Topics

Oh, the screwups


dan mulholland
 

I've been spending a lot of time working on boats during the fun.  Some of you know that I managed to test the floatation  in the San Francisco Pelican I took to the Toledo show last summer.  The motor didn't get dunked, and the tank floated.  I started the engine after the fun, all was good; went with the guys to Newport on Monday, engine ran fine.  I was surprised at how little fuel was used, since the primary  purpose of a  1971 Evinrude 4 hp engine is to transfer gas and oil to the water, and, while doing that, move a boat along a little bit.

To rid myself of old mixed fuel, I use it in the lowest social status  engines I have, the lawnmower first, and then the chipper second.  The outboard gas seemed dirtier than usual... and then the  lawnmower and chipper didn't like the fuel.  It turns out that they just will not run on salt water.  Because, of course, that was what was in the  bottom of the tank, and dirtiness was  rust.

This provided me with an opportunity to try electrolysis as a method of rust removal.  A piece of rebar, with some wood and PVC pipe to act as insulators, water with washing soda, and DC power from the battery  charger.  It worked, but it is hard to get the anode- the rebar- close to all of the areas of the tank bottom.  So, I followed the electrolysis with Oxalic acid treatment.  That looks like it worked pretty well.  Then  a baking soda solution  wash, to "kill" the acid.  The tank is sitting in  the sun,  with  the remaining water evaporating, I hope.  


Dan


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Dan,
I was reading some interesting stuff about making gas tanks out of plywood, glass cloth and a good coat of West systems epoxy.  Could be a good coating for your metal tank, Might be worth looking into.


On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 12:09 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
I've been spending a lot of time working on boats during the fun.  Some of you know that I managed to test the floatation  in the San Francisco Pelican I took to the Toledo show last summer.  The motor didn't get dunked, and the tank floated.  I started the engine after the fun, all was good; went with the guys to Newport on Monday, engine ran fine.  I was surprised at how little fuel was used, since the primary  purpose of a  1971 Evinrude 4 hp engine is to transfer gas and oil to the water, and, while doing that, move a boat along a little bit.

To rid myself of old mixed fuel, I use it in the lowest social status  engines I have, the lawnmower first, and then the chipper second.  The outboard gas seemed dirtier than usual... and then the  lawnmower and chipper didn't like the fuel.  It turns out that they just will not run on salt water.  Because, of course, that was what was in the  bottom of the tank, and dirtiness was  rust.

This provided me with an opportunity to try electrolysis as a method of rust removal.  A piece of rebar, with some wood and PVC pipe to act as insulators, water with washing soda, and DC power from the battery  charger.  It worked, but it is hard to get the anode- the rebar- close to all of the areas of the tank bottom.  So, I followed the electrolysis with Oxalic acid treatment.  That looks like it worked pretty well.  Then  a baking soda solution  wash, to "kill" the acid.  The tank is sitting in  the sun,  with  the remaining water evaporating, I hope.  


Dan


Pete Leenhouts
 

I've always heard those tanks were good only for leaded gas, without the additives used now. A call to the techline at Gougeon Brothers would answer the question, thought, with certainty. 

Pete


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jul 20, 2020 12:13 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Oh, the screwups

Dan,
I was reading some interesting stuff about making gas tanks out of plywood, glass cloth and a good coat of West systems epoxy.  Could be a good coating for your metal tank, Might be worth looking into.

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 12:09 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
I've been spending a lot of time working on boats during the fun.  Some of you know that I managed to test the floatation  in the San Francisco Pelican I took to the Toledo show last summer.  The motor didn't get dunked, and the tank floated.  I started the engine after the fun, all was good; went with the guys to Newport on Monday, engine ran fine.  I was surprised at how little fuel was used, since the primary  purpose of a  1971 Evinrude 4 hp engine is to transfer gas and oil to the water, and, while doing that, move a boat along a little bit.

To rid myself of old mixed fuel, I use it in the lowest social status  engines I have, the lawnmower first, and then the chipper second.  The outboard gas seemed dirtier than usual... and then the  lawnmower and chipper didn't like the fuel.  It turns out that they just will not run on salt water.  Because, of course, that was what was in the  bottom of the tank, and dirtiness was  rust.

This provided me with an opportunity to try electrolysis as a method of rust removal.  A piece of rebar, with some wood and PVC pipe to act as insulators, water with washing soda, and DC power from the battery  charger.  It worked, but it is hard to get the anode- the rebar- close to all of the areas of the tank bottom.  So, I followed the electrolysis with Oxalic acid treatment.  That looks like it worked pretty well.  Then  a baking soda solution  wash, to "kill" the acid.  The tank is sitting in  the sun,  with  the remaining water evaporating, I hope.  


Dan