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New Chuckanu for sale


Andrew Linn
 


 

Good lookin' Chuckanu, Andrew. :o) You say the skin is sealed with "roofing caulk". That's something different. Can you explain?

On 1/9/2021 8:33 PM, Andrew wrote:
Coot discount: $750
Craigslist ad:
https://salem.craigslist.org/spo/d/salem-skin-on-frame-canoe-new/7259734476.html


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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I want people to talk to one another no matter what their difference of opinion might be. (Studs Terkel)


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Andrew Linn
 

We sell different kinds of tube sealants. It's just a tough, rubbery, sealant, intended for use on roofs - flashing and the like. Perfect for sealing up the holes left in the fabric from stitching and shrinking.

On 1/10/2021 4:00 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
Good lookin' Chuckanu, Andrew. :o) You say the skin is sealed with "roofing caulk". That's something different. Can you explain?

On 1/9/2021 8:33 PM, Andrew wrote:
Coot discount: $750
Craigslist ad:
https://salem.craigslist.org/spo/d/salem-skin-on-frame-canoe-new/7259734476.html


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I'd imagine it's polyurethane based?
Those tend to be the best ones for adhesion and durability. also tend to be a bit more expensive.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 5:50 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
We sell different kinds of tube sealants. It's just a tough, rubbery,
sealant, intended for use on roofs - flashing and the like. Perfect for
sealing up the holes left in the fabric from stitching and shrinking.

On 1/10/2021 4:00 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Good lookin' Chuckanu, Andrew. :o) You say the skin is sealed with
> "roofing caulk". That's something different. Can you explain?
>
> On 1/9/2021 8:33 PM, Andrew wrote:
>> Coot discount: $750
>> Craigslist ad:
>>
>
> https://salem.craigslist.org/spo/d/salem-skin-on-frame-canoe-new/7259734476.html
>
>







dan mulholland
 

Andrew,

More follow up-

You may know that I'm building a boat of the same construction  type, same fabric.  Curious about the coating you used, the roofing caulk, with latex over  it.  In the Dave Gentry  plans (Shenandoah Whitehall)  I'm  using, it suggests applying "PL premium construction adhesive" or similar, basically on the bottom of the boat only, not the sides, followed by two coats of oil based paint.  I'm  curious about the roofing caulk, what type, and how  it is applied-as in do you squirt it out of the the tube, then roll it?  Opinion on the latex  vs oil paint appreciated, too, recognize that's almost a religious question.


Dan in Eugene


Andrew Linn
 

I don't do the PL Premium thing, but Dave knows a heck of a lot more than I do.

The boat is skinned in 8-oz polyester. It's attached to the frame with Heat-n-Bond instead of staples this time. My stapler was having a hard time driving the staples into the Yellow Pine. The skin is trimmed and stitched at the stems.

3 coats of latex exterior on the skin. Waterproofs it very nicely.

I always end up with holes and such when I stitch - places where the fabric threads pull away from each other. I take a tube of caulking and run it down both sides of the seam, then wet my fingers and smooth it out. I coat the entire seam and feather it back onto the fabric. Once cured, I paint it.

The caulk is just caulk, whatever rubbery, semi-fluid that strikes your fancy. I've tried tar cheapo painter's caulk, but it's not very durable - it tears. I've tried tar-based stuff. Meh. The roofing stuff seems OK, but I am going to switch to PL Concrete and Masonry adhesive. That stuff cures like a tire. It is very durable and flexible. It does require mineral spirits for cleanup.

That's my story and I am sticking to it.

On 1/10/2021 7:32 PM, dan mulholland wrote:
Andrew,

More follow up-

You may know that I'm building a boat of the same construction type, same fabric.  Curious about the coating you used, the roofing caulk, with latex over  it.  In the Dave Gentry  plans (Shenandoah Whitehall)  I'm  using, it suggests applying "PL premium construction adhesive" or similar, basically on the bottom of the boat only, not the sides, followed by two coats of oil based paint.  I'm  curious about the roofing caulk, what type, and how  it is applied-as in do you squirt it out of the the tube, then roll it?  Opinion on the latex  vs oil paint appreciated, too, recognize that's almost a religious question.


Dan in Eugene
_._,_._,_
------------------------------------------------------------------------


 

Thanks, Andrew. So you only use the caulk on the sewn seams.

IIRC, Dave Gentry uses a plastic squeegee to work PL Premium into the fabric on the bottom, for extra durability.

I wonder how a, supposedly, flexible roof sealant like Snow Seal would work as a more durable coating than mere paint? It'd be heavier, I imagine. And more expensive:

https://www.amesresearch.com/product/snow-seal-reflective-roof-coating

How's the Shenandoah Whitehall coming along, Dan?

Have you started on the Annabelle, Jove?

On 1/10/2021 7:58 PM, Andrew wrote:
I don't do the PL Premium thing, but Dave knows a heck of a lot more than I do.
The boat is skinned in 8-oz polyester. It's attached to the frame with Heat-n-Bond instead of staples this time. My stapler was having a hard time driving the staples into the Yellow Pine. The skin is trimmed and stitched at the stems.
3 coats of latex exterior on the skin. Waterproofs it very nicely.
I always end up with holes and such when I stitch - places where the fabric threads pull away from each other. I take a tube of caulking and run it down both sides of the seam, then wet my fingers and smooth it out. I coat the entire seam and feather it back onto the fabric. Once cured, I paint it.
The caulk is just caulk, whatever rubbery, semi-fluid that strikes your fancy. I've tried tar cheapo painter's caulk, but it's not very durable - it tears. I've tried tar-based stuff. Meh. The roofing stuff seems OK, but I am going to switch to PL Concrete and Masonry adhesive. That stuff cures like a tire. It is very durable and flexible. It does require mineral spirits for cleanup.
That's my story and I am sticking to it.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I once knew a writer who, after saying beautiful things about the sea, passed through a Pacific hurricane, and he became a changed man. (Joshua Slocum)
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How did you like working with the Heat-n-Bond, Andy? Platt Monfort said it's good for applying patches too. Use the Heat-n-Bond to paste a bit of fabric over your injury or mistake. Slap on some paint and it might not show much at all.

On 1/10/2021 7:58 PM, Andrew wrote:
...
The boat is skinned in 8-oz polyester. It's attached to the frame with Heat-n-Bond instead of staples this time. My stapler was having a hard time driving the staples into the Yellow Pine. The skin is trimmed and stitched at the stems.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into hamburgers. (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)
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Andrew Linn
 

Heat-n-Bond worked just fine. Probably how I am going to be doing these in the future.

On 1/10/2021 8:28 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
How did you like working with the Heat-n-Bond, Andy? Platt Monfort said it's good for applying patches too. Use the Heat-n-Bond to paste a bit of fabric over your injury or mistake. Slap on some paint and it might not show much at all.

On 1/10/2021 7:58 PM, Andrew wrote:
...
The boat is skinned in 8-oz polyester. It's attached to the frame with Heat-n-Bond instead of staples this time. My stapler was having a hard time driving the staples into the Yellow Pine. The skin is trimmed and stitched at the stems.
...


 

Next time you burn through a spot in the fabric, or screw it up in some other way, try taking Platt's advice and Heat-n-Bond a patch over it. If you do it before coating the fabric, it might not show at all...

On 1/11/2021 8:16 AM, Andrew wrote:
Heat-n-Bond worked just fine. Probably how I am going to be doing these in the future.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Any boy who does not read and enjoy Slocum's "Sailing Alone" should be drowned immediately. (Arthur Ransome)
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