.

I sent this note in the meeting chat channel to the panelists, ie all AHFE Coordinating Board members present, just after Commissioner Meieran spoke: 

-----
"Formerly and not so far from houseless, Portland-born committed advocate here. I want to thank Commissioner Meieran, and say that she has *greatly* stood out among local officials and leaders in being willing to listen and participate with our houseless-centered advocacy group. We have felt treated with open contempt or general indifference by others here. 

"Went to a committee; they offered me a chair...

But where shall we go to-day, my dear?"

- W.H. Auden, "Refugee Blues" 1939

https://allpoetry.com/Refugee-Blues.

------- 


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 7:18 AM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

Commissioner Sharon Meieran is my hero.  If you agree with what she is saying below, please post a comment here. 

Below is a quote from the May 5th AHFE meeting:


“Sorry, my motto is speak your mind even if your voice shakes, and I know my voice is shaking right now. The way that we even have this conversation is to me so disrespectful. We talk about having difficult conversations, we talk about inclusion and equity and respecting people, and what I find is, we actually don’t have those difficult conversations because certain voices and perspectives are silenced or mocked or disregarded for whatever reason. It does not actually feel like a safe space in many ways, and in recognizing that I’m privileged, I’m an elected official, that I’m white, all of these things—and for me it doesn’t feel safe. I can imagine it might not feel safe for other people.”


Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 13, 2021, at 5:40 AM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


recent story on Built For Zero, in Next City:
"Bakersfield is the first city in California to achieve functional zero for any category, and Maguire says that’s an important milestone in a state with an infamously tough housing crisis.

“[Bakersfield] is not L.A., but it’s a decent-sized city combined with a huge rural county,” Maguire says. “It’s a large, complex geography in one of the highest-cost states in America, with conservative politicians and lots of things that would make people say, ‘That’s not the place to go solve homelessness.’ But actually, Bakersfield did it.”

One reason why Bakersfield has had success in reducing its chronically homeless population is because the Housing Authority of the County of Kern has committed time and resources to helping. Heather Kimmel was leading Built for Zero work at the California Veterans Assistance Foundation before joining the housing authority, where she now works as assistant executive director. The Housing Authority of the County of Kern has been uniquely committed to serving people experiencing homelessness for years, Kimmel says, but more housing authorities are starting to focus explicitly on the issue.

“The link between the housing authority’s resources and ending homelessness is becoming more and more clear,” Kimmel says. “A community can’t effectively address homelessness without a strong partnership with the housing authority.”

Sounds good, right? Solutions Journalism! 

with apologies, I find I once again have a contrarian take... see below cartoon
<IMG_3276.jpg>
<IMG_3277.jpg>

@tmccormick: 
how the story went..How the situation's going..
Chronic homeless reduced by 70 people; 
total, by PIT count, increased by 570 people, 27%, in a year.
Perhaps better story is, why we're hearing #BuiltForZero story, vs of the less attention-deserving poor?
 c/@anikasinghlemar @JakeMaguire


as I tweeted to story author, editor, Next City co-founder acquaintance, and #BuiltForZero program head Jake Maguire. 

Not so incidentally, I recently watched Maguire present to Portland area's  homelessnes policy board, A Home For Everyone.  AHFE's Executive Committee has basically preemptorily adopted BuiltForZero's program and policy guidance, with no public discussion, in a manner and direction I find rather problematic for multiple reasons.



On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 5:27 AM Tim McCormick via groups.io <tmccormick=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

POWER TO THE PUBLIC: TACKLING HOMELESSNESS

Join us for an event featuring the book's authors and Built for Zero leaders.
May 13, 2021

<IMG_3274.jpg>

Online event today 10am PDT, 1pm EDT, featuring #BuiltForZero program from Community Solutions, and the well-known founder of CS, Roseanne Haggerty. 

You MUST register here: 
** If any issues, contact hosts Community Solutions - I am not running this, won't be able to help. **

Built For Zero is a very significant program/org that recently got huge funding boost from the MacArthur Foundation.  

They have a particular approach to defining and achieving "functional zero" homelessness for target populations -- typically, either chronic or veteran homelessness. 

