Topics

sailboat I don't need to register?


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?  
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
-Jove


Case Turner
 

Sailboat under 12’ don’t have to be registered. So anything under 12’ you can put a sail on. You still will need your Water way access permit.

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 30, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:


Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?  
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
-Jove


Andrew
 

Bolger Cartopper comes to mind.  Simple enough to build in stitch and glue, small sprit rig (leg o' mutton), 11'6", light enough to "car top", plans for $80: https://www.instantboats.com/product/cartopper-rowing-and-sailing-version/

Andy

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 1:44 PM Case Turner <dirtsailor2003@...> wrote:
Sailboat under 12’ don’t have to be registered. So anything under 12’ you can put a sail on. You still will need your Water way access permit.

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 30, 2020, at 1:22 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:


Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?  
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
-Jove


 

Sailboats under 12' don't need to be registered, as long as you don't put _any_ motor on 'em. Not even an electric trolling motor:

"(ORS 830.770) To operate a sailboat 12’ or more in length or any motorboat, an operator must carry a valid signed Certificate of Number on the boat. The boat registration number (e.g. OR 123 ABC) must be displayed on the starboard and port sides of the forward bow of the boat (ORS 830.780) plus the current registration decal."

Kayaks under 12' are mighty small, except maybe for those fat plastic river kayaks. They're cheap, fairly light, and their fatness will give extra stability to carry sail. You won't feel guilty about drilling and sawing on one to try to make it into a sailboat. <g> They don't have much directional stability, though...

In "real" boats, not kayaks, Dave Gentry has a 10-footer that looks like it'd do the trick just fine. I've sailed in Dave Clemmer's Atkin Vintage, a similarly proportioned boat, and found it to be a thoroughly practical boat, though my legs got cramped sitting on the floorboards while sailing. It also rowed well. I see that Gentry gave the helmsman seats to sit on. :o) A straightforward "fuselage frame" build:

http://gentrycustomboats.com/Annabelle.html

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Dinks/Vintage.html

More complicated to build, but lighter, Platt Monfort has some sail, and oar and sail, boats under 12'. The "Classics" and the Cricket 12. I was hoping Blivit was that short, but alas, it's a foot too long. There may be a set of Classic molds available for free:

http://gaboats.com/boats/

You may have noticed I'm leaning towards skin-on-frame for a cartop boat. <g>

An adventuresome Coot could convert any multi-chine or round-bottom boat they fancied to skin-on-frame construction.

On 11/30/2020 1:22 PM, Jove wrote:
Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I just think it's rather odd that a nation that prides itself on its virility should feel compelled to strap on forty pounds of protective gear just in order to play rugby. (Rupert Giles on American football)
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That link didn't work for me. This one did:

https://www.instantboats.com/product/cartopper-11-6-x-4-0/

Dan M has a Cartopper he built. Maybe he can tell us how it sails, and how easy it was to build. Some people have complained about slow tacking in Cartoppers, because of the odd configuration with the centerboard way up in the bow, and a big rudder sharing the lateral resistance job. Many other cartopper sailors haven't complained, and Bolger used the setup on some larger boats. <shrug> Maybe the complainers were just traditionalists who didn't trust something new, and they subconsciously made their suspicions self fulfilling. ;o)

On 11/30/2020 1:51 PM, Andrew wrote:
Bolger Cartopper comes to mind.  Simple enough to build in stitch and glue, small sprit rig (leg o' mutton), 11'6", light enough to "car top", plans for $80:
https://www.instantboats.com/product/cartopper-rowing-and-sailing-version/
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Any boy who does not read and enjoy Slocum's "Sailing Alone" should be drowned immediately. (Arthur Ransome)
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A real "quick and dirty" build. Two sheets of cheap plywood, and not many hours of work:

https://www.instantboats.com/product/teal-12-0-x-3-6/

https://flic.kr/p/dKmrz4

https://flic.kr/p/5Ymg6R

https://flic.kr/p/5YquHA

Of course the rig and foils are as much work as a more able boat...

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field. (Niels Bohr)


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Case Turner
 

I was going to suggest a Welsford designed Scamp. As long as you don’t put a motor on it...

