Topics

Willys


dan mulholland
 

One of our members wanted a post about my Willys wagon; want to send him a message, can't find his note for an address- so please reply to me and I'll write something up.

Dan


Case Turner
 

I say post it here. I’d like to hear more about it too.

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 12, 2021, at 11:15 AM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:


One of our members wanted a post about my Willys wagon; want to send him a message, can't find his note for an address- so please reply to me and I'll write something up.

Dan


Stephen Miller
 

Yes please do list here.  My son in law is restoring a Willy's so I'd love to see more on yours. 

Steve Miller

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 11:45 AM Case Turner <dirtsailor2003@...> wrote:
I say post it here. I’d like to hear more about it too.

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 12, 2021, at 11:15 AM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:


One of our members wanted a post about my Willys wagon; want to send him a message, can't find his note for an address- so please reply to me and I'll write something up.

Dan


johnacord
 

Hi Dan,

To the group or off list, either way.

John Acord
jcacord@...
Flatwater Electronics
www.flatwaterfarm.com
"Neurosurgery for computer looms."


 

For once I agree with Case. A lot of Ol's Coots are gearheads who like old iron, boaty or not. I won't punish you too badly for posting something without boats in it, Dan. Maybe you could post a picture of the Willys towing a boat. ;o)

On 2/12/2021 11:45 AM, Case wrote:
I say post it here. I’d like to hear more about it too.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
At sea a fellow comes out. Salt water is like wine, in that respect. (Herman Melville)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


dan mulholland
 

Alright,  remember, your asked!  

I was interested in the Willys wagons because my father/family had one when I was young, a 1949.  I remember standing up in the backseat while my mother had a friend teach her how to drive (on Munsel Lake road).  It was a 2 wheel drive model, with the WW2 flathead 4 for power. 

When I was 19, (1972) I saw one on hwy 126, close to Noti, on the side of the road.  A 1953, $200.  What a steal!   Cleared the blackberry vines out of it,  and drove it to Eugene.    A 1953 differs from a 1949 in the front grill and fenders, which got more chrome, and the engine was "hopped up" with a F head configuration- which added an overhead valve setup on the intake side, but kept the exhaust valves in the block.  A Florence friend John wanted to go to Olympia to pick up an engine for his truck, so off we went.  I quart oil per 60 miles.  John, being an aspiring mechanic, helped me do a "shade tree" overhaul.  There was a crack in the block, but it stopped just before piston travel, so who cares.  Anyway, that helped a lot and it ran OK for a few years.   Another friend in Florence had a father with a compressor and spray gun.  I'd been sanding away on the body- it had been repainted-during spring term at the U of O, when not studying...

So, the first picture is of Mike the painter, with the freshly painted wagon.   Our process consisted of Mike running the gun, while I picked the needles that fell off the trees out of the paint.   Mike had to wait every 30 seconds or so for the tired old compressor to have enough air to atomize the paint.   We both thought it looked pretty good.   Had to get it done before the wind came up, summertime at the coast and all.

After college, I got my first job in Corvallis.  The engine was tired again, and I searched for a replacement engine.  In Eugene, in  the pennysaver- or similar- the ad papers that existed before Craigslist-had an ad for a homemade tractor with a jeep engine.  $75 later I had another Fhead 4.   Block was good!  Had it overhauled by a machine shop in Corvallis.   I took the 3 speed transmission apart, and put in replacement "stuff".  It somehow still worked when I was done.   Also in Corvallis, had the kingpins replaced, so steering would work better, and, before embarking on a big trip, had the valves done at a shop in Corvallis, the owner had been a Studebaker dealer.  Which meant he had a speedometer gear for the transmission, the Studebakers used the same one.  And, in those days, there was a speedometer shop in Corvallis that could make the other end of the system work.  So, for the first time, there was a somewhat accurate speedometer.   Who knows how many miles ther are on the wagon, since there were no miles recorded for many years. 

The big trip happened in 1981.   I was lucky enough to be getting married, and the now long suffering woman hailed from Connecticut.  Decided to drive the wagon there; I figured it might be the last chance before we ran out of gasoline.  Expensive, too, at $1.35.  The second picture is from that trip.