This particular webinar appears to be looking especially at an  "Public Interest Technology," and features authors of recent book on this. #BuiltForZero is a key example discussed in the book.  

From what I know and can see, I really recommend this webinar. If you haven't yet heard about BuiltForZero in your community, chances are you will before long, and your officials / agency heads have already. Including recently in Portland, -- where basically their program was adopted straight out by A Home For Everyone, Executive Committee, without public discussion or consultation with the Coordinating Board. 

Could be fine, great, in outcome -- I don't know, I'm just skeptical as usual, especially when they didn't ask us our views on it. 
The Executive Committee peremptorily chose Community Solutions - seems like the typical amusing ironic way of the world, from my p.o.v., but who asked my opinion on that anyway, ever? ;)

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: Article: Homeless Oaklanders were tired of the housing crisis. So they built a ‘miracle’ village

Elise Aymer
 

Hi Mimi,

I understood from your post that the immediate peril for the village will be the city's "clean up" sweep that could come at any time. 

- Are there any activist efforts to fight the eviction that we can help with? Letters? Calls? Petitions? Protests/other actions? Upcoming hearings about the site?

- Does the village need financial support or donations of food or other goods? Is there anything like a GoFundMe to which we could contribute?

I am asking as not everyone on this list is local and not all of us are able to get out to the village for a tour or to be active on-site alongside the residents but may still want to help. 

Elise

On Wed, May 12, 2021 at 9:18 AM Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:
Before explaining the tarpee village in St Johns, I'd like to tell you about Jason Barns Landing which is the name of the tarpee village.

Jason Barns was a houseless person in St Johns. I met him about 5 years ago freezing in the icy rain at Safeway. I got him clothes from truck and helped him change out of his wet pants and shirt. He had plastic bags on his feet instead of socks because he had no socks. We became very close that year, and I made sure, as did others, to know where Jason was sleeping on the street and make sure he was alive. He was one of our most vulnerable on our streets. He came to one day, in tears, pleading w/ me to build a village for him and his street family. He knew he'd die on the streets if they didn't have a village. I brought him w/ me to talk to Wheeler---we both knew Wheeler would lie to him, but there's something about being able to speak truth to power anyway. The story around that is long and I won't delve into it here other than to say that of course, Wheeler lied.  Jason died on Willamette Blvd just before Thanksgiving in 2018 while canning. The unhoused community that I am a part of as their advocate, made a commitment to follow through on a village in memory of Jason. While we had tried to "follow the rules" while Jason was alive, we didn't succeed. Soon after, Jason Barns Landing became a reality.


Not very updated FB page of JBL: https://www.facebook.com/JASONBARNSLANDING

JBL, as it's known to us, was a self-determined village put up w/ the help of others like myself who know that the city process kills houseless people while it slugs its way through bureaucracy. Folks on the street don't have time to wait. Waiting is a luxury only the wealthy can live through. The initial JBL village was put up on the north side of the Peninsula Trail at Columbia. We had 2 toilets bought and pre-paid by a business owner in St Johns, for a year! But Nick Fish had the toilet company remove them. So we got them again. Nick Fish had them removed. Again. Nick Fish sent out the goon squad of Park Rangers and Cops on a weekly basis to threaten our women (and men), assault our Black female resident with racial epithets, and threaten all of us w/ jail time. Weekly. We lasted for 9 months even throughout all of this. By winter we decided due to the daily harassment by the city, we should disband for a bit and come together again in the future.

That time has come. After sweep after sweep, our friends from JBL and others on the Cut, have had enough. They asked for another village, especially since they were lied to about the St Johns Village that's across the street from the SJCC. That village was never for us. We all knew that. For years, we've known that.

Enter the tarpees. We spoke to a man who's part of the Salish tribes in WA who designed tarpees for Standing Rock. After many zoom mtgs w/ him over the pandemic timeline, he gave us his blessing to use his design for BIPOC unhoused people and also anyone who is unhoused and not BIPOC. My friends on the streets in SJ are fed up w/ sweeps. Absolutely fed up. So we set up on an unused piece of land on the Cut next to the spot where they recently were swept into...from the North side, back to the South side. As it turns out, although the plot of land was Parks land when we set up, it's now the Housing Bureau's land, supposedly allocated to a new build for low-income housing. On day 1 of the tarpee build when we installed 2 tarpees, the HB came out to tell us we were trespassing. We informed them that no matter where houseless people are, they are trespassing, according to the city. So what? We also told them that if it's true that this low-income housing is going to go up  for folks who are BIPOC and were gentrified out of PDX, that we'd leave when the trucks came to begin the dig, but not before that. It could take years before the actual dig occurs.

