Date   

online event today Weds 7-8pm: Safe Sleeping Sites for all, proposed in San Francisco

Tim McCormick
 

Creating A Place for All: A Conversation with Supervisor Rafael Mandelman on Safe Sleeping Sites
Creating-A-Safe-Place-for-All-event_2021-02-24_Rafael-Mandelman.png

About this event
The number of people experiencing homelessness in San Francisco has seen dramatic growth since the start of the pandemic. The shelter-in-place order, job loss, and the closing of shelters across the city have left many people with nowhere to go, but the sidewalk.

TogetherSF is hosting a conversation with San Francisco District 8 (Castro, Twin Peaks, Glen Park, Mission, Diamond Heights, Noe Valley) Supervisor Rafael Mandelman about his Place for All legislation. This legislation will create a network of temporary safe sleeping sites (designated sites for tents that are connected with City services) with the intent to accommodate all unhoused, unsheltered people. He will discuss how this strategy will open up more options for individuals experiencing homelessness and get them off the streets.

TogetherSF aims to provide everyone with access to the information, connections, and actions to make a difference in our city. That is why we're committed to learning more about street homelessness and what we all can do to support those experiencing homelessness. Join us Wednesday, February 24 from 7:00 - 8:00 pm.

You read the full legislation here: https://sfgov.legistar.com/View.ashx?M=F&ID=8870152&GUID=2AF688B7-F520-4D29-9E30-6256A52489DC.

You can also read Supervisor Mandelman's recent San Francisco Chronicle op-ed on his proposed legislation here: https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/San-Francisco-needs-to-designate-safe-sleeping-15741302.php.

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: City Council meeting starting now 9:30am

Dave Weaver
 

Thanks for the heads up!

On Wed, Feb 24, 2021 at 9:29 AM Houseless First <houselessfirst@...> wrote:

Portland City Council meeting today 9:30am.

agenda:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

livestream: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/video/player/?tab=live


there's a public comment about Hazelnut Grove at start of agenda. 


City Council meeting starting now 9:30am

Houseless First
 

Portland City Council meeting today 9:30am.

agenda:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/auditor/26997

livestream: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/video/player/?tab=live


there's a public comment about Hazelnut Grove at start of agenda. 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Joseph Purkey
 

I'm so glad that was useful, Melinda! Yes, that part of design can be a low cost addition to a design, if done carefully. We did look at an aligned layout as well (like a scaled down city grid) as part of the initial design process, but it didn't gain us much in efficiency and all the stakeholders agreed that the loop layout was much more where they would prefer to live. Often every dollar is squeezed out of a development in an effort to be fiscally responsible, but those initial numbers are only the most immediate part of the equation, not necessarily the best value or the right solution for the end user. This one decision would have saved pennies at best to create a site with so much less soul. 

Sorry, I'm getting carried away and pontificating about my small part of the puzzle. I've really enjoyed learning from all the people on this list doing such great work! Thank you all for all the countless hours advocating for our neighbors!

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 | cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021, 8:11 PM Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:
Joe, thank you for introducing me/us to the concept of biophilic design, something many of us intuitively know - but you provided explanation, examples, and science that can help us effectively advocate. And I see elements in the photos of St. John’s Village that could easily, it seems, be integrated into other projects with some care. I so appreciate this contribution.

Melinda Henning
Solutions for Supportive Homes
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 2:20 PM, Sandra Comstock <sandra@...> wrote:


If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Melinda Henning
 

Joe, thank you for introducing me/us to the concept of biophilic design, something many of us intuitively know - but you provided explanation, examples, and science that can help us effectively advocate. And I see elements in the photos of St. John’s Village that could easily, it seems, be integrated into other projects with some care. I so appreciate this contribution.

Melinda Henning
Solutions for Supportive Homes
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 2:20 PM, Sandra Comstock <sandra@...> wrote:


If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Sandra Comstock
 

If there are couples who wish to be housed together that is a good thing... otherwise single occupancy is best from what ive gathered from our folks living outside 
Dr. Sandra C. Comstock, Executive Director
Hygiene4All

1327 Tacoma Street # 118

Portland, Or 97202 

Email: Sandra@...
Phone: (857) 928 2408  

Website: h4apdx.org
Data & Policy Collective:  n2npdx.org


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:08 PM Lauren Everett <Le28@...> wrote:
The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Lauren Everett <Le28@...>
 

The interior of the pods at St. Johns Village are nicer too! One thing I noticed about this LA village that's interesting is that they are for two people...my understanding is that this isn't best practice. Interested in what other folks think.


