Topics

Table Saw Blues --- Burnt out motor !!


Electri-Cal
 

Just had my Delta 10 inch saw burn out, this is not good.  Looking to replace that is pretty spendy.  So, looking for a good motor rebuilder, a replacement, or exchange motor, maybe even a different gently used saw to replace my old one.  Ideas welcome, I found a motor rebuilder down the road, but different tried and successful ideas might come from the Coots, so here goes !!  Yep, it'll cost a few bucks, but would like to do it some good way to get rolling again.  

Thanks,   Cal


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Motors on stationary power tools are usually interchangeable. What is the power rating on the motor?
The cheap table saw off craigslist is often the cheapest way to get a new motor. They are so cumbersome that people put a low price on them to free up space. 
https://eugene.craigslist.org/tls/d/springfield-10-inch-sears-tablesaw/7180024010.html  
Are you happy with your saw in general? or would you consider replacing it? I think my neighbor is looking at getting rid of a small table saw at some point, I could ask him the price.
I'm in south eugene. Where are you?
Also, harbor freight has motors in box for ~160. I'm not sure what you're prefered budget is. Is this a "I want to fix it for under $20" type of thing?
I'm interested to hear what others say, I've burnt out a couple motors and it's always been a pain to find a good cheap replacement.
-Jove


On Wed, Aug 19, 2020 at 5:37 PM Electri-Cal <calboats@...> wrote:
Just had my Delta 10 inch saw burn out, this is not good.  Looking to replace that is pretty spendy.  So, looking for a good motor rebuilder, a replacement, or exchange motor, maybe even a different gently used saw to replace my old one.  Ideas welcome, I found a motor rebuilder down the road, but different tried and successful ideas might come from the Coots, so here goes !!  Yep, it'll cost a few bucks, but would like to do it some good way to get rolling again.  

Thanks,   Cal


 

Cal's saw has the blade bolted right to the motor shaft, and a brushed AC/DC motor. Like a great big portable circular saw bolted to the underside of the table. Not a separate motor with a belt to the arbor like the pricier saws. He was talking about it the other day. My going-on-50-year-old Sears saw has that integral motor and arbor and is still humming along (though brushed motors make more noise). It's kinda scary that I remember when my saw was bought new, by a friend. <g>

You can often find good deals on old table saws. If it's a good make and model, a little fettling and maybe a new fence and you can have got a good saw.

On 8/20/2020 1:54 PM, Jove wrote:
Motors on stationary power tools are usually interchangeable. What is the power rating on the motor?

The cheap table saw off craigslist is often the cheapest way to get a new motor. They are so cumbersome that people put a low price on them to free up space.
https://eugene.craigslist.org/tls/d/springfield-10-inch-sears-tablesaw/7180024010.html ...
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Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

Don't be like me, Cal. I had a cheepie Craftsman table saw that I got on sale for $ 99.00 & in 3 or 4 years burnt the motor out. I got all the numbers & gave them to my wife & had her order a motor from Craftsman. When it got here the bill was $ 102.00. Jim


Case Turner
 

When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws. 

I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc. 

Really like all of them. 

Case

Sent from not here

On Sep 2, 2020, at 6:54 PM, Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany@...> wrote:

Don't be like me, Cal. I had a cheepie Craftsman table saw that I got on sale for $ 99.00 & in 3 or 4 years burnt the motor out. I got all the numbers & gave them to my wife & had her order a motor from Craftsman. When it got here the bill was $ 102.00. Jim

--
Dirt


 

I had no idea useful battery table saws existed:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3ntfrkr

But I'm lucky enough to have a place to plug in a saw.

I sure do love cordless drills and impact drivers, though. :o) Chuck the Duck told me that there was no reason to get anything bigger than the 12 volt (nominal) ones, and he was right. Plenty of power and handier than the bigger ones. I think the big ones are marketed towards the same sort of men who drive huge pickups and put great big motors on their boats. <g> Chuck was also right that once I tried on of the impact drivers I'd fall in love with it. ;o) I went with a Makita set, and haven't been sorry. The same batteries power my mini-vac and a little bitty circular saw.