Yesterday, we put up the 4th tarpee. The folks occupying the tarpees are like new people! Their sense of self-worth is back. They can stand inside the tall tarpee. They have built in beds and a built in table. They are beautiful. And we can move them when or if we have to. The fence company came yesterday to line out where the huge fence will be put up. The guy told us that a sweep will happen in the next 2 weeks sometime. We are not leaving. This is why we need support. The notion that sweeping people is a way to "handle" the "situation" is not tenable for unhoused people. In this case, it's the Housing Bureau unhousing unhoused people and as we told them on day 1, we aren't leaving until the trucks come to do the dig. This can buy us a lot of time which means more stability for folks in the village.

As of now, we have a doctor on board for our folks in JBL. He's a friend of mine and he is now the doctor on call for our people. We are connecting people to services they are in need of, as they ask for services they want.

The tarpee team and JBL need your support now to help us stay put until the dig happens. No one knows when that day will come.

Please reach out to me if you want to help. I'd love to take you around to meet folks at the camp.
My number is 503-453-9005. Call or text. Or email. Just a heads up...I dislike communicating by text at length. I prefer to speak on the phone. Old school. I'm 57.

With love and hope of support...

Mimi



On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 7:10 PM Sharron Fuchs <sharronfuchs@...> wrote:
Could you please explain the Tarpee Village? 

Sharron

On May 11, 2021, at 7:03 PM, Mimi German <mirgerman0000@...> wrote:

Would anyone want to help us with our Tarpee Village in St Johns? 


On May 11, 2021, at 2:13 PM, Jim Krauel <jimmykrauel@...> wrote:


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:55 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
I love and have been following group behind this project Cob on Wood. Also  love how it connects to Portland where many people are intrigued by and have explored similar cob building methods. (traditional methods of mixed straw, mud, sand construction, often employing rounded and hand-molded forms, to create highly insulating, fire-safe, strong, inexpensive structures. 

The City of Portland has been exceptionally accommodating in allowing cob building in city code, fairly uniquely among US cities as far  as I understand. 

There are cob structures in various places around town, such as a seating/hut area at Portland State University near the corner of one building on the East edge of Park Blocks. 

I used to live just a few blocks away from the location of this "miracle village" in West Oakland -- which for those unfamiliar is a distinct area and city council district near NW corner of Oakland, to the west of downtown Oakland, that includes where the Bay Bridge and BART train tunnels connect San Francisco to the East Bay. (or, connect the West Bay to Oakland, as Oaklanders often prefer to say). As well as major port and military logistics operations, and container cranes (key local icon).

Overall it is a quite amazing environment -- Oaklandish! as a local civic group and culture/apparel brand's name says --  with heavy industry mixed with old residential, easy hop one stop on BART train to downtown San Francisco, and a kind of widespread laboratory of living and building approaches. It's tragic and wounded, in ways, such as West Oakland being entirely redlined and blight-designated for many decades, from which it is just now recovering; the huge scale of homelessness, and terrible conditions a lot of people are in; and the widespread displacement of poorer and minority populations occurring in last 10-15 years. 

At the same time, as this article highlights one case of, it's also long been a very creative, generative, even joyous and liberatory environment where all kinds of wide-ranging social and living, progressive  exploration occurs, and has for 150+ years. West Oakland had a well-established major Black community back to the late 19thC, became an important national center of Black society, culture, communication because it was the endpoint of the Transcontinental railroad, and home base for the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a key Black institution. Many of these porters were able to save money and buy homes in West Oakland, one of the relatively few urban areas in the country where that was possible, and this helped seed generations of Black community and enterprise there.. 

West Oakland was a key founding center and base for the Black Panther Party, and other extraordinary social organizing movements. Including more recently the Moms 4 Housing occupation & organizing for housing rights, which began with occupation of a vacant, investor-owned house on Magnolia Street under 2 blocks from where I lived.