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:03 PM Joseph Purkey <jpurkey@...> wrote:
This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 



--
Lauren Everett, MUS
Student, Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Studies   
College of Urban & Public Affairs
Portland State University
__________________________


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Joseph Purkey
 

This is a great option for emergency sheltering! Quick and cheap and fitting many people are all priorities for that need. I wouldn't want it used as transitional housing though because of the points others have brought up about how the buildings and site lack humanizing or softening elements. I wasn't able to completely realize my dreams for the St Johns Village site, but am very happy with the amount of biophilic design we were able to include with site layout, buildings, and vegetation. It cost more and took longer to realize than the LA site, but is much better suited to longer term living and the needs associated with transitioning off the street.

-Joe

Joseph Purkey, Principal
Convergence Architecture
Pronouns: he/him/his
7302 N Richmond Ave | Portland, OR 97203
tel. 503.308.1028, ext. 102 
| cell 503.752.8349
jpurkey@...
www.convergencearch.com

Facebook | Houzz | LinkedIn


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 11:13 AM Jayme Delson <jayme@...> wrote:
Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Jayme Delson
 

Hi,
I suspect the creators of this lash up, consider it transitional housing  (housing first).  Keeping with that myth, it would not matter how it was laid out trees or no really in my opinion, if someone is to stay here two weeks on their way to their own nice cottage, with a bit of a yard.

Given prevailing reality,  with nothing for most to transition to, we in my opinion will need way more than a few trees and a fixed layout, for me to be anything but sickened from seeing this.

Where i live, the homeless often call this prison lite, and i feel the same way. 

People with no home, do use jail to get a few warm nights rest, and a bit of medial care, often they know the right laws to brake to get in for just a few days.  That is what this could be useful for.

I presume the people who created this mean well,  if so thank you for that!
Lets do this for people in need ( and all who so wish) in a kind, comprenhisive,  and uplifting way, intouch with the reality that there is nothing to transition to for most, and done well, why would one want to.
Cheers,

Jayme Delson


On 2/23/2021 9:52 AM, Tommy Kiser wrote:
Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Metro Garage Severe Weather Shelter

Keith Wilson
 

Tim & PDX Shelter Forum – Good Morning.

 

I hope you are warm and well.

 

I was fortunate to volunteer during last week’s severe weather shelter at the Metro building parking structure that was managed by Multnomah County and JOHS. Here is a post with photos and the experience, Metro Garage Severe Winter Shelter .

 

Our efforts are being noticed by the city and county. Great job to everyone.

 

Looking forward to our next discussion.

 

Keith

 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Tommy Kiser
 

Yeah agree that more trees and foliage would be beneficial in a number of ways.

Cheers,
-Tommy

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:46 AM, Melinda Henning <Melinda@...> wrote:

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Melinda Henning
 

I would never line them up like that, but do a more curved arrangement even if that meant fewer units in the space. Also, if the units have to be replicas of each other, soft that institutional feel with interesting large potted plants or at least minimal attractive landscaping. 

Melinda Henning
High Stakes Presentation Consulting
415-806-9161

On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:12 AM, Margaret Zebroski <peggyz50@...> wrote:


Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Margaret Zebroski
 

Inspirational? More like a cozy outdoor prison... 


Re: Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Dave Weaver
 

That looks wonderful!  Very inspirational.
Thanks for sharing Angie.

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 9:28 AM Angie Gilbert <kaytayang@...> wrote:
The colorful community was built in just 13 weeks! A colorful village of 40 tiny homes opened up in Los Angeles earlier this month. While each 64-foot square unit can only hold one to two people, the project as a whole is a huge step forward when it comes to solving one of the city's biggest cris...

View the article.
https://flip.it/yeZP7B

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/fiu6d3

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 


Article: Los Angeles Just Opened a Tiny Home Village to House the Homeless

Angie Gilbert
 

The colorful community was built in just 13 weeks! A colorful village of 40 tiny homes opened up in Los Angeles earlier this month. While each 64-foot square unit can only hold one to two people, the project as a whole is a huge step forward when it comes to solving one of the city's biggest cris...

View the article.
https://flip.it/yeZP7B

View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/fiu6d3

Find your favorite topics on Flipboard. Download here.
https://flip.it/q2c-.t 


March 1, forum #4, Alternative Shelter proposals now! rescheduled to 3/1, with more speakers!

Tim McCormick
 

Forum #4: Alternative Shelter & Housing - Request for Public Involvement

 

This is truly shaping up to be an exciting, fun, and very timely event. Please join us Monday March 1, 10am-12pm PST, to explore and suggest bold, varied, and practical ideas for new shelter options in Portland, at an open, online, forum,. We will pose this question to live panelists, and ahead of time to the community to submit video responses: How can we quickly provide safe, private shelter or housing to all unsheltered residents?  

