Pray for Rain!


 

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

https://preview.tinyurl.com/EUGWX

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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)


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Richard Green
 

I confess I saw the graphs and such and had no idea what I was seeing.

Rich

On Mar 17, 2021, at 5:36 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

https://preview.tinyurl.com/EUGWX

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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)


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https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

The solid red line in the diagrams is the "Water Control Diagram", what everybody calls "The Curve". It's the rate of filling (and draining) the lake the Corps of Engineers aspires to. The Curve hasn't been updated since about 1963, when They raised the dam a foot or so. The solid dark blue line is the actual water level, which, if the civilians at the Corps had good crystal balls, would follow the Curve closely, except when they're holding water back to keep from washing away Monroe. If They should hold back water to prevent a flood, They're supposed to let it out again as soon as They can to get back to the Curve.

The green and blue lines at the bottom of some of the graphs show the flow of water into the lake (green) and the flow of water being released (blue). The fuller the lake is, the more inflow it takes to raise it a foot. Dotted lines on the 7 Day chart show what They're crystal balls tell Them to expect for the next few days.

The broken horizontal lines in the 30 days chart show the elevations of the launch ramps on the lake.

You can check the lake levels at all the Willamette Project reservoirs here:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/

Hover over a little orange dam to get a text showing current elevation and flows, click on a dam to get charts. The numbers in the "teacups" show the percentage of full for each reservoir, and the percentage above or below that lake's Curve. Fern Ridge is 10% below where it should be right now.

I hope that explains things well enough. Fern Ridge sailors watch the charts closely every spring, and gripe a lot about the CoE employees. <g> I think they're professionals who try to do a good job, but They have to follow outdated guidelines, probably with occasional interference from the uniformed Brass, and the Army issue crystal balls really aren't very good. But I'll bet they're expensive. <g>

Look at the chart for Fern Ridge. We didn't make sacrifices to the rain gods and dance naked on the docks last year, and look what happened! :o( I hope out efforts this year were enough to get the lake full this year.

On 3/18/2021 12:30 PM, Rich G wrote:
I confess I saw the graphs and such and had no idea what I was seeing.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The first day of spring was once the time for taking the young virgins into the fields, there in dalliance to set an example in fertility for nature to follow. Now we just set the clocks an hour ahead and change the oil in the crankcase. (E. B. White)
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Richard Green
 

Ah, that helps to clear it up, thanks!

Rich

On Mar 18, 2021, at 3:44 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/frn.pdf

The solid red line in the diagrams is the "Water Control Diagram", what everybody calls "The Curve". It's the rate of filling (and draining) the lake the Corps of Engineers aspires to. The Curve hasn't been updated since about 1963, when They raised the dam a foot or so. The solid dark blue line is the actual water level, which, if the civilians at the Corps had good crystal balls, would follow the Curve closely, except when they're holding water back to keep from washing away Monroe. If They should hold back water to prevent a flood, They're supposed to let it out again as soon as They can to get back to the Curve.

The green and blue lines at the bottom of some of the graphs show the flow of water into the lake (green) and the flow of water being released (blue). The fuller the lake is, the more inflow it takes to raise it a foot. Dotted lines on the 7 Day chart show what They're crystal balls tell Them to expect for the next few days.

The broken horizontal lines in the 30 days chart show the elevations of the launch ramps on the lake.

You can check the lake levels at all the Willamette Project reservoirs here:

https://www.nwd-wc.usace.army.mil/nwp/teacup/willamette/

Hover over a little orange dam to get a text showing current elevation and flows, click on a dam to get charts. The numbers in the "teacups" show the percentage of full for each reservoir, and the percentage above or below that lake's Curve. Fern Ridge is 10% below where it should be right now.

I hope that explains things well enough. Fern Ridge sailors watch the charts closely every spring, and gripe a lot about the CoE employees. <g> I think they're professionals who try to do a good job, but They have to follow outdated guidelines, probably with occasional interference from the uniformed Brass, and the Army issue crystal balls really aren't very good. But I'll bet they're expensive. <g>

Look at the chart for Fern Ridge. We didn't make sacrifices to the rain gods and dance naked on the docks last year, and look what happened! :o( I hope out efforts this year were enough to get the lake full this year.

On 3/18/2021 12:30 PM, Rich G wrote:
I confess I saw the graphs and such and had no idea what I was seeing.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The first day of spring was once the time for taking the young virgins into the fields, there in dalliance to set an example in fertility for nature to follow. Now we just set the clocks an hour ahead and change the oil in the crankcase. (E. B. White)


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