Apologies for my effusion -- the area around the village featured in Guardian article means a lot of time, gives me a lot of ongoing inspiration and food for thought though I haven't been there in person for 2.5 years. I am currently putting together an essay / chapter about West Oakland shelter/housing explorations, for the Village Buildings project (see: villagebuildings.housing.wiki), and may visit and stay there in the next few weeks on a trip to California. 
Anyway, great article, thank you Angie for sharing. 
cheers, Tim 

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 5:27 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
Tucked under a highway overpass in West Oakland, just beyond a graveyard of charred cars and dumped debris, lies an unexpected refuge. There’s a collection of beautiful, small structures built from foraged materials. There’s a hot shower, a fully stocked kitchen and health clinic. There’s a free ...

View the article.
https://flip.it/PyyeTI

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/NLGevU

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: today 10-11am webinar: #BuiltForZero [homelessness] & Public Interest Technology #builtforzero

Elise Aymer
 

Hi Jayme,

It looks like Build for Zero relies on the creation of a list of homeless people as the basis for their engagements. It's supposed to be updated along the way. But yes, 590 sounds low, especially as we know there are so many hidden people who are doubled up with relatives, sleeping on couches at acquaintance's, sleeping at work, living in their vehicles, etc.

Elise


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 1:48 PM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:

Hi Elise, 

Great questions.  I am new to built for 0, however from reading their summaries, it looks like your concerns are founded, l look forward to being in error if they are not just a rerun !

Wow are there really only 570 homeless in Bakersfield? There are 3 times that amount even by point in time counts, which are really not a meaningful way to determine who needs a home, in Humboldt county ca.

Cheers, Jayme

jayme@...

On 5/13/2021 9:09 AM, Elise Aymer wrote:
Can you clarify the following, Tim?

1) Is Built for Zero, which was previously deployed in Bakersfield, CA with MacArthur Foundation funding being promoted for Portland?

2) Is it the case that Built for Zero has only helped 70 people in Bakerfield out of homelessness, yet in the meantime the number of unhoused has ballooned to 570?

3) What are the flaws/problems with Built for Zero that make it an ineffective and/or slow program?

4) How does Built for Zero tie into the Meiran quote and the meeting you attended?

5) Is Built for Zero top-down and not designed with equity, inclusion and the lived experiences of the houseless in mind?

6) What is the greater significance of the event today? What might we do in attending? Is it an opportunity to question the model? Is this event an important precursor to bringing Built for Zero to Portland?

I am asking these questions for myself and for others on the listserv because I think what you've posted is likely important and so want to fully understand.

Thanks,
Elise

On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:18 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Andy, I agree.
I think you are getting that from this Willamette Week article by Sophie Peel on Tuesday, which for those who haven't seen is available at: 
[Bcc: Sophie Peel - Sophie thanks again for this, please feel free to join this list and join conversation here if you would like].

I was in attendance at that (virtual) meeting, it was pretty shocking -- for Portland, I'd note -- and affecting.

I sent this note in the meeting chat channel to the panelists, ie all AHFE Coordinating Board members present, just after Commissioner Meieran spoke: 

-----
"Formerly and not so far from houseless, Portland-born committed advocate here. I want to thank Commissioner Meieran, and say that she has *greatly* stood out among local officials and leaders in being willing to listen and participate with our houseless-centered advocacy group. We have felt treated with open contempt or general indifference by others here. 

"Went to a committee; they offered me a chair...

But where shall we go to-day, my dear?"

- W.H. Auden, "Refugee Blues" 1939

https://allpoetry.com/Refugee-Blues.

------- 


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 7:18 AM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

Commissioner Sharon Meieran is my hero.  If you agree with what she is saying below, please post a comment here. 

Below is a quote from the May 5th AHFE meeting:


“Sorry, my motto is speak your mind even if your voice shakes, and I know my voice is shaking right now. The way that we even have this conversation is to me so disrespectful. We talk about having difficult conversations, we talk about inclusion and equity and respecting people, and what I find is, we actually don’t have those difficult conversations because certain voices and perspectives are silenced or mocked or disregarded for whatever reason. It does not actually feel like a safe space in many ways, and in recognizing that I’m privileged, I’m an elected official, that I’m white, all of these things—and for me it doesn’t feel safe. I can imagine it might not feel safe for other people.”


Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 13, 2021, at 5:40 AM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


recent story on Built For Zero, in Next City:
"Bakersfield is the first city in California to achieve functional zero for any category, and Maguire says that’s an important milestone in a state with an infamously tough housing crisis.

“[Bakersfield] is not L.A., but it’s a decent-sized city combined with a huge rural county,” Maguire says. “It’s a large, complex geography in one of the highest-cost states in America, with conservative politicians and lots of things that would make people say, ‘That’s not the place to go solve homelessness.’ But actually, Bakersfield did it.”

One reason why Bakersfield has had success in reducing its chronically homeless population is because the Housing Authority of the County of Kern has committed time and resources to helping. Heather Kimmel was leading Built for Zero work at the California Veterans Assistance Foundation before joining the housing authority, where she now works as assistant executive director. The Housing Authority of the County of Kern has been uniquely committed to serving people experiencing homelessness for years, Kimmel says, but more housing authorities are starting to focus explicitly on the issue.

“The link between the housing authority’s resources and ending homelessness is becoming more and more clear,” Kimmel says. “A community can’t effectively address homelessness without a strong partnership with the housing authority.”

Sounds good, right? Solutions Journalism! 

with apologies, I find I once again have a contrarian take... see below cartoon
<IMG_3276.jpg>
<IMG_3277.jpg>

@tmccormick: 
how the story went..How the situation's going..
Chronic homeless reduced by 70 people; 
total, by PIT count, increased by 570 people, 27%, in a year.
Perhaps better story is, why we're hearing #BuiltForZero story, vs of the less attention-deserving poor?
 c/@anikasinghlemar @JakeMaguire


as I tweeted to story author, editor, Next City co-founder acquaintance, and #BuiltForZero program head Jake Maguire. 

Not so incidentally, I recently watched Maguire present to Portland area's  homelessnes policy board, A Home For Everyone.  AHFE's Executive Committee has basically preemptorily adopted BuiltForZero's program and policy guidance, with no public discussion, in a manner and direction I find rather problematic for multiple reasons.



On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 5:27 AM Tim McCormick via groups.io <tmccormick=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

POWER TO THE PUBLIC: TACKLING HOMELESSNESS

Join us for an event featuring the book's authors and Built for Zero leaders.
May 13, 2021

<IMG_3274.jpg>

Online event today 10am PDT, 1pm EDT, featuring #BuiltForZero program from Community Solutions, and the well-known founder of CS, Roseanne Haggerty. 

You MUST register here: 
** If any issues, contact hosts Community Solutions - I am not running this, won't be able to help. **

Built For Zero is a very significant program/org that recently got huge funding boost from the MacArthur Foundation.  

They have a particular approach to defining and achieving "functional zero" homelessness for target populations -- typically, either chronic or veteran homelessness. 

This particular webinar appears to be looking especially at an  "Public Interest Technology," and features authors of recent book on this. #BuiltForZero is a key example discussed in the book.  

From what I know and can see, I really recommend this webinar. If you haven't yet heard about BuiltForZero in your community, chances are you will before long, and your officials / agency heads have already. Including recently in Portland, -- where basically their program was adopted straight out by A Home For Everyone, Executive Committee, without public discussion or consultation with the Coordinating Board. 

Could be fine, great, in outcome -- I don't know, I'm just skeptical as usual, especially when they didn't ask us our views on it. 
The Executive Committee peremptorily chose Community Solutions - seems like the typical amusing ironic way of the world, from my p.o.v., but who asked my opinion on that anyway, ever? ;)

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: today 10-11am webinar: #BuiltForZero [homelessness] & Public Interest Technology #builtforzero

Elise Aymer
 

Here is the Built for Zero site: https://community.solutions/our-solutions/built-for-zero/

More specifically here is their approach: https://community.solutions/our-solutions/our-approach/

It looks more like an initiative of the MacArthur Foundation than something that they grant funded and it's a national program that involves numerous municipalities across the country.