 

We will invite and discuss current and possible responses to the City/County's RFPQ (Request For Programmatic Qualifications, i.e. proposals) on "alternative shelter" that is due on March 9th. 

 

Confirmed guest speakers / panelists:

 

Register: http://register.pdxshelterforum.org.

More information - event page: http://forum4.pdxshelterforum.org.

 

 

 

In keeping with the goal of complementing official processes, and our general orientation, we seek to center and prioritize in this event the viewpoints of those closest to homelessness. Also, to particularly explore models of shelter/housing that are more self-determining and self-governing. 

 

We're excited to welcome as special guest speaker/panelist, General Jeff, Chair of Los Angeles Skid Row Neighborhood Council Formation Committee. Twitter: @GoSkidRowGo.

Jeff is a longtime community organizer in the houseless community of LA and the Skid Row area near downtown, "promoting the Skid Row resident's grass-roots Positive Movement!! (since 2006)". See more at: skidrowneighborhoodcouncil.com:

Also, Dr. Sharon Meieran, Multnomah County Commissioner for District 1. :

 

Also invited, may be on live panel or submit a video/written response:  

  • Dan Ryan, Portland City Councilmember, Commissioner of Housing Bureau and Bureau of Development Services, and city liaison to JOHS

  • Hazelnut Grove, C3PO Villages, and Dignity Village current residents

  • Joint Office of Homeless Services (JOHS) representatives 

  • and other officials and community leaders

Also, written or audio or video responses are invited from houseless and other community members, as an alternative way to participate. 

 

Registering and attending

We are doing registration on Eventbrite like last time, with tickets free or by optional donation, Zoom meeting access for up to 100 registrants, and with options to watch via livestream (YouTube and Facebook) with or without registering. If you'd just like to get the video recording later, or watch livestream, remember to select that option on the registration form so we can conserve our Zoom attendee slots. 

 

Event page

http://forum4.pdxshelterforum.org.

This is a central and steadily-updated page with all the event info, agenda, notes on how to register and/or watch livestream, how to submit questions or comments by various channels before or during the event, and also live notes.

 

Donation and sponsorship

The event is suggested donation - you are welcome even if you can't donate financially, but are also welcome to donate/sponsor (and be recognized for it live at the event, by your and/or organization's name, and on the archive video and permanent event/notes page, unless you tell us otherwise). This allows us to offer honoraria to panelists and respondents who may need or request them, and to be able to continue organizing these events.

 

Everyone welcomed by all means possible

If you could use some assistance to be able to attend, please let us know how we can help, either in the comment when registering, or email us at pdxshelterforum@..., or call/text us at (503) 482-8314‬.


Also, we are seeking to be very flexible in how participants can engage in this event: from panelists engaging live with attendees in main Zoom space, to others submitting responses in advance to the key event questions to be played or read at event, to open publics who can watch via livestream on Facebook or on YouTube which offers rewindability, and immediately archived and shareable video. We are investigating how to support captioning on the livestream, please let us know any suggestions. 

 

We also welcome comments, questions, proposals via all possible channels before and during the event -- Zoom chat, email, text, voicemail, Facebook comments on livestream, or adding to the public open event document notes. The event and chat channel will be recorded and made available after the event on our YouTube channel and our Facebook group. After the event, a survey will be sent to all registrants and known attendees, on which you can provide anonymous and open feedback, which we welcome. After the event, a survey will be sent to all registrants and known attendees, on which you can provide anonymous and open feedback, which we welcome. 

 

Please share!

We encourage you to share this event announcement in your communities, and we particularly invite and urge you to invite all houseless neighbors and residents. Your/their presence, questions, and comments, spoken or written or video-recorded, will be prioritized at the event. You can find a link to post cards that you can print out and distribute on the event page. Share this email, and via social media with hashtag #pdxshelterforum.

 

We hope to see, hear, and connect with you Tuesday, and before and after, and we invite your brightest and best ideas, and support, for transforming the homelessness situation in Portland. 

 

the organizers, 

Tim McCormick - PDX Shelter Forum, HousingWiki, Village Collaborative

Sean Green - PDX Shelter Forum, Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods, Shelter Now.

 

co-hosts: 

PDX Shelter Forum - pdxshelterforum.org.
Shelter Now
Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN)

[+ your organization here?]


today Tues 3-5pm, tune in to AHFE Safety Off the Streets workgroup mtg

Tim McCormick
 

please join today for 3-5pm monthly, open meeting of the Safety Off the Streets Workgroup, a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board of A Home For Everyone:  
   Google Meet:  meet.google.com/svq-vkja-ykr
   Phone: 1 484-424-4823  (PIN: 661 453 175#)
Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 2.42.53 PM.png
Also, we now have an open document to gather info and meeting notes etc about SOS Workgroup:  http://sosw.pdxshelterforum.org. You are welcome to take notes from the  meeting here, this helps out those who can't attend. 