John mentioned the Willystech list.  There used to be discussions about Willyspoints- how to talk your spouse into money and time for the jeep.   If you have a picture like this (3rd one), no problem!

On the trip, the wagon was not running well when we got to Toronto, so I took it to an AMC dealer for a look.  I looked around the corner,  and I had every mechanic they had looking at it.  We made it to Trumbull, CT, met the family-not a blonde in sight, Italians....and headed back via a southern route.  Managed to go low on transmission oil and fry the overdrive; it was overhauled by a good shop in Mississippi.  Worked our way west, visited my grandmothers in LA, and limped home with a burnt exhaust valve. 

Moved to Eugene, after a year in San Francisco getting another degree.  The Willys was gradually sinking into the back yard.  Two little girls, not much time for a car project.  I did build the Bolger Cartopper in the 90's, and it got me thinking about the rusty old wagon.  By now, it was hardly running, rust all over, no fuel to the engine, no power when it ran, oil leaks, etc.  I thought, with what I'd learned from building a boat with epoxy, maybe I could repair the rust with glass and resin!   About that time, my old friend John got back in touch with me; he offered to go through the engine.   He knew a lot more.  He mentioned that,  in the old days, as long as a camshaft had bumps, OK.  During this next overhaul,  welding and grinding the camshaft greatly improved the engine.

So, now there's rusty wagon with an overhauled engine ready to go back in.  I got a book about restoring cars; epoxy was in the "absolutely not" category.  So, I began the search for the "perfect body".  No, or minimal, Internet then.  I got a tip somehow that there were Willys in Virginia City, NV; I had a business trip to Las Vegas, so I drove down the family wagon to see what I could find.  Another digression-by 1953, most wagons sold were 4 wheel drive- only 235 2  wheel wagons were made.  The bodies are different, firewall and floor in particular.  I had to be flexible.  In Virginia City, I arrived on a Sunday morning, walked around looking for things, and found a 1956 4WD wagon, with many parts missing, behind a steel shop building.  A guy, driving a flatfender jeep arrived- his shop was for motorcycles- he was finishing up an Indian.  Anyway, the body was much less rusty than mine, and $300 bought the wreck.  I managed to tow it back to Eugene, after other fiascos, and started taking things apart. 

The restoration took 8 years and about $8000.  It was the "surviving teenage girls" restoration.  Frame off, installation of reproduction panels, moving metal from the old body to new, replacement of every piece of rubber, complete rewiring, etc.  The 4th picture is of bodywork on the rear, rust and dent repair galore.   Lots of welding.  Finished, pretty much, by 2000.

The last picture includes towing the Pelican sailboat.   The wagon runs well, after fighting with a few nagging details over the years.    With a following breeze, it gets decent fuel economy.  Much happier on secondary roads than freeways.   It's a great combination of slow, unsafe and noisy.  But, people love to see it out, and I enjoy driving the time machine around once and a while.

Dan



Case Turner
 

Thanks for the post! That’s quite the messabout! 

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 12, 2021, at 6:26 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:


Alright,  remember, your asked!  

I was interested in the Willys wagons because my father/family had one when I was young, a 1949.  I remember standing up in the backseat while my mother had a friend teach her how to drive (on Munsel Lake road).  It was a 2 wheel drive model, with the WW2 flathead 4 for power. 

When I was 19, (1972) I saw one on hwy 126, close to Noti, on the side of the road.  A 1953, $200.  What a steal!   Cleared the blackberry vines out of it,  and drove it to Eugene.    A 1953 differs from a 1949 in the front grill and fenders, which got more chrome, and the engine was "hopped up" with a F head configuration- which added an overhead valve setup on the intake side, but kept the exhaust valves in the block.  A Florence friend John wanted to go to Olympia to pick up an engine for his truck, so off we went.  I quart oil per 60 miles.  John, being an aspiring mechanic, helped me do a "shade tree" overhaul.  There was a crack in the block, but it stopped just before piston travel, so who cares.  Anyway, that helped a lot and it ran OK for a few years.   Another friend in Florence had a father with a compressor and spray gun.  I'd been sanding away on the body- it had been repainted-during spring term at the U of O, when not studying...