The site makes what I think are sweeping claims of having "ended homelessness" in five communities and "ended veteran homeless" in twelve. These determinations are based on a standard that they call "functional zero" https://community.solutions/functional-zero/

This is what I could find from the source itself. I would like to hear from others on this list who are better places to comment and critique the program.

Elise


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:18 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Andy, I agree.
I think you are getting that from this Willamette Week article by Sophie Peel on Tuesday, which for those who haven't seen is available at: 
[Bcc: Sophie Peel - Sophie thanks again for this, please feel free to join this list and join conversation here if you would like].

I was in attendance at that (virtual) meeting, it was pretty shocking -- for Portland, I'd note -- and affecting.

I sent this note in the meeting chat channel to the panelists, ie all AHFE Coordinating Board members present, just after Commissioner Meieran spoke: 

-----
"Formerly and not so far from houseless, Portland-born committed advocate here. I want to thank Commissioner Meieran, and say that she has *greatly* stood out among local officials and leaders in being willing to listen and participate with our houseless-centered advocacy group. We have felt treated with open contempt or general indifference by others here. 

"Went to a committee; they offered me a chair...

But where shall we go to-day, my dear?"

- W.H. Auden, "Refugee Blues" 1939

https://allpoetry.com/Refugee-Blues.

------- 


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 7:18 AM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

Commissioner Sharon Meieran is my hero.  If you agree with what she is saying below, please post a comment here. 

Below is a quote from the May 5th AHFE meeting:


“Sorry, my motto is speak your mind even if your voice shakes, and I know my voice is shaking right now. The way that we even have this conversation is to me so disrespectful. We talk about having difficult conversations, we talk about inclusion and equity and respecting people, and what I find is, we actually don’t have those difficult conversations because certain voices and perspectives are silenced or mocked or disregarded for whatever reason. It does not actually feel like a safe space in many ways, and in recognizing that I’m privileged, I’m an elected official, that I’m white, all of these things—and for me it doesn’t feel safe. I can imagine it might not feel safe for other people.”


Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 13, 2021, at 5:40 AM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


recent story on Built For Zero, in Next City:
"Bakersfield is the first city in California to achieve functional zero for any category, and Maguire says that’s an important milestone in a state with an infamously tough housing crisis.

“[Bakersfield] is not L.A., but it’s a decent-sized city combined with a huge rural county,” Maguire says. “It’s a large, complex geography in one of the highest-cost states in America, with conservative politicians and lots of things that would make people say, ‘That’s not the place to go solve homelessness.’ But actually, Bakersfield did it.”

One reason why Bakersfield has had success in reducing its chronically homeless population is because the Housing Authority of the County of Kern has committed time and resources to helping. Heather Kimmel was leading Built for Zero work at the California Veterans Assistance Foundation before joining the housing authority, where she now works as assistant executive director. The Housing Authority of the County of Kern has been uniquely committed to serving people experiencing homelessness for years, Kimmel says, but more housing authorities are starting to focus explicitly on the issue.

“The link between the housing authority’s resources and ending homelessness is becoming more and more clear,” Kimmel says. “A community can’t effectively address homelessness without a strong partnership with the housing authority.”

Sounds good, right? Solutions Journalism! 

with apologies, I find I once again have a contrarian take... see below cartoon
<IMG_3276.jpg>
<IMG_3277.jpg>

@tmccormick: 
how the story went..How the situation's going..
Chronic homeless reduced by 70 people; 
total, by PIT count, increased by 570 people, 27%, in a year.
Perhaps better story is, why we're hearing #BuiltForZero story, vs of the less attention-deserving poor?
 c/@anikasinghlemar @JakeMaguire


as I tweeted to story author, editor, Next City co-founder acquaintance, and #BuiltForZero program head Jake Maguire. 

Not so incidentally, I recently watched Maguire present to Portland area's  homelessnes policy board, A Home For Everyone.  AHFE's Executive Committee has basically preemptorily adopted BuiltForZero's program and policy guidance, with no public discussion, in a manner and direction I find rather problematic for multiple reasons.