On 9/2/2020 7:43 PM, Case wrote:
When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws.
I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc.
Really like all of them.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I'll believe anything, no matter how wild and ridiculous, if there is evidence for it. The wilder and more ridiculous something is, however, the firmer and more solid the evidence will have to be. (Isaac Asimov)
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Case Turner
 

I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.

This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.

All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.

As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.

When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!

Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.

Case

Sent from not here

On Sep 3, 2020, at 2:07 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

I had no idea useful battery table saws existed:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3ntfrkr

But I'm lucky enough to have a place to plug in a saw.

I sure do love cordless drills and impact drivers, though. :o) Chuck the Duck told me that there was no reason to get anything bigger than the 12 volt (nominal) ones, and he was right. Plenty of power and handier than the bigger ones. I think the big ones are marketed towards the same sort of men who drive huge pickups and put great big motors on their boats. <g> Chuck was also right that once I tried on of the impact drivers I'd fall in love with it. ;o) I went with a Makita set, and haven't been sorry. The same batteries power my mini-vac and a little bitty circular saw.

On 9/2/2020 7:43 PM, Case wrote:
When we sold our last house that had a shop I sold all my big floor saws.
I now have all Deealt battery operated gear. Chop saw, table saw, drills, etc.
Really like all of them.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I'll believe anything, no matter how wild and ridiculous, if there is evidence for it. The wilder and more ridiculous something is, however, the firmer and more solid the evidence will have to be. (Isaac Asimov)


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Dirt


 

You've got the experience to back up your recommendation for the higher voltage portable drills and drivers for working hard all day, Case, but Chuck the Duck was right about the little ones for us amateur boatbuiders and fiddlers. The 12 volt drills and drivers aren't just more bang for the buck, they're smaller and less clumsy. Better for working in tight places, and handier all around.

Where more battery power would be useful is for a battery portable circular saw. I'm sure all of us would love a circular saw that didn't have a cord to drag around (and cut <g>) and the power to zip through 2x4s. The little 12 volt trim saw I've got really isn't much good for anything except cutting trim and thin plywood. Alas, I've got two good corded circular saws, and a Bosch jigsaw. <sigh> <g>

An electric chainsaw is sure great! I seldom use a chainsaw, so I ditched the last gas one and bought a corded electric saw. No worrying about whether it will start after sitting for months, no having to keep 2-stroke mix on hand, a LOT less noise. :o) That was years ago; I might buy a battery chainsaw if I needed to today. This year I gave up on the gas weedeater and got a battery weed whacker. It's a cheapo Black & Decker (parent company of Dewalt!) but I don't use it often, so I hope it'll be OK. Works great so far, and the battery lasts longer than I want to run it.

Battery powered tools have sure come a long way in recent years! :o)

On 9/3/2020 2:25 PM, Case wrote:
I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.
This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.
All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.
> As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best
bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.
When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!
Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The cabin of a small yacht is truly a wonderful thing; not only will it shelter you from a tempest, but from the other troubles in life, it is a safe retreat. (L. Francis Herreshoff)


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Case Turner
 

Well along the lines of the circular saw, I have a 20v Dewalt. Not the first I’ve owned. Had the makita, and a Milwaukee.

Cuts wood all day long. No cord in the way and weighs nothing.

Gave all my makita stuff to my youngest son Braxton that most had met. He’s cutting, drilling and screwing (no dirty minds allowed) everything he can!

Case

Sent from not here

On Sep 3, 2020, at 7:56 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

You've got the experience to back up your recommendation for the higher voltage portable drills and drivers for working hard all day, Case, but Chuck the Duck was right about the little ones for us amateur boatbuiders and fiddlers. The 12 volt drills and drivers aren't just more bang for the buck, they're smaller and less clumsy. Better for working in tight places, and handier all around.