So, the first picture is of Mike the painter, with the freshly painted wagon.   Our process consisted of Mike running the gun, while I picked the needles that fell off the trees out of the paint.   Mike had to wait every 30 seconds or so for the tired old compressor to have enough air to atomize the paint.   We both thought it looked pretty good.   Had to get it done before the wind came up, summertime at the coast and all.

After college, I got my first job in Corvallis.  The engine was tired again, and I searched for a replacement engine.  In Eugene, in  the pennysaver- or similar- the ad papers that existed before Craigslist-had an ad for a homemade tractor with a jeep engine.  $75 later I had another Fhead 4.   Block was good!  Had it overhauled by a machine shop in Corvallis.   I took the 3 speed transmission apart, and put in replacement "stuff".  It somehow still worked when I was done.   Also in Corvallis, had the kingpins replaced, so steering would work better, and, before embarking on a big trip, had the valves done at a shop in Corvallis, the owner had been a Studebaker dealer.  Which meant he had a speedometer gear for the transmission, the Studebakers used the same one.  And, in those days, there was a speedometer shop in Corvallis that could make the other end of the system work.  So, for the first time, there was a somewhat accurate speedometer.   Who knows how many miles ther are on the wagon, since there were no miles recorded for many years. 

The big trip happened in 1981.   I was lucky enough to be getting married, and the now long suffering woman hailed from Connecticut.  Decided to drive the wagon there; I figured it might be the last chance before we ran out of gasoline.  Expensive, too, at $1.35.  The second picture is from that trip.

John mentioned the Willystech list.  There used to be discussions about Willyspoints- how to talk your spouse into money and time for the jeep.   If you have a picture like this (3rd one), no problem!

On the trip, the wagon was not running well when we got to Toronto, so I took it to an AMC dealer for a look.  I looked around the corner,  and I had every mechanic they had looking at it.  We made it to Trumbull, CT, met the family-not a blonde in sight, Italians....and headed back via a southern route.  Managed to go low on transmission oil and fry the overdrive; it was overhauled by a good shop in Mississippi.  Worked our way west, visited my grandmothers in LA, and limped home with a burnt exhaust valve. 

Moved to Eugene, after a year in San Francisco getting another degree.  The Willys was gradually sinking into the back yard.  Two little girls, not much time for a car project.  I did build the Bolger Cartopper in the 90's, and it got me thinking about the rusty old wagon.  By now, it was hardly running, rust all over, no fuel to the engine, no power when it ran, oil leaks, etc.  I thought, with what I'd learned from building a boat with epoxy, maybe I could repair the rust with glass and resin!   About that time, my old friend John got back in touch with me; he offered to go through the engine.   He knew a lot more.  He mentioned that,  in the old days, as long as a camshaft had bumps, OK.  During this next overhaul,  welding and grinding the camshaft greatly improved the engine.

So, now there's rusty wagon with an overhauled engine ready to go back in.  I got a book about restoring cars; epoxy was in the "absolutely not" category.  So, I began the search for the "perfect body".  No, or minimal, Internet then.  I got a tip somehow that there were Willys in Virginia City, NV; I had a business trip to Las Vegas, so I drove down the family wagon to see what I could find.  Another digression-by 1953, most wagons sold were 4 wheel drive- only 235 2  wheel wagons were made.  The bodies are different, firewall and floor in particular.  I had to be flexible.  In Virginia City, I arrived on a Sunday morning, walked around looking for things, and found a 1956 4WD wagon, with many parts missing, behind a steel shop building.  A guy, driving a flatfender jeep arrived- his shop was for motorcycles- he was finishing up an Indian.  Anyway, the body was much less rusty than mine, and $300 bought the wreck.  I managed to tow it back to Eugene, after other fiascos, and started taking things apart. 

The restoration took 8 years and about $8000.  It was the "surviving teenage girls" restoration.  Frame off, installation of reproduction panels, moving metal from the old body to new, replacement of every piece of rubber, complete rewiring, etc.  The 4th picture is of bodywork on the rear, rust and dent repair galore.   Lots of welding.  Finished, pretty much, by 2000.

