Topics

Marine Electronics Non-Intensive Class

 

"Only 1 spot left! Marine Electrical Intensive Dec. 9-13" reads the subject of a message I got from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding.

Doesn't sound very Coot-like, does it? <g> But it reminded me that for some time I've been mildly urging Bob L to do a class at the Toledo Boathouses about how to use our VHF radios. After the Halloween float someone mentioned that it'd be a nice thing to have a class, seminar, or symposium where we learn how to use all our electronics and nav programs. Sounds good to me. I imagine a combination of "experts" teaching and Coots sharing. Should be fun and useful, and pizza is nearby.

Shall we do it?

--
John (@Jkohnen)
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon Johnson)

elaineginader
 

Yes this would be great for me.


On Sun, Dec 1, 2019, 12:01 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
"Only 1 spot left! Marine Electrical Intensive Dec. 9-13" reads the
subject of a message I got from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding.

Doesn't sound very Coot-like, does it? <g> But it reminded me that for
some time I've been mildly urging Bob L to do a class at the Toledo
Boathouses about how to use our VHF radios. After the Halloween float
someone mentioned that it'd be a nice thing to have a class, seminar, or
symposium where we learn how to use all our electronics and nav
programs. Sounds good to me. I imagine a combination of "experts"
teaching and Coots sharing. Should be fun and useful, and pizza is nearby.

Shall we do it?

--
John (jkohnen@...)
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River,
the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon
Johnson)




Richard Green
 

Well, I once navigated from Honolulu to Astoria with charts and a sextant but I got no idea how to set a waypoint with a GPS.  It would be good to learn somethings.

Rich

On Dec 1, 2019, at 12:03 PM, elaineginader <elaineginader@...> wrote:

Yes this would be great for me.

On Sun, Dec 1, 2019, 12:01 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
"Only 1 spot left! Marine Electrical Intensive Dec. 9-13" reads the 
subject of a message I got from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding.

Doesn't sound very Coot-like, does it? <g> But it reminded me that for 
some time I've been mildly urging Bob L to do a class at the Toledo 
Boathouses about how to use our VHF radios. After the Halloween float 
someone mentioned that it'd be a nice thing to have a class, seminar, or 
symposium where we learn how to use all our electronics and nav 
programs. Sounds good to me. I imagine a combination of "experts" 
teaching and Coots sharing. Should be fun and useful, and pizza is nearby.

Shall we do it?

-- 
John (jkohnen@...)
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, 
the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon 
Johnson)





Jim Young
 

I need to move closer or perhaps you can have that class closer to Montana? 😁


On Sun, Dec 1, 2019 at 1:01 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
"Only 1 spot left! Marine Electrical Intensive Dec. 9-13" reads the
subject of a message I got from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding.

Doesn't sound very Coot-like, does it? <g> But it reminded me that for
some time I've been mildly urging Bob L to do a class at the Toledo
Boathouses about how to use our VHF radios. After the Halloween float
someone mentioned that it'd be a nice thing to have a class, seminar, or
symposium where we learn how to use all our electronics and nav
programs. Sounds good to me. I imagine a combination of "experts"
teaching and Coots sharing. Should be fun and useful, and pizza is nearby.

Shall we do it?

--
John (jkohnen@...)
If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River,
the headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” (Lyndon
Johnson)






--
Jim Young,
mostly retired
Somers, MT

Mark Neuhaus
 

Hi John,

That was me who suggested it.

I figure it would be nice to learn the proper way to talk on the radio, but also to see the features that different radios have and what makes them useful.

Also, I think it would be great to share thoughts and examples of navigation programs, both on PCs and phones. Dan wanted something quick for your Newport float, and I believe he got something okay, but I suspect he (and several of us) would be happy seeing what else is available.

I'd be up for an overnight trip to Toledo to join in on something like this.

Mark

David Luckhardt
 

John K and all -

I believe that Bo Neil in Portland (aka "the voice of the Salish 100) is working on a short "How to use your Marine VHF radio" class for the 2020 Salish 100 folks, and might be persuaded to either teach part of your class or attend it for ideas for his own.  His class will probably focus on use, probably assuming that everyone already has their marine radio, so if you folks can work up material on desired features, it might be a very nice addition.

 

The Nav program element might be pretty complex and device-specific, or could be easy with everyone saying, "Navionics!" -- ;-)

 

I'll put my $0.02 in on desired small-boat handheld marine radio features:

1.  Ability to charge via USB, not the usual model-specific 110 charger <-- this was a huge issue on the 2019 Salish 100, for most of the smaller boats had USB battery packs/chargers but not either larger house batteries and inverters or the expensive 30a/125v -> standard plug dock/shore power adapter, assuming they remembered to bring their 110 charger/cradle AND power cord. 

2.  Decent range / power - at least the ability to select up to 6w broadcast power.

3.  Standard audio-plug or USB earbud/headset/mic, not the usual model-specific custom hardware.  If not wearing the radio while sailing or if running an outboard, it can be very hard to hear or make calls on handheld marine radios.

Case Turner
 

For those that hold Merchant Mariners licenses you are required to take a MROP (Marine Radio Operators Permit) certification class. When I took mine many eons ago you had to go the Federal Building in PDX to take the test. 

Now there are online courses and exams. Pretty spendy for Coots budgets, but there may be a way to get a group course or find an instructor willing to do a group class. Not sure if or who handles this anymore in Oregon. 