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 30, 2020, at 3:02 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

That link didn't work for me. This one did:

https://www.instantboats.com/product/cartopper-11-6-x-4-0/

Dan M has a Cartopper he built. Maybe he can tell us how it sails, and how easy it was to build. Some people have complained about slow tacking in Cartoppers, because of the odd configuration with the centerboard way up in the bow, and a big rudder sharing the lateral resistance job. Many other cartopper sailors haven't complained, and Bolger used the setup on some larger boats. <shrug> Maybe the complainers were just traditionalists who didn't trust something new, and they subconsciously made their suspicions self fulfilling. ;o)

On 11/30/2020 1:51 PM, Andrew wrote:
Bolger Cartopper comes to mind. Simple enough to build in stitch and glue, small sprit rig (leg o' mutton), 11'6", light enough to "car top", plans for $80:
https://www.instantboats.com/product/cartopper-rowing-and-sailing-version/
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Any boy who does not read and enjoy Slocum's "Sailing Alone" should be drowned immediately. (Arthur Ransome)


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Dirt


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for all the suggestions folks.
My most used boat is a 16ft fiberglass kayak, from the mid 80s that weighs 48lb. it is an eddyline skylark. although they've called other boats by that name since. The glass deck is so thin you can move it with your toes.
I've used little kayaks and they can be frustrating, perhaps mainly because they didn't track well, which could be fixed with a good skeg.
I've also had plenty of fun in an 8ft dinghy, so I know they can get you where you need to go.
I like the 10ft vintage and Annabelle. That's about what I had in mind. But the Moffit ones are half the weight..... amazingly.
The scamp is a very cool boat, but I'm really looking for something closer to a kayak in weight for this niche.
Oz goose is perhaps a contender...

I have an 18ft windrose, and I was teaching a 11 year old girl to sail this spring, but she ended up getting too fearful of the tipping when the boat healed, and we had to stop, or only take her on light days. I wondered what she'd be like in a small open boat since she's been ok in kayaks. Anyone have experience with that fear in kids? 

Looks like if I stay under 10 ft I won't need the waterway access permit either.
I was not aware that the "access permit" had replaced the "invasive species permit" last year, maybe I just didn't read the thing.
And they won't print on waterproof paper anymore, so you need a drybag or keep it on your phone, which i bet is what they're pushing for.
What else don't I know?
image.png
-Jove


On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 3:14 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
A real "quick and dirty" build. Two sheets of cheap plywood, and not
many hours of work:

https://www.instantboats.com/product/teal-12-0-x-3-6/

https://flic.kr/p/dKmrz4

https://flic.kr/p/5Ymg6R

https://flic.kr/p/5YquHA

Of course the rig and foils are as much work as a more able boat...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a
very narrow field. (Niels Bohr)


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Plans and enough info to build Teal are in Dynamite Payson's book, Instant Boats (the original one, with the green cover).

Larger plans would be easier to build from, but you get lots of other fun stuff if you buy the book. <g>

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y5834z4e

or

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?cm_sp=SearchF-_-topnav-_-Results&;kn=Instant%20Boats%20payson&sts=t

Plans and enough info to build Cartopper are in Phil Bolger book, Boats With an Open Mind. Even more fun extra stuff in this one. :o)

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y579k6oh

or

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=bolger&;bi=0&bx=off&cm_sp=SearchF-_-Advtab1-_-Results&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=boats%20with%20an%20open%20mind

If you've got enough spare cash, Teal and some other Instant Boats are in The Folding Schooner, and Other Adventures in Boat Design, along with a lot of other interesting boats:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y23yrn7p

or

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=bolger&;bi=0&bx=off&cm_sp=SearchF-_-Advtab1-_-Results&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=folding%20schooner

On 11/30/2020 3:14 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
A real "quick and dirty" build. Two sheets of cheap plywood, and not many hours of work:
https://www.instantboats.com/product/teal-12-0-x-3-6/
https://flic.kr/p/dKmrz4
https://flic.kr/p/5Ymg6R
https://flic.kr/p/5YquHA
Of course the rig and foils are as much work as a more able boat...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I loved autumn, the one season of the year that God seemed to have put there just for the beauty of it. (Lee Maynard)
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Moffit? Is that your spellchecker's idea of "Monfort?" ;o) Geodesic Airolite boats are a lot trickier to build than Gentry's lashed "fuselage frame" boats. Monfort's boats use a very light frame reinforced with Kevlar roving. The Toledo Boathouse built a Classic 12 for me, and it took them quite a while. I think a solo builder who can work more than a few hours once a week would have a better time of it.

