Topics

Something boat related this time!


Andrew Linn
 

I'm teaching a friend from work to build Skin-on-Frame canoes. We finished one last month and tested it at Cascade Gateway Park
http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Nicely done Andrew,
I must say I would never paint my boat that color. Unless I was going to grass it up for duck hunting. But it looks build for paddling which is the point, so who cares what color it is.
What were the overall dimensions?
-Jove

On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 8:45 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
I'm teaching a friend from work to build Skin-on-Frame canoes. We
finished one last month and tested it at Cascade Gateway Park
http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm






Andrew Linn
 

That's the previous version of my "Willamette" design. 15.5" loa and 31" max beam.  I have since reworked the design and am pretty pleased.

I've figured out how to make an "extendable" SoF design. With one set of frames, you can make 3 different length boats: an 11.5' Yaquina for solo paddling, a 15.5' Willamette for tandem, and an 18.5' Columbia for a . . .  tandem plus? All the frames fit inside a 32x48 piece of ply, so you can get 3 boats out of one sheet of 1/2" plywood. The boats are designed for flat, calm waters and pleasure paddling.

There is a Columbia under construction in Virginia and I'll be building a couple Willamettes and a Yaquina over the winter.

As for the color: The guy I am teaching wanted to treat the timbers, even though I told him it is unnecessary, he was adamant. We work in a building supply store, so I showed him hte Rustoleum paints and told him to pick a color, or even two colors, one for the frame and one for the skin. He dithered so long I got bored and said "Fine, we'll paint the frame black, it goes with everything.

Once the frame was painted, we skinned the boat. He simply was unable to choose a color, and I had some black left over, so . . .

I gotta say, I like it. Like, I really like it.

On 11/16/2020 10:07 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Nicely done Andrew,
I must say I would never paint my boat that color. Unless I was going to grass it up for duck hunting. But it looks build for paddling which is the point, so who cares what color it is.
What were the overall dimensions?
-Jove

On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 8:45 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@andrewlinn.com <mailto:alinn@andrewlinn.com>> wrote:

I'm teaching a friend from work to build Skin-on-Frame canoes. We
finished one last month and tested it at Cascade Gateway Park
http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm
<http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm>;


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Very cool, thanks Andrew,
I'm impressed you can get so many out of a sheet of ply!
-Jove

On Tue, Nov 17, 2020 at 6:13 AM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
That's the previous version of my "Willamette" design. 15.5" loa and 31"
max beam.  I have since reworked the design and am pretty pleased.

I've figured out how to make an "extendable" SoF design. With one set of
frames, you can make 3 different length boats: an 11.5' Yaquina for solo
paddling, a 15.5' Willamette for tandem, and an 18.5' Columbia for a . .
.  tandem plus? All the frames fit inside a 32x48 piece of ply, so you
can get 3 boats out of one sheet of 1/2" plywood. The boats are designed
for flat, calm waters and pleasure paddling.

There is a Columbia under construction in Virginia and I'll be building
a couple Willamettes and a Yaquina over the winter.

As for the color: The guy I am teaching wanted to treat the timbers,
even though I told him it is unnecessary, he was adamant. We work in a
building supply store, so I showed him hte Rustoleum paints and told him
to pick a color, or even two colors, one for the frame and one for the
skin. He dithered so long I got bored and said "Fine, we'll paint the
frame black, it goes with everything.

Once the frame was painted, we skinned the boat. He simply was unable to
choose a color, and I had some black left over, so . . .

I gotta say, I like it. Like, I really like it.

On 11/16/2020 10:07 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
> Nicely done Andrew,
> I must say I would never paint my boat that color. Unless I was going
> to grass it up for duck hunting. But it looks build for paddling which
> is the point, so who cares what color it is.
> What were the overall dimensions?
> -Jove
>
> On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 8:45 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...
> <mailto:alinn@...>> wrote:
>
>     I'm teaching a friend from work to build Skin-on-Frame canoes. We
>     finished one last month and tested it at Cascade Gateway Park
>     http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm
>     <http://andrewlinn.com/2020/211002_wirth/index.htm>
>







 

The new canoe looks good. You built it to the old plan, but thought up the stretchable design while you were building it?