You can add this to your calendar with this Calendar Event (for recurring meeting). This is now on the new PDX Shelter Forum public Google Calendar, which you can subscribe to to get notice of all events like this that we add. 

AGENDA
15 min - 1. Welcome & Introductions - All
45 min - 2. Strategic Planning Engagement - Joshua Bates,Paul Stark
15 min - 3. Severe Weather Response Update Celeste Duvall
15 min - 4. General Updates & Announcements All

ABOUT SOS
Safety Off the Streets Workgroup is the shelter, immediate-response focused part, and advisory group, of the county homelessness administrative authority (A Home For Everyone). So it's a key place, in terms of funding / general policy, where many of us in PDX Shelter Forum might engage given our interests here. See 'About SOS'' below for more about it. 

http://ahomeforeveryone.net/safety-off-the-streets-workgroup.
"In October 2014, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup was created as a subcommittee of the Coordinating Board and charged with developing an action plan, that prioritized strategies for increasing options for safety and a good night’s sleep, such that no women, children, or adults with disabilities have to sleep on the streets of Multnomah County by January 2017. The action plan includes policy and funding recommendations from the workgroup’s analysis of the need and what it would take to build a system to begin to address that need. [...]

"Going forward, the Safety off the Streets Workgroup will oversee implementation of shelter development, coordinated entry, best practices strategy, monitor new shelter initiatives, develop public spaces engagement/management strategies, oversee severe weather response, oversee development and implementation of street and shelter count methodology, and shape safety off the streets related budget recommendations."

--
Tim McCormick
Moderator PDX Shelter Forum, Editor at HousingWiki,
Organizer at Village Collaborative
Portland, Oregon 


Re: tiny house village

Keith Wilson
 

Great article, Mary. Especially like the quote:

“The one thing we all agreed on was that the enemy was not the city but poverty and racism and homelessness.”

 

So important to stay focused on the mission and values.

 

 

From: pdxshelterforum@groups.io <pdxshelterforum@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mary Jaron Kelley via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2021 8:40 PM
To: pdxshelterforum@groups.io
Subject: [pdxshelterforum] tiny house village

 

Tiny-house village for the homeless in Northeast Philly is OK'd by officials

 

https://www.inquirer.com/news/homeless-tiny-house-village-northeast-philadelphia-west-philadelphia-20210213.html

 

 

Mary Jaron Kelley
Associate Program Director | North Portland Neighborhood Services
Office of Community & Civic Life
Historic Kenton Firehouse
2209 N. Schofield Street

Portland, Oregon 97217
503-823-8877 (cell) new number

mary@...

www. Facebook.com/NorthPortlandNeighborhoodServices
http://www.npnscommunity.org

 

I am in the office Monday-Thursday.

Pronouns: she/her/hers

 


Metro- affordable housing

Mary Jaron Kelley <mary@...>
 

https://www.oregonmetro.gov/news/metro-temporarily-leases-future-affordable-housing-site-nonprofit?utm_source=Metro+contacts&utm_campaign=6421097eae-EMAIL_DIGEST_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e7c2405cf5-6421097eae-278270770&mc_cid=6421097eae&mc_eid=6c084621f5

 

Mary Jaron Kelley
Associate Program Director | North Portland Neighborhood Services
Office of Community & Civic Life
Historic Kenton Firehouse
2209 N. Schofield Street

Portland, Oregon 97217
503-823-8877 (cell) new number

mary@...

www. Facebook.com/NorthPortlandNeighborhoodServices
http://www.npnscommunity.org

 

I am in the office Monday-Thursday.

Pronouns: she/her/hers

 


tiny house village

Mary Jaron Kelley <mary@...>
 

Tiny-house village for the homeless in Northeast Philly is OK'd by officials

 

https://www.inquirer.com/news/homeless-tiny-house-village-northeast-philadelphia-west-philadelphia-20210213.html

 

 

Mary Jaron Kelley
Associate Program Director | North Portland Neighborhood Services
Office of Community & Civic Life
Historic Kenton Firehouse
2209 N. Schofield Street

Portland, Oregon 97217
503-823-8877 (cell) new number

mary@...

www. Facebook.com/NorthPortlandNeighborhoodServices
http://www.npnscommunity.org

 

I am in the office Monday-Thursday.

Pronouns: she/her/hers

 

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