The last picture includes towing the Pelican sailboat.   The wagon runs well, after fighting with a few nagging details over the years.    With a following breeze, it gets decent fuel economy.  Much happier on secondary roads than freeways.   It's a great combination of slow, unsafe and noisy.  But, people love to see it out, and I enjoy driving the time machine around once and a while.

Dan


<First paint Mike N001.jpg>
<Willys002.jpg>
<Dan and Pamela003.jpg>
<in progress004.jpg>
<IMG_0049.jpg>


Stephen Miller
 

Thanks for telling us the  story!

Steve Miller

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 6:26 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
Alright,  remember, your asked!  

I was interested in the Willys wagons because my father/family had one when I was young, a 1949.  I remember standing up in the backseat while my mother had a friend teach her how to drive (on Munsel Lake road).  It was a 2 wheel drive model, with the WW2 flathead 4 for power. 

When I was 19, (1972) I saw one on hwy 126, close to Noti, on the side of the road.  A 1953, $200.  What a steal!   Cleared the blackberry vines out of it,  and drove it to Eugene.    A 1953 differs from a 1949 in the front grill and fenders, which got more chrome, and the engine was "hopped up" with a F head configuration- which added an overhead valve setup on the intake side, but kept the exhaust valves in the block.  A Florence friend John wanted to go to Olympia to pick up an engine for his truck, so off we went.  I quart oil per 60 miles.  John, being an aspiring mechanic, helped me do a "shade tree" overhaul.  There was a crack in the block, but it stopped just before piston travel, so who cares.  Anyway, that helped a lot and it ran OK for a few years.   Another friend in Florence had a father with a compressor and spray gun.  I'd been sanding away on the body- it had been repainted-during spring term at the U of O, when not studying...

So, the first picture is of Mike the painter, with the freshly painted wagon.   Our process consisted of Mike running the gun, while I picked the needles that fell off the trees out of the paint.   Mike had to wait every 30 seconds or so for the tired old compressor to have enough air to atomize the paint.   We both thought it looked pretty good.   Had to get it done before the wind came up, summertime at the coast and all.

After college, I got my first job in Corvallis.  The engine was tired again, and I searched for a replacement engine.  In Eugene, in  the pennysaver- or similar- the ad papers that existed before Craigslist-had an ad for a homemade tractor with a jeep engine.  $75 later I had another Fhead 4.   Block was good!  Had it overhauled by a machine shop in Corvallis.   I took the 3 speed transmission apart, and put in replacement "stuff".  It somehow still worked when I was done.   Also in Corvallis, had the kingpins replaced, so steering would work better, and, before embarking on a big trip, had the valves done at a shop in Corvallis, the owner had been a Studebaker dealer.  Which meant he had a speedometer gear for the transmission, the Studebakers used the same one.  And, in those days, there was a speedometer shop in Corvallis that could make the other end of the system work.  So, for the first time, there was a somewhat accurate speedometer.   Who knows how many miles ther are on the wagon, since there were no miles recorded for many years. 

The big trip happened in 1981.   I was lucky enough to be getting married, and the now long suffering woman hailed from Connecticut.  Decided to drive the wagon there; I figured it might be the last chance before we ran out of gasoline.  Expensive, too, at $1.35.  The second picture is from that trip.

John mentioned the Willystech list.  There used to be discussions about Willyspoints- how to talk your spouse into money and time for the jeep.   If you have a picture like this (3rd one), no problem!

On the trip, the wagon was not running well when we got to Toronto, so I took it to an AMC dealer for a look.  I looked around the corner,  and I had every mechanic they had looking at it.  We made it to Trumbull, CT, met the family-not a blonde in sight, Italians....and headed back via a southern route.  Managed to go low on transmission oil and fry the overdrive; it was overhauled by a good shop in Mississippi.  Worked our way west, visited my grandmothers in LA, and limped home with a burnt exhaust valve. 