At any rate, can we see some more pictures of of it being built. Some of pout newer Coots aren't as familiar with the Gentry style of building as you and I are.

On 11/17/2020 6:13 AM, Andrew wrote:
That's the previous version of my "Willamette" design. 15.5" loa and 31" max beam.  I have since reworked the design and am pretty pleased.
I've figured out how to make an "extendable" SoF design. With one set of frames, you can make 3 different length boats: an 11.5' Yaquina for solo paddling, a 15.5' Willamette for tandem, and an 18.5' Columbia for a . . .  tandem plus? All the frames fit inside a 32x48 piece of ply, so you can get 3 boats out of one sheet of 1/2" plywood. The boats are designed for flat, calm waters and pleasure paddling.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Curiosity is insubordination in its purest form. (Vladimir Nabokov)
--
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https://www.avg.com


Andrew Linn
 

Here's a essay to get started. I'll do a good job of documenting my next build
http://andrewlinn.com/2019/190824_igo/index.htm

On 11/17/2020 10:20 AM, John Kohnen wrote:
The new canoe looks good. You built it to the old plan, but thought up the stretchable design while you were building it?

At any rate, can we see some more pictures of of it being built. Some of pout newer Coots aren't as familiar with the Gentry style of building as you and I are.

On 11/17/2020 6:13 AM, Andrew wrote:
That's the previous version of my "Willamette" design. 15.5" loa and 31" max beam.  I have since reworked the design and am pretty pleased.

I've figured out how to make an "extendable" SoF design. With one set of frames, you can make 3 different length boats: an 11.5' Yaquina for solo paddling, a 15.5' Willamette for tandem, and an 18.5' Columbia for a . . .  tandem plus? All the frames fit inside a 32x48 piece of ply, so you can get 3 boats out of one sheet of 1/2" plywood. The boats are designed for flat, calm waters and pleasure paddling.
...


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Really nice Andrew,
I like that you're using scrap wood to make something so beautiful and useful.
I'm going to call you and pick your brain when I get around to my next SOF.
-Jove


On Tue, Nov 17, 2020 at 2:54 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
Here's a essay to get started. I'll do a good job of documenting my next
build
http://andrewlinn.com/2019/190824_igo/index.htm


On 11/17/2020 10:20 AM, John Kohnen wrote:
> The new canoe looks good. You built it to the old plan, but thought up
> the stretchable design while you were building it?
>
> At any rate, can we see some more pictures of of it being built. Some
> of pout newer Coots aren't as familiar with the Gentry style of
> building as you and I are.
>
> On 11/17/2020 6:13 AM, Andrew wrote:
>> That's the previous version of my "Willamette" design. 15.5" loa and
>> 31" max beam.  I have since reworked the design and am pretty pleased.
>>
>> I've figured out how to make an "extendable" SoF design. With one set
>> of frames, you can make 3 different length boats: an 11.5' Yaquina
>> for solo paddling, a 15.5' Willamette for tandem, and an 18.5'
>> Columbia for a . . .  tandem plus? All the frames fit inside a 32x48
>> piece of ply, so you can get 3 boats out of one sheet of 1/2"
>> plywood. The boats are designed for flat, calm waters and pleasure
>> paddling.
>> ...
>







 

Thanks, Andy. A good photo essay. Regarding the 1,000 staples and the patches:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001144X3E/themotherofal-20

Platt Monfort used HeatnBond on his Geodesic Airolite boats to hold the skin on, and for patches. I don't know that I'd trust it in the long term without something like a rubrail over it. It's supposed to be very strong in shear, but weak resisting peel.