Dave's Vintage travels in the bed of a Toyota Tacoma like mine, but I think it's a bit much for cartopping. If someone converted a Vintage to glued plywood lapstrake, without frames, it'd be lighter, and could handle more abuse. But Gentry's Annabelle Skiff is the same size as Vintage, and already designed for skin on frame. I don't know if it's better or worse than Vintage, but it has a good pedigree so the difference shouldn't be great, one way or the other.

An Oz Goose is Big. It's only 12' long, but it's the same 4' wide at the bow and the stern as it is in the middle. People cartop Ducks, but 8' long is really too short for a decent sailboat, IMO.

You need a "waterway access" permit to paddle your kayak, and you can use the same one in all your boats. I think a 10' sailboat is a lot better than an 8' one. Be careful to make sure that any 12' boat you build is an inch less than 12' long. That may require a slight adjustment when building, but won't affect performance. The Law says "sailboat 12' and over".

Your Windrose ought not to be very scary, with a heavy swing keel hanging way down. It may heel pretty far, but it shouldn't feel like it's gonna go all the way over. Can you shorten sail? That might make her more comfortable when the wind blows. Show her how to ease the mainsheet in gusts, or head up. If she feels she can control the heel herself she should gain confidence. And tell her that if she really gets scared she can just let go of the tiller and sheet and the boat will take care of itself. <g>

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/windrose-18

Boy, I'm really talkative today. I must be trying to avoid doing anything useful. ;o)

On 11/30/2020 4:35 PM, Jove wrote:
...
I like the 10ft vintage and Annabelle. That's about what I had in mind. But the Moffit ones are half the weight..... amazingly.
The scamp is a very cool boat, but I'm really looking for something closer to a kayak in weight for this niche.
Oz goose is perhaps a contender...
I have an 18ft windrose, and I was teaching a 11 year old girl to sail this spring, but she ended up getting too fearful of the tipping when the boat healed, and we had to stop, or only take her on light days. I wondered what she'd be like in a small open boat since she's been ok in kayaks. Anyone have experience with that fear in kids?
Looks like if I stay under 10 ft I won't need the waterway access permit either.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns; he should be drawn and quoted. (Fred Allen)
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Mark Neuhaus
 

Here's a website with a number of designs.  I built his Summer Breeze many years ago just so I wouldn't have to register it.  Makes a fine rowboat, also. There used to be a website where a guy built it for a small motor and called it 40-grit, which he said was the finest sandpaper he used on it.

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 9:22 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?  
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
-Jove


Mark Neuhaus
 

Probably wondering what the heck I was talking about, weren't you?  :-)


On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 1:44 AM Mark Neuhaus via groups.io <moonlitturtle1934=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here's a website with a number of designs.  I built his Summer Breeze many years ago just so I wouldn't have to register it.  Makes a fine rowboat, also. There used to be a website where a guy built it for a small motor and called it 40-grit, which he said was the finest sandpaper he used on it.

On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 9:22 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Hey folks,
  What are you suggestions?  
I'm thinking the boat I'm missing is a really small dingy that's small enough I don't have to register it, and it's light enough I can carry it to the water in tricky locations. and it is easy to store.
I don't really want to do a windsurfer or similar, I've done those. and they require too much wind to have a peaceful sail in my book. I"m more interested in kayaking with a sail.
The problem is I think you're meant to register a kayak if you put a sail on it. Which I find kind of annoying.
What are you suggestions? What boats have other worked into this niche?
open to designs or off the shelf boats.....Maybe SOF, maybe glass or carbon over foam.
Super simple, good for adults, or teaching folks.
-Jove


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for the pointers John.
Thank you all for the boats you've connected me to today.
Has anyone seen or heard of any small catamarans? I think this kid might enjoy a cat.
A deck between two 12 ft  SOF kayaks perhaps.