On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 5:27 AM Tim McCormick via groups.io <tmccormick=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

POWER TO THE PUBLIC: TACKLING HOMELESSNESS

Join us for an event featuring the book's authors and Built for Zero leaders.
May 13, 2021

<IMG_3274.jpg>

Online event today 10am PDT, 1pm EDT, featuring #BuiltForZero program from Community Solutions, and the well-known founder of CS, Roseanne Haggerty. 

You MUST register here: 
** If any issues, contact hosts Community Solutions - I am not running this, won't be able to help. **

Built For Zero is a very significant program/org that recently got huge funding boost from the MacArthur Foundation.  

They have a particular approach to defining and achieving "functional zero" homelessness for target populations -- typically, either chronic or veteran homelessness. 

This particular webinar appears to be looking especially at an  "Public Interest Technology," and features authors of recent book on this. #BuiltForZero is a key example discussed in the book.  

From what I know and can see, I really recommend this webinar. If you haven't yet heard about BuiltForZero in your community, chances are you will before long, and your officials / agency heads have already. Including recently in Portland, -- where basically their program was adopted straight out by A Home For Everyone, Executive Committee, without public discussion or consultation with the Coordinating Board. 

Could be fine, great, in outcome -- I don't know, I'm just skeptical as usual, especially when they didn't ask us our views on it. 
The Executive Committee peremptorily chose Community Solutions - seems like the typical amusing ironic way of the world, from my p.o.v., but who asked my opinion on that anyway, ever? ;)

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 



--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!


Re: today 10-11am webinar: #BuiltForZero [homelessness] & Public Interest Technology #builtforzero

Jayme Delson
 

Hi Elise, 

Great questions.  I am new to built for 0, however from reading their summaries, it looks like your concerns are founded, l look forward to being in error if they are not just a rerun !

Wow are there really only 570 homeless in Bakersfield? There are 3 times that amount even by point in time counts, which are really not a meaningful way to determine who needs a home, in Humboldt county ca.

Cheers, Jayme

jayme@...

On 5/13/2021 9:09 AM, Elise Aymer wrote:
Can you clarify the following, Tim?

1) Is Built for Zero, which was previously deployed in Bakersfield, CA with MacArthur Foundation funding being promoted for Portland?

2) Is it the case that Built for Zero has only helped 70 people in Bakerfield out of homelessness, yet in the meantime the number of unhoused has ballooned to 570?

3) What are the flaws/problems with Built for Zero that make it an ineffective and/or slow program?

4) How does Built for Zero tie into the Meiran quote and the meeting you attended?

5) Is Built for Zero top-down and not designed with equity, inclusion and the lived experiences of the houseless in mind?

6) What is the greater significance of the event today? What might we do in attending? Is it an opportunity to question the model? Is this event an important precursor to bringing Built for Zero to Portland?

I am asking these questions for myself and for others on the listserv because I think what you've posted is likely important and so want to fully understand.

Thanks,
Elise

On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:18 AM Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:
thanks Andy, I agree.
I think you are getting that from this Willamette Week article by Sophie Peel on Tuesday, which for those who haven't seen is available at: 
[Bcc: Sophie Peel - Sophie thanks again for this, please feel free to join this list and join conversation here if you would like].

I was in attendance at that (virtual) meeting, it was pretty shocking -- for Portland, I'd note -- and affecting.

I sent this note in the meeting chat channel to the panelists, ie all AHFE Coordinating Board members present, just after Commissioner Meieran spoke: 

-----
"Formerly and not so far from houseless, Portland-born committed advocate here. I want to thank Commissioner Meieran, and say that she has *greatly* stood out among local officials and leaders in being willing to listen and participate with our houseless-centered advocacy group. We have felt treated with open contempt or general indifference by others here. 

"Went to a committee; they offered me a chair...

But where shall we go to-day, my dear?"

- W.H. Auden, "Refugee Blues" 1939

https://allpoetry.com/Refugee-Blues.

------- 


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 7:18 AM Andrew Olshin <Andrew.Olshin@...> wrote:

Commissioner Sharon Meieran is my hero.  If you agree with what she is saying below, please post a comment here. 

