Wooden Sailboat for Coos Bay?


 

I talked to our local sailmaker, Kendall, today. He's settled in Coos Bay, commuting to work at Fred Wahl's shipyard in Reedsport. Alas, he's gonna be closing the sail loft in Eugene. He doesn't make enough from it to be worth the bother of driving up here, and he'd like to have more weekend time with his family. Two low-water seasons in a row at the Mudhole can't have helped. He may move some of the the tools to the Bay Area and do some repairs for longtime customers. It'll be hard for the Fern Ridge sailors to not have a handy sail loft, but I completely understand why Kendall can't make it work.

But, here's an interesting topic for us to discuss: What's a good wooden sailboat design, under 2,000 lb. for trailering ease, able to comfortably carry two adults and two kids, for a big, shallow, windy bay? Kendall says Fred Wahl has a nice wood shop. I didn't ask (it wasn't a good cell phone connection) if he was gonna build the boat alone, have shipyard carpenters help, or just pay them to build it. Whatever, ease of construction would speed the build whoever does the work.

I'm sure we'll have lots of fun chewing up this topic. ;o)

Most of Coos Bay turns into mud flats at low tide. I'd favor something with a leeboard or two... Since I was talking about an Atkin boat the other day, I'll throw this one out. Wouldn't it be wonderful to see one of these sailing our coastal bays? :o) Of course the construction would have to be modernized for trailering, but Kendall works in the design office of the shipyard. Gretchen already has a tabernacle and simple rig.

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Sail/Gretchen.html

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The world is changed not by the self-regarding, but by men and women prepared to make fools of themselves. (P.D. James)


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To illustrate:

http://www.coots.org/MapImages/Coast/CoosBay-18587.png

Here's a boat built to dry out in one of the sloughs off Coos Bay. A "flattie" from Chapelle's American Sailing Craft. We visited the builder when he was still putting the bottom on, years ago... Launched in 2017.

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv

On 5/3/2021 9:04 PM, I wrote:
...
But, here's an interesting topic for us to discuss: What's a good wooden sailboat design, under 2,000 lb. for trailering ease, able to comfortably carry two adults and two kids, for a big, shallow, windy bay?
...
Most of Coos Bay turns into mud flats at low tide.
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language. (Oscar Wilde)
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Electri-Cal
 

Chesapeake Bay "flattie" comes to mind.  From the book by Little, there are loads of small sail flat bottomed boats for thin waters.  That was much of what I used for Surprise, and my simple to build lapstake sail boat would do all that, except I changed it to centerboard, and made it a one person controls everything from one seat type.  Sails for sharpies are simple, and the boats are stable but carry a lot, like Surprise does.  Fastest build is also the road to quick pleasure.  So  I endorse most anything from ---  The Sharpie Book, by mr. Little --  a paperback with great details for a whole array of possibilities.

Later,   Cal


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

My friend Andew Brenneman just launched his 27 that he's just restored. We had it's first sail in 10 yrs last Wednesday.
He needs a couple small sail repairs, particularly the mainsail clew grommet.
I wonder if Kendal would let Andrew use a grommet punch for a few hours.
It seems most the sail work around here is small repairs. I wonder if the Coots, or EYC could have a communal sail repair tool box.
Seems like a good community resource.
-Jove


On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 9:04 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I talked to our local sailmaker, Kendall, today. He's settled in Coos
Bay, commuting to work at Fred Wahl's shipyard in Reedsport. Alas, he's
gonna be closing the sail loft in Eugene. He doesn't make enough from it
to be worth the bother of driving up here, and he'd like to have more
weekend time with his family. Two low-water seasons in a row at the
Mudhole can't have helped. He may move some of the the tools to the Bay
Area and do some repairs for longtime customers. It'll be hard for the
Fern Ridge sailors to not have a handy sail loft, but I completely
understand why Kendall can't make it work.

But, here's an interesting topic for us to discuss: What's a good wooden
sailboat design, under 2,000 lb. for trailering ease, able to
comfortably carry two adults and two kids, for a big, shallow, windy
bay? Kendall says Fred Wahl has a nice wood shop. I didn't ask (it
wasn't a good cell phone connection) if he was gonna build the  boat
alone, have shipyard carpenters help, or just pay them to build it.
Whatever, ease of construction would speed the build whoever does the work.

I'm sure we'll have lots of fun chewing up this topic. ;o)

Most of Coos Bay turns into mud flats at low tide. I'd favor something
with a leeboard or two... Since I was talking about an Atkin boat the
other day, I'll throw this one out. Wouldn't it be wonderful to see one
of these sailing our coastal bays? :o) Of course the construction would
have to be modernized for trailering, but Kendall works in the design
office of the shipyard. Gretchen already has a tabernacle and simple rig.

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Sail/Gretchen.html

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The world is changed not by the self-regarding, but by men and women
prepared to make fools of themselves. (P.D. James)


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By Reuel Parker:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071580131/themotherofal-20

Howard Chapelle was a great fan of sharpies, and encouraged using them for pleasure boats. He drew several sharpie yachts. Look for his American Sailing Craft (used, out of print) and American Small Sailing Craft, a real classic!