I read a book a few years ago about SOF kayaks it offered 2 designs of greenland style single chine kayaks, single and tandem The side walls were stiffened with a zig zag of wood glued to the gunnel and first chine, a method I've not seen in other designs. They also recommended cotton duck canvas and house paint. Anyone familiar? I think they called the single a walrus. 17 ft.
I mention it because the wood zigzag is an interesting stiffening method alternative to the kevlar X pattern.

-Jove


On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 5:31 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Moffit? Is that your spellchecker's idea of "Monfort?" ;o) Geodesic
Airolite boats are a lot trickier to build than Gentry's lashed
"fuselage frame" boats. Monfort's boats use a very light frame
reinforced with Kevlar roving. The Toledo Boathouse built a Classic 12
for me, and it took them quite a while. I think a solo builder who can
work more than a few hours once a week would have a better time of it.

Dave's Vintage travels in the bed of a Toyota Tacoma like mine, but I
think it's a bit much for cartopping. If someone converted a Vintage to
glued plywood lapstrake, without frames, it'd be lighter, and could
handle more abuse. But Gentry's Annabelle Skiff is the same size as
Vintage, and already designed for skin on frame. I don't know if it's
better or worse than Vintage, but it has a good pedigree so the
difference shouldn't be great, one way or the other.

An Oz Goose is Big. It's only 12' long, but it's the same 4' wide at the
bow and the stern as it is in the middle. People cartop Ducks, but 8'
long is really too short for a decent sailboat, IMO.

You need a "waterway access" permit to paddle your kayak, and you can
use the same one in all your boats. I think a 10' sailboat is a lot
better than an 8' one. Be careful to make sure that any 12' boat you
build is an inch less than 12' long. That may require a slight
adjustment when building, but won't affect performance. The Law says
"sailboat 12' and over".

Your Windrose ought not to be very scary, with a heavy swing keel
hanging way down. It may heel pretty far, but it shouldn't feel like
it's gonna go all the way over. Can you shorten sail? That might make
her more comfortable when the wind blows. Show her how to ease the
mainsheet in gusts, or head up. If she feels she can control the heel
herself she should gain confidence. And tell her that if she really gets
scared she can just let go of the tiller and sheet and the boat will
take care of itself. <g>

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/windrose-18

Boy, I'm really talkative today. I must be trying to avoid doing
anything useful. ;o)



On 11/30/2020 4:35 PM, Jove wrote:
> ...
> I like the 10ft vintage and Annabelle. That's about what I had in mind.
> But the Moffit ones are half the weight..... amazingly.
> The scamp is a very cool boat, but I'm really looking for something
> closer to a kayak in weight for this niche.
> Oz goose is perhaps a contender...
>
> I have an 18ft windrose, and I was teaching a 11 year old girl to sail
> this spring, but she ended up getting too fearful of the tipping when
> the boat healed, and we had to stop, or only take her on light days. I
> wondered what she'd be like in a small open boat since she's been ok in
> kayaks. Anyone have experience with that fear in kids?

> Looks like if I stay under 10 ft I won't need the waterway access permit
> either.
> ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns; he should be drawn and
quoted. (Fred Allen)


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Lynn Watson
 

I built a Cartopper about 30 years ago, when 1/4" shop grade ply was five bucks a sheet, and loved the boat. Never was in a boat that size that felt so secure and comfortable in 15 knots and 2 foot wind waves. The bottom panel rocker and flare in the bilge panels made the hull ride in lumpy water like a duck. That also meant that the boat would never ever plane, in any wind, but it was effortless to row if you weren't in a hurry and really would carry three grownups easily.

I put a balanced lug on her, much better than the designed rigs, IMHO, and found tacking to be easy if I kept my weight centered or forward a bit. Using a push-pull tiller or rope steering on a yoke would help with that. The big rudder and small centerboard work fine; an excellent idea, as usual, from Mr. Bolger.