Moved to Eugene, after a year in San Francisco getting another degree.  The Willys was gradually sinking into the back yard.  Two little girls, not much time for a car project.  I did build the Bolger Cartopper in the 90's, and it got me thinking about the rusty old wagon.  By now, it was hardly running, rust all over, no fuel to the engine, no power when it ran, oil leaks, etc.  I thought, with what I'd learned from building a boat with epoxy, maybe I could repair the rust with glass and resin!   About that time, my old friend John got back in touch with me; he offered to go through the engine.   He knew a lot more.  He mentioned that,  in the old days, as long as a camshaft had bumps, OK.  During this next overhaul,  welding and grinding the camshaft greatly improved the engine.

So, now there's rusty wagon with an overhauled engine ready to go back in.  I got a book about restoring cars; epoxy was in the "absolutely not" category.  So, I began the search for the "perfect body".  No, or minimal, Internet then.  I got a tip somehow that there were Willys in Virginia City, NV; I had a business trip to Las Vegas, so I drove down the family wagon to see what I could find.  Another digression-by 1953, most wagons sold were 4 wheel drive- only 235 2  wheel wagons were made.  The bodies are different, firewall and floor in particular.  I had to be flexible.  In Virginia City, I arrived on a Sunday morning, walked around looking for things, and found a 1956 4WD wagon, with many parts missing, behind a steel shop building.  A guy, driving a flatfender jeep arrived- his shop was for motorcycles- he was finishing up an Indian.  Anyway, the body was much less rusty than mine, and $300 bought the wreck.  I managed to tow it back to Eugene, after other fiascos, and started taking things apart. 

The restoration took 8 years and about $8000.  It was the "surviving teenage girls" restoration.  Frame off, installation of reproduction panels, moving metal from the old body to new, replacement of every piece of rubber, complete rewiring, etc.  The 4th picture is of bodywork on the rear, rust and dent repair galore.   Lots of welding.  Finished, pretty much, by 2000.

The last picture includes towing the Pelican sailboat.   The wagon runs well, after fighting with a few nagging details over the years.    With a following breeze, it gets decent fuel economy.  Much happier on secondary roads than freeways.   It's a great combination of slow, unsafe and noisy.  But, people love to see it out, and I enjoy driving the time machine around once and a while.

Dan



Case Turner
 

John,

I jought this group was a Messabout group.

Which encompasses lots of different Messaging abouts.

As you say this fits right in with the coots. Shouldn’t be limited to boats,

No rules no flaming!

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 12, 2021, at 3:12 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

For once I agree with Case. A lot of Ol's Coots are gearheads who like old iron, boaty or not. I won't punish you too badly for posting something without boats in it, Dan. Maybe you could post a picture of the Willys towing a boat. ;o)

On 2/12/2021 11:45 AM, Case wrote:
I say post it here. I’d like to hear more about it too.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
At sea a fellow comes out. Salt water is like wine, in that respect. (Herman Melville)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com





--
Dirt


Richard Green
 

Good story, lots of fun that YOU were doing it.  Heh.  When I was a kid we had a ’52 Jeep “woody” wagon and I remember camping trips we took in it.  We even went to Triangle Lake back then from Albany.

Rich

On Feb 12, 2021, at 9:08 PM, Stephen Miller <w7srmsteve@...> wrote:

Thanks for telling us the  story!

Steve Miller

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 6:26 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
Alright,  remember, your asked!  

I was interested in the Willys wagons because my father/family had one when I was young, a 1949.  I remember standing up in the backseat while my mother had a friend teach her how to drive (on Munsel Lake road).  It was a 2 wheel drive model, with the WW2 flathead 4 for power. 

When I was 19, (1972) I saw one on hwy 126, close to Noti, on the side of the road.  A 1953, $200.  What a steal!   Cleared the blackberry vines out of it,  and drove it to Eugene.    A 1953 differs from a 1949 in the front grill and fenders, which got more chrome, and the engine was "hopped up" with a F head configuration- which added an overhead valve setup on the intake side, but kept the exhaust valves in the block.  A Florence friend John wanted to go to Olympia to pick up an engine for his truck, so off we went.  I quart oil per 60 miles.  John, being an aspiring mechanic, helped me do a "shade tree" overhaul.  There was a crack in the block, but it stopped just before piston travel, so who cares.  Anyway, that helped a lot and it ran OK for a few years.   Another friend in Florence had a father with a compressor and spray gun.  I'd been sanding away on the body- it had been repainted-during spring term at the U of O, when not studying...