Where more battery power would be useful is for a battery portable circular saw. I'm sure all of us would love a circular saw that didn't have a cord to drag around (and cut <g>) and the power to zip through 2x4s. The little 12 volt trim saw I've got really isn't much good for anything except cutting trim and thin plywood. Alas, I've got two good corded circular saws, and a Bosch jigsaw. <sigh> <g>

An electric chainsaw is sure great! I seldom use a chainsaw, so I ditched the last gas one and bought a corded electric saw. No worrying about whether it will start after sitting for months, no having to keep 2-stroke mix on hand, a LOT less noise. :o) That was years ago; I might buy a battery chainsaw if I needed to today. This year I gave up on the gas weedeater and got a battery weed whacker. It's a cheapo Black & Decker (parent company of Dewalt!) but I don't use it often, so I hope it'll be OK. Works great so far, and the battery lasts longer than I want to run it.

Battery powered tools have sure come a long way in recent years! :o)

On 9/3/2020 2:25 PM, Case wrote:
I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.
This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.
All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.
As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best
bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.
When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!
Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The cabin of a small yacht is truly a wonderful thing; not only will it shelter you from a tempest, but from the other troubles in life, it is a safe retreat. (L. Francis Herreshoff)


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Dirt


Richard Green
 

Re electric weed whackers. I have a Stihl corded weedwhacker I’m letting go of as I have hired a landscape guy, the lower back doesn’t like yard work of any sort. I had a battery operated small mower, 19” deck”, which did my lawn on half a battery and my ex is happy with it now. Anyway, if anyone is interested in it, the price is right. Very low hours as my needs were small to begin with.

Rich

On Sep 3, 2020, at 7:56 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

You've got the experience to back up your recommendation for the higher voltage portable drills and drivers for working hard all day, Case, but Chuck the Duck was right about the little ones for us amateur boatbuiders and fiddlers. The 12 volt drills and drivers aren't just more bang for the buck, they're smaller and less clumsy. Better for working in tight places, and handier all around.

Where more battery power would be useful is for a battery portable circular saw. I'm sure all of us would love a circular saw that didn't have a cord to drag around (and cut <g>) and the power to zip through 2x4s. The little 12 volt trim saw I've got really isn't much good for anything except cutting trim and thin plywood. Alas, I've got two good corded circular saws, and a Bosch jigsaw. <sigh> <g>

An electric chainsaw is sure great! I seldom use a chainsaw, so I ditched the last gas one and bought a corded electric saw. No worrying about whether it will start after sitting for months, no having to keep 2-stroke mix on hand, a LOT less noise. :o) That was years ago; I might buy a battery chainsaw if I needed to today. This year I gave up on the gas weedeater and got a battery weed whacker. It's a cheapo Black & Decker (parent company of Dewalt!) but I don't use it often, so I hope it'll be OK. Works great so far, and the battery lasts longer than I want to run it.

Battery powered tools have sure come a long way in recent years! :o)

On 9/3/2020 2:25 PM, Case wrote:
I had all Makita for a long time. The only reason I went with desalt was because of the table saw and chop saw. Both of which are plenty for the type of stuff we all do. If I was still doing finish carpentry for a living I’d use these in a heart beat.
This past year I rounded out my battery operated equipment with desalts weed eater, leaf blower, and 16” chainsaw. These all use the same batteries as the table and chop saws.
All of which I’ve been throughly impressed with. When I’m exploring back roads or camping the chain saw is always me. There was a ton of blow down last winter and without it we would’ve not got far many trips.
As for the 12v being enough, for occasional users they are the best
bang for the buck. If you’re running them all day long though GH the 20v is a must.
When I was in Hawaii working I was loaned a 12v Makita set to use. Didn’t cut it. I was changing batteries three times as much as the guys with 20v. So I bought the 20v drill and impact set. Mailed back the drill set, a hammer, a tape and a tool belt. Only souvenirs I brought back, lol!
Anyways the Dewalt battery tools are the real deal and I’d have no problem using them if I was still building.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The cabin of a small yacht is truly a wonderful thing; not only will it shelter you from a tempest, but from the other troubles in life, it is a safe retreat. (L. Francis Herreshoff)


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