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0393031438/themotherofal-20

Of course Phil Bolger was also a sharpie fan and gave a lot of thought to their design. The Bolger sharpie that would suit Kendall best would be the 25' Black Skimmer, which might not be too heavy for him to trailer.

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=bolger+black+skimmer

On 5/4/2021 6:27 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
Chesapeake Bay "flattie" comes to mind.  From the book by Little, there are loads of small sail flat bottomed boats for thin waters.  That was much of what I used for Surprise, and my simple to build lapstake sail boat would do all that, except I changed it to centerboard, and made it a one person controls everything from one seat type.  Sails for sharpies are simple, and the boats are stable but carry a lot, like Surprise does.  Fastest build is also the road to quick pleasure.  So  I endorse most anything from ---  The Sharpie Book, by mr. Little --  a paperback with great details for a whole array of possibilities.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. (Philip K. Dick)
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Kendall talked about maybe leaving some equipment in his loft at Scott's yard for people to do their own repairs. I'll let you all know what happens.

On 5/4/2021 10:06 AM, Jove wrote:
My friend Andew Brenneman just launched his 27 that he's just restored. We had it's first sail in 10 yrs last Wednesday.
He needs a couple small sail repairs, particularly the mainsail clew grommet.
I wonder if Kendal would let Andrew use a grommet punch for a few hours.
It seems most the sail work around here is small repairs. I wonder if the Coots, or EYC could have a communal sail repair tool box.
Seems like a good community resource.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least. (Herman Melville)
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That's what Ted Chism built for Coos Bay:

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

Built from a drawing published in American Sailing Craft:

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv

On 5/4/2021 6:27 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
Chesapeake Bay "flattie" comes to mind.
...

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I want people to talk to one another no matter what their difference of opinion might be. (Studs Terkel)
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Electri-Cal
 

I have the hand punches, grommets, the twine, fid and hand palm here.  I did a few years ago, on several sails, you are welcome to do a few here if you like.  I have books to show in detail also.  Happy to help, let me know if that would work.  Maybe we can talk at the coots event tomorrow.

See ya,  Cal


Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

The photo I see is of a V bottom boat ashore, probably at low tide.
The illustration (plan) from Chapelle seems to be a sharpie, with a
really flat bottom. I find both attractive, but doubt they are the
same.
- Gerard Mittelstaedt
McAllen, TX

On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 11:30 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

To illustrate:

http://www.coots.org/MapImages/Coast/CoosBay-18587.png

Here's a boat built to dry out in one of the sloughs off Coos Bay. A
"flattie" from Chapelle's American Sailing Craft. We visited the builder
when he was still putting the bottom on, years ago... Launched in 2017.

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv

On 5/3/2021 9:04 PM, I wrote:
...
But, here's an interesting topic for us to discuss: What's a good wooden
sailboat design, under 2,000 lb. for trailering ease, able to
comfortably carry two adults and two kids, for a big, shallow, windy
bay?
> ...
Most of Coos Bay turns into mud flats at low tide.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of
course, language. (Oscar Wilde)


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Gerard Mittelstaedt -- mittel48@gmail.com
McAllen, Texas
USA


 

The boats are one and the same. Some of us Coots visited Ted Chism at his place just up Joe Ney Slough from the Charleston boatyard in February of 2008. I saw the drawing from the Smithsonian he used to make the plans for the boat, and we loaned him American Sailing Craft so he could read what Chapelle had to say about the boat.

https://flic.kr/p/2kXo2QL

https://flic.kr/p/2kXx4oL

https://flic.kr/p/2kXo2Mj

There weren't any offsets of construction drawing from the Smithy, just a full size version of the illustration in the book (Ted had never seen the book, he just ordered some drawings of likely sounding boats from the museum and chose the flattie). He made his own offset table by measuring the drawing, and worked out the construction from Chapelle drawings of similar boats. I think he said he was going to put skipjack-like head on the bow, and maybe he said he was going to use a gaff main. It was a long time ago... And we still haven't got the book back! ;o)

It was indeed low tide when I took the photo of the flattie on the mud. Ted knew he needed a boat that could dry out because there's not much water in Joe Ney Slough during spring low tides, or even neaps. <g>

A sharpie wouldn't be so fat, though you can't really tell much from and end-on telephoto shot. The old-time builders discovered that a fat flat-bottom boat sailed better if you gave the bottom some V aft.

On 5/8/2021 8:00 PM, Gerard M wrote:
The photo I see is of a V bottom boat ashore, probably at low tide.
The illustration (plan) from Chapelle seems to be a sharpie, with a
really flat bottom. I find both attractive, but doubt they are the
same.
Here's a boat built to dry out in one of the sloughs off Coos Bay. A
"flattie" from Chapelle's American Sailing Craft. We visited the builder
when he was still putting the bottom on, years ago... Launched in 2017.

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. (Patrick F. McManus)
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