Below is a quote from the May 5th AHFE meeting:


“Sorry, my motto is speak your mind even if your voice shakes, and I know my voice is shaking right now. The way that we even have this conversation is to me so disrespectful. We talk about having difficult conversations, we talk about inclusion and equity and respecting people, and what I find is, we actually don’t have those difficult conversations because certain voices and perspectives are silenced or mocked or disregarded for whatever reason. It does not actually feel like a safe space in many ways, and in recognizing that I’m privileged, I’m an elected official, that I’m white, all of these things—and for me it doesn’t feel safe. I can imagine it might not feel safe for other people.”


Thanks, 
Andy Olshin

On May 13, 2021, at 5:40 AM, Tim McCormick <tmccormick@...> wrote:


recent story on Built For Zero, in Next City:
"Bakersfield is the first city in California to achieve functional zero for any category, and Maguire says that’s an important milestone in a state with an infamously tough housing crisis.

“[Bakersfield] is not L.A., but it’s a decent-sized city combined with a huge rural county,” Maguire says. “It’s a large, complex geography in one of the highest-cost states in America, with conservative politicians and lots of things that would make people say, ‘That’s not the place to go solve homelessness.’ But actually, Bakersfield did it.”

One reason why Bakersfield has had success in reducing its chronically homeless population is because the Housing Authority of the County of Kern has committed time and resources to helping. Heather Kimmel was leading Built for Zero work at the California Veterans Assistance Foundation before joining the housing authority, where she now works as assistant executive director. The Housing Authority of the County of Kern has been uniquely committed to serving people experiencing homelessness for years, Kimmel says, but more housing authorities are starting to focus explicitly on the issue.

“The link between the housing authority’s resources and ending homelessness is becoming more and more clear,” Kimmel says. “A community can’t effectively address homelessness without a strong partnership with the housing authority.”

Sounds good, right? Solutions Journalism! 

with apologies, I find I once again have a contrarian take... see below cartoon
<IMG_3276.jpg>
<IMG_3277.jpg>

@tmccormick: 
how the story went..How the situation's going..
Chronic homeless reduced by 70 people; 
total, by PIT count, increased by 570 people, 27%, in a year.
Perhaps better story is, why we're hearing #BuiltForZero story, vs of the less attention-deserving poor?
 c/@anikasinghlemar @JakeMaguire


as I tweeted to story author, editor, Next City co-founder acquaintance, and #BuiltForZero program head Jake Maguire. 

Not so incidentally, I recently watched Maguire present to Portland area's  homelessnes policy board, A Home For Everyone.  AHFE's Executive Committee has basically preemptorily adopted BuiltForZero's program and policy guidance, with no public discussion, in a manner and direction I find rather problematic for multiple reasons.



On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 5:27 AM Tim McCormick via groups.io <tmccormick=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

POWER TO THE PUBLIC: TACKLING HOMELESSNESS

Join us for an event featuring the book's authors and Built for Zero leaders.
May 13, 2021

<IMG_3274.jpg>

Online event today 10am PDT, 1pm EDT, featuring #BuiltForZero program from Community Solutions, and the well-known founder of CS, Roseanne Haggerty. 

You MUST register here: 
** If any issues, contact hosts Community Solutions - I am not running this, won't be able to help. **

Built For Zero is a very significant program/org that recently got huge funding boost from the MacArthur Foundation.  

They have a particular approach to defining and achieving "functional zero" homelessness for target populations -- typically, either chronic or veteran homelessness. 

This particular webinar appears to be looking especially at an  "Public Interest Technology," and features authors of recent book on this. #BuiltForZero is a key example discussed in the book.  

From what I know and can see, I really recommend this webinar. If you haven't yet heard about BuiltForZero in your community, chances are you will before long, and your officials / agency heads have already. Including recently in Portland, -- where basically their program was adopted straight out by A Home For Everyone, Executive Committee, without public discussion or consultation with the Coordinating Board. 

Could be fine, great, in outcome -- I don't know, I'm just skeptical as usual, especially when they didn't ask us our views on it. 
The Executive Committee peremptorily chose Community Solutions - seems like the typical amusing ironic way of the world, from my p.o.v., but who asked my opinion on that anyway, ever? ;)

--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 
--
--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


--
Elise Aymer
Co-founder, Critical Diversity Solutions
Pronouns: She/her

Thanks for your message!

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