So, the first picture is of Mike the painter, with the freshly painted wagon.   Our process consisted of Mike running the gun, while I picked the needles that fell off the trees out of the paint.   Mike had to wait every 30 seconds or so for the tired old compressor to have enough air to atomize the paint.   We both thought it looked pretty good.   Had to get it done before the wind came up, summertime at the coast and all.

After college, I got my first job in Corvallis.  The engine was tired again, and I searched for a replacement engine.  In Eugene, in  the pennysaver- or similar- the ad papers that existed before Craigslist-had an ad for a homemade tractor with a jeep engine.  $75 later I had another Fhead 4.   Block was good!  Had it overhauled by a machine shop in Corvallis.   I took the 3 speed transmission apart, and put in replacement "stuff".  It somehow still worked when I was done.   Also in Corvallis, had the kingpins replaced, so steering would work better, and, before embarking on a big trip, had the valves done at a shop in Corvallis, the owner had been a Studebaker dealer.  Which meant he had a speedometer gear for the transmission, the Studebakers used the same one.  And, in those days, there was a speedometer shop in Corvallis that could make the other end of the system work.  So, for the first time, there was a somewhat accurate speedometer.   Who knows how many miles ther are on the wagon, since there were no miles recorded for many years. 

The big trip happened in 1981.   I was lucky enough to be getting married, and the now long suffering woman hailed from Connecticut.  Decided to drive the wagon there; I figured it might be the last chance before we ran out of gasoline.  Expensive, too, at $1.35.  The second picture is from that trip.

John mentioned the Willystech list.  There used to be discussions about Willyspoints- how to talk your spouse into money and time for the jeep.   If you have a picture like this (3rd one), no problem!

On the trip, the wagon was not running well when we got to Toronto, so I took it to an AMC dealer for a look.  I looked around the corner,  and I had every mechanic they had looking at it.  We made it to Trumbull, CT, met the family-not a blonde in sight, Italians....and headed back via a southern route.  Managed to go low on transmission oil and fry the overdrive; it was overhauled by a good shop in Mississippi.  Worked our way west, visited my grandmothers in LA, and limped home with a burnt exhaust valve. 

Moved to Eugene, after a year in San Francisco getting another degree.  The Willys was gradually sinking into the back yard.  Two little girls, not much time for a car project.  I did build the Bolger Cartopper in the 90's, and it got me thinking about the rusty old wagon.  By now, it was hardly running, rust all over, no fuel to the engine, no power when it ran, oil leaks, etc.  I thought, with what I'd learned from building a boat with epoxy, maybe I could repair the rust with glass and resin!   About that time, my old friend John got back in touch with me; he offered to go through the engine.   He knew a lot more.  He mentioned that,  in the old days, as long as a camshaft had bumps, OK.  During this next overhaul,  welding and grinding the camshaft greatly improved the engine.

So, now there's rusty wagon with an overhauled engine ready to go back in.  I got a book about restoring cars; epoxy was in the "absolutely not" category.  So, I began the search for the "perfect body".  No, or minimal, Internet then.  I got a tip somehow that there were Willys in Virginia City, NV; I had a business trip to Las Vegas, so I drove down the family wagon to see what I could find.  Another digression-by 1953, most wagons sold were 4 wheel drive- only 235 2  wheel wagons were made.  The bodies are different, firewall and floor in particular.  I had to be flexible.  In Virginia City, I arrived on a Sunday morning, walked around looking for things, and found a 1956 4WD wagon, with many parts missing, behind a steel shop building.  A guy, driving a flatfender jeep arrived- his shop was for motorcycles- he was finishing up an Indian.  Anyway, the body was much less rusty than mine, and $300 bought the wreck.  I managed to tow it back to Eugene, after other fiascos, and started taking things apart. 

The restoration took 8 years and about $8000.  It was the "surviving teenage girls" restoration.  Frame off, installation of reproduction panels, moving metal from the old body to new, replacement of every piece of rubber, complete rewiring, etc.  The 4th picture is of bodywork on the rear, rust and dent repair galore.   Lots of welding.  Finished, pretty much, by 2000.