Building boats the Dave Gentry way (not his invention, he just likes it and has done a lot to promote it) is quick, cheap, relatively easy, and fun. It's kinda relaxing. :o) You're never caught with a batch of epoxy going off before you're done worth it. The lashing is kinda tedious, but you can stop any time you want. When you come back and see that you did something wrong, you just pull out your pocketknife and do it over. :o) I've helped on several of the Toledo Boathouse builds, but have never done a whole build myself:

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

A book about the general method:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1480007609/themotherofal-20

On 11/17/2020 2:54 PM, Andrew wrote:
Here's a essay to get started. I'll do a good job of documenting my next build
http://andrewlinn.com/2019/190824_igo/index.htm

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Things don't improve with age. Look at your truck. Look at your roof. Look in the mirror! (Red Green)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Richard Green
 

My stepson ten years ago or so built and taught building for Umiaks with lashing to hold the skin on the frames. IIRC his biggest build was about 30’ long for a group project. He likes those primitive skills experiences.

Rich

On Nov 19, 2020, at 1:42 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Thanks, Andy. A good photo essay. Regarding the 1,000 staples and the patches:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001144X3E/themotherofal-20

Platt Monfort used HeatnBond on his Geodesic Airolite boats to hold the skin on, and for patches. I don't know that I'd trust it in the long term without something like a rubrail over it. It's supposed to be very strong in shear, but weak resisting peel.

Building boats the Dave Gentry way (not his invention, he just likes it and has done a lot to promote it) is quick, cheap, relatively easy, and fun. It's kinda relaxing. :o) You're never caught with a batch of epoxy going off before you're done worth it. The lashing is kinda tedious, but you can stop any time you want. When you come back and see that you did something wrong, you just pull out your pocketknife and do it over. :o) I've helped on several of the Toledo Boathouse builds, but have never done a whole build myself:

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

A book about the general method:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1480007609/themotherofal-20

On 11/17/2020 2:54 PM, Andrew wrote:
Here's a essay to get started. I'll do a good job of documenting my next build
http://andrewlinn.com/2019/190824_igo/index.htm

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Things don't improve with age. Look at your truck. Look at your roof. Look in the mirror! (Red Green)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I used "Heat and Bond" on my kayak, $2 something per roll at Walmart in the sewing section.
I don't have a rub rail over it, but I've not used that boat much so I can't say how well it it'll last. I did a couple tear off tests before I did it and I was happy with it. I also did a full 90 degrees so the fabric tapes down on top on the gunnel, this means it's away in shear even if I push on the inside of the hull.
-Jove

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 2:19 AM Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:
My stepson ten years ago or so built and taught building for Umiaks with lashing to hold the skin on the frames.  IIRC his biggest build was about 30’ long for a group project.  He likes those primitive skills experiences.   

Rich

> On Nov 19, 2020, at 1:42 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
>
> Thanks, Andy. A good photo essay. Regarding the 1,000 staples and the patches:
>
> https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001144X3E/themotherofal-20
>
> Platt Monfort used HeatnBond on his Geodesic Airolite boats to hold the skin on, and for patches. I don't know that I'd trust it in the long term without something like a rubrail over it. It's supposed to be very strong in shear, but weak resisting peel.
>
> Building boats the Dave Gentry way (not his invention, he just likes it and has done a lot to promote it) is quick, cheap, relatively easy, and fun. It's kinda relaxing. :o) You're never caught with a batch of epoxy going off before you're done worth it. The lashing is kinda tedious, but you can stop any time you want. When you come back and see that you did something wrong, you just pull out your pocketknife and do it over. :o) I've helped on several of the Toledo Boathouse builds, but have never done a whole build myself:
>
> http://gentrycustomboats.com/
>
> A book about the general method:
>
> https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1480007609/themotherofal-20
>
> On 11/17/2020 2:54 PM, Andrew wrote:
>> Here's a essay to get started. I'll do a good job of documenting my next build
>> http://andrewlinn.com/2019/190824_igo/index.htm
>
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> Things don't improve with age. Look at your truck. Look at your roof. Look in the mirror! (Red Green)
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>