The as-built weight came out about 100lbs; not a problem to carry when I was 40, but I wouldn't try it now.  Using 4mm okume might save 30 or maybe 40lbs? Don't know if that's enough to bother with. Alternately, a friend recently built a Danny Greene Chameleon nesting dinghy in 4mm (or was it 3?) and it's absurdly light; the heaviest section weighs 35lbs or so. Nice boat.

Hope that helps,
Lynn Watson


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks Lynn,
I appreciate the extra info on the cartopper.
I may have seen a cartopper up at the wooden boat show a couple years ago. I was rowing some of the CLC demo boats, They had an "expedition wherry" which had a nice melon seed shape (18ftx 36")  and some rocker and it rode the waves well.
The "Oxford racer" was a skinny tooth pick boat (21ft x 21"), I'd been racing sculling singles often at the time so I was eager to try it out. It rowered terribly in that swell and chop, and twisted around under me like a snake as it tried to find whatever angle was flattest. I'm sure it's good in flat water.
It makes sense that the cartoper would ride chop well.
There was an old guy sailing back and forth about 100yrds out in and out of all the anchored boats, in what could have been a cartopper, a fairly narrow dingy with good rocker and he sat down in it like a bathtub.
He looked very confident and comfortable.
Could a person sleep in the hull of a cartopper? for out of the way camping.
-Jove



On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 9:48 PM Lynn Watson <lynn@...> wrote:
I built a Cartopper about 30 years ago, when 1/4" shop grade ply was five bucks a sheet, and loved the boat. Never was in a boat that size that felt so secure and comfortable in 15 knots and 2 foot wind waves. The bottom panel rocker and flare in the bilge panels made the hull ride in lumpy water like a duck. That also meant that the boat would never ever plane, in any wind, but it was effortless to row if you weren't in a hurry and really would carry three grownups easily.

I put a balanced lug on her, much better than the designed rigs, IMHO, and found tacking to be easy if I kept my weight centered or forward a bit. Using a push-pull tiller or rope steering on a yoke would help with that. The big rudder and small centerboard work fine; an excellent idea, as usual, from Mr. Bolger.

The as-built weight came out about 100lbs; not a problem to carry when I was 40, but I wouldn't try it now.  Using 4mm okume might save 30 or maybe 40lbs? Don't know if that's enough to bother with. Alternately, a friend recently built a Danny Greene Chameleon nesting dinghy in 4mm (or was it 3?) and it's absurdly light; the heaviest section weighs 35lbs or so. Nice boat.

Hope that helps,
Lynn Watson


 

Thanks, Lynn. Just as I thought, the Cartopper complainers were probably quick to blame the boat's unusual configuration for their own sailing errors, or they didn't take the time to get to know the boat. Bolger usually knew what he was doing, and when he didn't he wasn't afraid to tell us about his failures.

Do you remember the St. Valerie that came to the PT Festival some years ago? That had the little, forward centerboard and big rudder.

https://www.woodenboat.com/register-wooden-boats/la-belle-pixie

There was a Camper at the festival, or maybe a Palooza, not long ago, with the same setup.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/564216659540447875/

On 11/30/2020 9:48 PM, Lynn W wrote:
I built a Cartopper about 30 years ago, when 1/4" shop grade ply was five bucks a sheet, and loved the boat. Never was in a boat that size that felt so secure and comfortable in 15 knots and 2 foot wind waves. The bottom panel rocker and flare in the bilge panels made the hull ride in lumpy water like a duck. That also meant that the boat would never ever plane, in any wind, but it was effortless to row if you weren't in a hurry and really would carry three grownups easily.
I put a balanced lug on her, much better than the designed rigs, IMHO, and found tacking to be easy if I kept my weight centered or forward a bit. Using a push-pull tiller or rope steering on a yoke would help with that. The big rudder and small centerboard work fine; an excellent idea, as usual, from Mr. Bolger.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
One's life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others, by means of love, friendship, indignation, and compassion. (Simone de Beauvoir)
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Lynn Watson
 

Hi John, how ya doing? I do remember the St. Valery and its huge balanced rudder. Never was able to get aboard and see below though, maybe another chance someday. Don't remember a Camper specifically; I might have conflated it with one of the Michalak box boats.