The last picture includes towing the Pelican sailboat.   The wagon runs well, after fighting with a few nagging details over the years.    With a following breeze, it gets decent fuel economy.  Much happier on secondary roads than freeways.   It's a great combination of slow, unsafe and noisy.  But, people love to see it out, and I enjoy driving the time machine around once and a while.

Dan






johnacord
 

Dan,

Great story and narrative. I enjoyed reading and seeing the pictures of your Willys.

Like you my youth was spent 'messing about' in old cars.  Mine was a Ford Model A, circa 1929.  Started with a coupe but wanted a roadster, so took the coupe body off, rebuilt everything and put a roadster body on.  Fords of that era had mechanical brakes which left a lot to be desired, but had a separate parking brake band on the back, so for panic stops one used the parking brake lever for added braking!

When I was 18 I took that roadster from Southern California to eastern B.C. and back via Yellowstone for a camping trip and pulling a trailer.  Was glad for the 'parking brake assisted stops'.  The roadster had side curtains for windows so in Yellowstone the bears were an issue.  But in forethought I had put an opening in the exhaust ahead of the muffler closed off with a cap easily removed. That and the Model A having a mechanical spark advance on the distributor if you revved the engine and retarded the spark it would backfire.  No bear trouble :-)

John Acord


 

Dan was pulling our legs, Case. He knows an old gearhead like me would never slap him with a fish for posting about his old Willys. ;o)

We're a group of friend here, so conversations about anything interesting are welcome, but we should try to come back to talking about boats now and then. <g>

I think it might have started back on the USENET rec.boats group -- at the end of posting something "off topic" you'd add some "obligatory nautical content", like Dan's picture of the Willys towing his Pelican. How about a boat repairman's old Dodge?

https://flic.kr/p/dKCi8A

The one I had was probably a little older. Cost me $5 because the PO couldn't keep the battery charged -- he'd put it in backwards! (Everybody but GM, and a few other oddballs, used positive ground in 1940). Burned oil by the gallon.

The Coot motto was first used for a motorcycle rally -- the Dallas to Oceanside British & European Motorcycle Run.

No Fees - No Prizes - No Rules

So don't expect me to get too upset over posts about non-nautical old iron. :o)

On 2/12/2021 9:27 PM, Case wrote:
John,
I jought this group was a Messabout group.
Which encompasses lots of different Messaging abouts.
As you say this fits right in with the coots. Shouldn’t be limited to boats,
No rules no flaming!
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I can't take a well-tanned person seriously. (Cleveland Amory)
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dan mulholland
 

There appear to be limits on the number of attachments, so here are more that were to be with the original post.  The first is "willys points"; the second shows a portion of the bodywork, which looks good from about 25'.   If the third picture makes it, shows the wagon with the Pelican attached.

Dan


cherrill boissonou
 

What if when we were teens in the 50’s we hot-Rodded boats instead of cars....
.....NICE RAKE,!....Yeah, I added 50lbs to the bow and shaved 40lbs off the stern. COOL
MOTOR.....yowza....ripped off the evinrude cranker and mounted merc flatty top a’ the shaft housing...then a 19/40 seven blade prop....then..............
Earl Boissonou

On Feb 13, 2021, at 4:44 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

There appear to be limits on the number of attachments, so here are more that were to be with the original post.  The first is "willys points"; the second shows a portion of the bodywork, which looks good from about 25'.   If the third picture makes it, shows the wagon with the Pelican attached.

Dan

<Wedding trip 1 Oregon009.jpg>
<in progress004.jpg>
<IMG_0049.jpg>


 

I don't know if there's a limit on attachments, but you didn't reach it, Dan. I got to see them all when you first posted them. You're email program may be set up so _it_ limits the amount of data it automatically downloads. There's probably a way to "download entire message", or something like that...

On 2/13/2021 4:44 PM, Dan M wrote:
There appear to be limits on the number of attachments, so here are more that were to be with the original post.  The first is "willys points"; the second shows a portion of the bodywork, which looks good from about 25'.   If the third picture makes it, shows the wagon with the Pelican attached.
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Literally no man has more wholly outlived life than I. And still it's good fun. (Robert Louis Stevenson)
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