Topics

winch or capstan suggestion?


Mark Neuhaus
 

Hi group,

My Tolman skiff on the trailer is 25 feet long and the street in front of my house is 24 feet wide, so no way can I back the trailer up my driveway.

So, anyone got a suggestion for a 110 volt winch that I can anchor into the driveway? Or even attach it to the trailer so I can turn it on and off as I steer the trailer up using a tri-pod of casters under the tongue.  I've got a harbor freight 12 volt winch, but it supposedly can only be used for 15 seconds at a time with too much time in between to cool off.

The boat/trailer combo weighed 2700 pounds empty when picked up in April and my driveway rises maybe four feet over a fifty foot run.

I've considered capstans and rope, and attached is a screen capture from a  video of a homemade one:        
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXK4LZJRDjE

If you've got one of those right angle gears you want to sell cheap, or know of a place to get one, that would be great.

Thanks,
Mark


Case Turner
 

Of mounted to your trailer why no use a 12volt winch and battery on the trailer? 

Any WARN or knock off winch rated for that weight would work.

Sent from not here

On Nov 14, 2020, at 5:44 PM, Mark Neuhaus <moonlitturtle1934@...> wrote:


Hi group,

My Tolman skiff on the trailer is 25 feet long and the street in front of my house is 24 feet wide, so no way can I back the trailer up my driveway.

So, anyone got a suggestion for a 110 volt winch that I can anchor into the driveway? Or even attach it to the trailer so I can turn it on and off as I steer the trailer up using a tri-pod of casters under the tongue.  I've got a harbor freight 12 volt winch, but it supposedly can only be used for 15 seconds at a time with too much time in between to cool off.

The boat/trailer combo weighed 2700 pounds empty when picked up in April and my driveway rises maybe four feet over a fifty foot run.

I've considered capstans and rope, and attached is a screen capture from a  video of a homemade one:        
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXK4LZJRDjE

If you've got one of those right angle gears you want to sell cheap, or know of a place to get one, that would be great.

Thanks,
Mark

<vlcsnap-capstan.png>


David Luckhardt
 

I have a very similar problem with my Caledonia Yawl with a driveway a bit steeper but boat much lighter.  Tried that same HF winch with a 110->12v adapter and it takes SEVERAL LIFETIMES to winch it that far  -- far too much hassle.

 

Consider these options:

1.  An electric trailer dolly.  These come up on Craigslist fairly often in the $500-800 range, and the ones with the 110 extension cord might be able to handle that much weight and angle.  Test carefully as you'll get hurt if it can't hold on the driveway surface!

2.  Front tow hitch.  This might give you the ability to put it in the right spot to switch back to the rear hitch, depending on a lot of factors.


Dan
 

Mark. It's a bit slow, but quite powerful--and I seem to have to move
recalcitrant trailers alluhtime--but, i often use HF chainfalls to pull
things around. I often have to lift boats from one trailer to
another--weighing upwards of a ton or two. i even use them to help in
felling trees. If you can rig an adequate tongue carrier, then the trailer
can be pulled headfirst up your driveway from a 90-degree pivot. If that
pivot is far enough back to allow the swing, of course. This also assumes
that gravity will help in the egress. The reverse pivot would only require
a set of wheel chocks to do the swinging. Or, get yourself a tractor...Dan


Roger Padvorac
 

Mark,
You might take a look at this page:
https://www.grainger.com/category/material-handling/lifting-pulling-positioning
The winches subcategory has a wide range of electric, air, hydraulic, and hand cranked winches.

Even if I don't buy what I'm looking for here, Grainger is usually pretty good in helping me learn the range of available choices, and which kinds of choices are remotely within my budget.

I stopped looking at harbor freight because they are usually such a poor long-term investment. I've been using some of my power tools for about 40 years (its hard to be certain at this point) and my experience with harbor freight is they don't sell tools that will work well for decades. Worse yet they sell sets and kits, but not the individual pieces when they need to be replaced.

I would get a winch because it has more control than a capstan. You can stop the winch,and everything will stay in its current place while you leave the winch to go do something. You could tie off the rope going around the capstan, but that isn't nearly as quick, easy, or reliable as just turning the winch off when suddenly things don't go as expected.

Some winches have a reverse, some have a brake to control the cable as it unwinds, and some have neither.

In a setup like yours, I'd like to have a reverse or brake.

Sincerely,
Roger


Quoting Mark Neuhaus <moonlitturtle1934@gmail.com>:

Hi group,

My Tolman skiff on the trailer is 25 feet long and the street in front of
my house is 24 feet wide, so no way can I back the trailer up my driveway.

So, anyone got a suggestion for a 110 volt winch that I can anchor into the
driveway? Or even attach it to the trailer so I can turn it on and off as I
steer the trailer up using a tri-pod of casters under the tongue. I've got
a harbor freight 12 volt winch, but it supposedly can only be used for 15
seconds at a time with too much time in between to cool off.