Joel, there have been a couple of Cartoppers at the Festival over the years. I think the one I saw more recently was blue, and set up just to row. Not built quite to spec either. The one you saw out sailing could have been a Cartopper, or possibly a Shellback Dinghy; they're pretty similar.

The CLC expedition wherry looks like a good boat to go places in, much better than your toothpick:) The next step up in hardcoreness might be the Colin Angus RowCruiser, with sleeping accommodations in the onboard coffin. There's a chapter in Boats With An Open Mind, where Bolger posits the Cartopper as a spare bedroom for a guest or the kids, with a cartoon of a somewhat goofy looking tent cover. Ingress and egress would be over the transom(!). He also excuses the pretty sheerline as providing added freeboard aft for hanging bodies off the back end (can't just be for pretty, you know, not for Bolger...).

I've been fooling with a design for an expanded Cartopper, 14' x 4'6", to use as a competent daysailer and messabout boat. Trailered, of course. Maybe someday I'll get it built and bring it out for show-and-tell.

cheers,
Lynn


 

The Bolger camper had a For Sale sign on it at the 2016 Pocket Yacht Palooza. Good thing I drove my Prius to that one. ;o)

https://flic.kr/p/KGj9Sk

https://flic.kr/p/KGja2D

https://flic.kr/p/JSz5tS

What are you doing for your boat fixes since Katie Mae found a new home?

https://flic.kr/p/KLmYbW

On 12/1/2020 11:02 AM, Lynn W wrote:
Hi John, how ya doing? I do remember the St. Valery and its huge balanced rudder. Never was able to get aboard and see below though, maybe another chance someday. Don't remember a Camper specifically; I might have conflated it with one of the Michalak box boats.
...
I've been fooling with a design for an expanded Cartopper, 14' x 4'6", to use as a competent daysailer and messabout boat. Trailered, of course. Maybe someday I'll get it built and bring it out for show-and-tell.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. (Albert Camus)
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A Summer Breeze completed the first Salish 100. It was the least capable boat in the fleet, but the skipper was a good sport. He signed up again for this year's S100, probably planning to bring an auxiliary motor this time. <g> Something nice happened when a teenager who's building his own Summer Breeze showed up in Olympia to see Bob's boat in the flesh. :o) Maybe we'll see Bob and La Madalena next July. Another Summer Breeze came to one of our Dexter messabouts:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3b699nr

or

https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=43145927%40N00&;sort=date-taken-desc&text=summer%20breeze&view_all=1

On 11/30/2020 9:46 AM, Mark N wrote:
http://www.simplicityboats.com
Probably wondering what the heck I was talking about, weren't you?  :-)
On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 1:44 AM Mark N wrote:
Here's a website with a number of designs.  I built his Summer
Breeze many years ago just so I wouldn't have to register it.  Makes
a fine rowboat, also. There used to be a website where a guy built
it for a small motor and called it 40-grit, which he said was the
finest sandpaper he used on it.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Virtue never has been as respectable as money. (Mark Twain)
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Case Turner
 

John that link goes to Flickr’s search and shows a bunch of pictures from summer. Not your photo though.

Case

Sent from not here

On Dec 1, 2020, at 1:26 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

A Summer Breeze completed the first Salish 100. It was the least capable boat in the fleet, but the skipper was a good sport. He signed up again for this year's S100, probably planning to bring an auxiliary motor this time. <g> Something nice happened when a teenager who's building his own Summer Breeze showed up in Olympia to see Bob's boat in the flesh. :o) Maybe we'll see Bob and La Madalena next July. Another Summer Breeze came to one of our Dexter messabouts:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3b699nr

or

https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=43145927%40N00&;sort=date-taken-desc&text=summer%20breeze&view_all=1

On 11/30/2020 9:46 AM, Mark N wrote:
http://www.simplicityboats.com
Probably wondering what the heck I was talking about, weren't you? :-)
On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 1:44 AM Mark N wrote:
Here's a website with a number of designs. I built his Summer
Breeze many years ago just so I wouldn't have to register it. Makes
a fine rowboat, also. There used to be a website where a guy built
it for a small motor and called it 40-grit, which he said was the
finest sandpaper he used on it.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Virtue never has been as respectable as money. (Mark Twain)


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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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