The boat/trailer combo weighed 2700 pounds empty when picked up in April
and my driveway rises maybe four feet over a fifty foot run.

I've considered capstans and rope, and attached is a screen capture from a
video of a homemade one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXK4LZJRDjE

If you've got one of those right angle gears you want to sell cheap, or
know of a place to get one, that would be great.

Thanks,
Mark



 

Single- width driveway? If it's double-width you can probably manage to back the trailer in, with practice. I got a _lot_ better at trailer backing after I got some neighbors who park a line of dead cars along the street across from my driveway. ;o) My street is probably about 24' wide (residential street with room for three cars abreast -- two parked and one driving down the middle), then subtract the width of the cars, and Lazy Jack on her trailer is about 21', so similar mathematics to your situation. Same length pickup. Aiming for a 10' wide shelter opening about 8' in from the street. My driveway cutout is only single-width, but the driveway is double-width. I just back over the curb on that side. Somebody's suggestion to try a front-mounted hitch would make moving the trailer around much easier, and probably even make getting it in and out of the driveway doable with a single-width driveway.

I think using a winch or capstan would be a hassle if you're gonna keep the boat at home. OK if you're only bringing it home for the winter.

A fellow I know offered to GIVE me a fancy electric powered trailer dolly because it didn't have the power to get his 15' catboat up a slight slope in his driveway, so be careful if you shop for one. I'd love to have something like that for shuffling my trailers around, but his review made me leery of them for use on anything but flat, paved surfaces, of which I have few. I didn't take him up.

Good luck.

On 11/14/2020 5:43 PM, Mark N wrote:
Hi group,
My Tolman skiff on the trailer is 25 feet long and the street in front of my house is 24 feet wide, so no way can I back the trailer up my driveway.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)
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Bert's junk shop, next to the Embers nightclub on Hwy 99N in Eugene, is going out of business, and he's got a bunch of used garden tractors. When he wasn't going out of business he often thought his merchandise was more valuable than it deserved, but there are probably some deals now.

https://goo.gl/maps/vPqwSzhDxDJ3pofC6

Be prepared to put a trailer ball on the bow of the tractor. Otherwise your weight on the seat and the weight of the trailer tongue will lead to wheelies.

On 11/15/2020 8:01 AM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
...
Or, get yourself a tractor...Dan
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In Heaven, it is always Autumn. (John Donne)
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Mark Neuhaus
 

Hi folks,

Thank you all for the comments and suggestions. I've still got thinking to do on this project.

I should have realized that one of the limiting factors is not the length of the boat on the trailer (25'), but rather, the tongue to the axle, which is 19'.  Moonlit Turtle's trailer is 15' tongue to axle, and that has caused me to go up on the curb across the street to get aligned in the driveway once I've started backing up.

John, my driveway is 10' wide and is right up along the house, bushes on the other side. The trailer and boat are each 8' wide, so my aim has to be perfect to avoid hitting the house.  It has curbs all the way down to the sidewalk, so my aim has to be perfect to prevent damaging tires. 

I figure to bring the empty trailer home in the next week and give it a try. It's possible that if I can cut the arc perfectly, I can make it work. A two by four at the curb across the street might let me get up on my neighbor's parking strip for fine tuning the alignment. If not, I'm back to manually rotating the trailer (not a big problem) and getting it up the driveway in a speedy way so I'm out of the street. 

If all else fails, I get to gather all the hand and portable tools and make several trips to the storage yard to work on the boat during the winter and spring.

Thanks again.

Mark


 

If your driveway is single-width, with no room to cheat by going up on a curb, it's gonna be mighty difficult to back the boat into it. You'd have a greater chance of success with a hitch on the front of the truck. Some people prefer a front hitch over backing all the time, so you might find that you like it. <g>

If you're only bringing the boat home to work on it, and usually keep it at a storage lot, then you can put up with more hassle getting it in and out of the driveway. It's not like you'd need to do it every time you want to use the boat. You won't need a lot of power to get the boat up the driveway. Usually, the more power a winch or hoist has, the S-L-O-W-E-R it is. A block and tackle might do the trick. A "gun tackle" will probably be a good match of power and speed. Hook the becket block to the trailer, and have some way to snub and/or belay the fall handy. Use rope big enough to be easy on your hands, and decent blocks properly sized to the rope.

Good luck.

On 11/19/2020 1:09 AM, Mark N wrote:
...
John, my driveway is 10' wide and is right up along the house, bushes on the other side. The trailer and boat are each 8' wide, so my aim has to be perfect to avoid hitting the house.  It has curbs all the way down to the sidewalk, so my aim has to be perfect to prevent damaging tires.
...
If all else fails, I get to gather all the hand and portable tools and make several trips to the storage yard to work on the boat during the winter and spring.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In politics, absurdity is not a handicap. (Napoleon Bonaparte)
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