Case

Sent from not here

On Dec 3, 2019, at 7:15 AM, David Luckhardt <david.luckhardt@...> wrote:

John K and all -

I believe that Bo Neil in Portland (aka "the voice of the Salish 100) is working on a short "How to use your Marine VHF radio" class for the 2020 Salish 100 folks, and might be persuaded to either teach part of your class or attend it for ideas for his own.  His class will probably focus on use, probably assuming that everyone already has their marine radio, so if you folks can work up material on desired features, it might be a very nice addition.

 

The Nav program element might be pretty complex and device-specific, or could be easy with everyone saying, "Navionics!" -- ;-)

 

I'll put my $0.02 in on desired small-boat handheld marine radio features:

1.  Ability to charge via USB, not the usual model-specific 110 charger <-- this was a huge issue on the 2019 Salish 100, for most of the smaller boats had USB battery packs/chargers but not either larger house batteries and inverters or the expensive 30a/125v -> standard plug dock/shore power adapter, assuming they remembered to bring their 110 charger/cradle AND power cord. 

2.  Decent range / power - at least the ability to select up to 6w broadcast power.

3.  Standard audio-plug or USB earbud/headset/mic, not the usual model-specific custom hardware.  If not wearing the radio while sailing or if running an outboard, it can be very hard to hear or make calls on handheld marine radios.


--
Dirt

 

It'd be fun to get Bo to attend. He's definitely Coot material. <g> I'll ask him if he'd be interested.

There are a lot of Nav programs out there. I was thinking that part of the day would be more about sharing what we use, not teaching anything specific. A familiarization, at least, class on Navionics sounds like a Good Idea, though. It's cheap, with a free trial, and runs on just about any mobile device. I like the raster nav program I use, OziExplorer, but I also have Navionics loaded on my tablet for some of its handy features. The other day while eating Cobblestone pizza (and garlic rolls <g>) I read in 48 North that the latest version of Navionics supports connection to wifi accessories like AIS receivers and depth sounders.


USB is 5-volts, and many USB ports don't put our much juice. Better to have 12 volt charging and skip the convert-to-5-volts-first step. I think every portable VHF, except maybe the very cheapest, comes with a 12-volt adapier of some sort. A trouble we had on the S100 was that there's no standardization of these adapters and chargers, so everybody has to bring their own...

I'm not convinced the difference between 5 watts and 6 watts in a handheld makes much difference. The main problem with handhelds is the small antenna not very far off the water. It wouldn't make that my top priority when buying a VHF.

Good idea about the earphone jack. I hadn't thought of that.

By the next Salish 100, maybe even by the electronics workshop, Lazy Jack will have a built in VHF radio, but I'll also have a handheld along.

On 12/3/2019 7:15 AM, Thorne wrote:
...
I believe that Bo Neil in Portland (aka "the voice of the Salish 100) is working on a short "How to use your Marine VHF radio" class for the 2020 Salish 100 folks, and might be persuaded to either teach part of your class or attend it for ideas for his own.
...
The Nav program element might be pretty complex and device-specific, or could be easy with everyone saying, "Navionics!" -- ;-)
I'll put my $0.02 in on desired small-boat handheld marine radio features:
1.  Ability to charge via USB, not the usual model-specific 110 charger <-- this was a huge issue on the 2019 Salish 100, for most of the smaller boats had USB battery packs/chargers but not either larger house batteries and inverters or the expensive 30a/125v -> standard plug dock/shore power adapter, assuming they remembered to bring their 110 charger/cradle AND power cord.
2.  Decent range / power - at least the ability to select up to 6w broadcast power.
3.  Standard audio-plug or USB earbud/headset/mic, not the usual model-specific custom hardware.  If not wearing the radio while sailing or if running an outboard, it can be very hard to hear or make calls on handheld marine radios.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
I never made a mistake in my life. I thought I did once, but I was wrong. (Charles Schulz)

 

And a Good Idea it was, Mark. Thanks!

I think there's enough interest in an electronics workshop to start figuring out when and how to do it.

We couldn't get Dan from Almostcanada set up with a Nav program for the trip to Newport for lunch, but did get Earl started with Navionics. Some time later Mary sold him a Samsung tablet much like mine that she didn't like, and I got him set up on Navionics via long-distance. I hope. <g>

On 12/2/2019 3:05 PM, Mark N wrote:
Hi John,
That was me who suggested it.
I figure it would be nice to learn the proper way to talk on the radio, but also to see the features that different radios have and what makes them useful.
Also, I think it would be great to share thoughts and examples of navigation programs, both on PCs and phones. Dan wanted something quick for your Newport float, and I believe he got something okay, but I suspect he (and several of us) would be happy seeing what else is available.
I'd be up for an overnight trip to Toledo to join in on something like this.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
One must have a heart of stone to read the death of Little Nell by Dickens without laughing. (Oscar Wilde)

Dan
 

Yep.  And I even got about 100 miles on it, before putting the boat in for winter overhaul.  I will admit those contour lines obscure everything else and I’d be happier with just a few soundings.  Is that the raster chart you were talking about, John?  I still need to make a mount next to the helm for the tablet.  But, waaaaaay farther down the road since Newport.  Thanks, John.  Dan.

 

Raster charts look just like paper charts. Everything on a raster chart is visible all the time; to get more detail you load a larger scale chart. Navionics uses vector charts. You get more information when you zoom in, and less when you zoom out. There are advantages to each type, but I prefer raster charts most of the time.

You can set Navionics to show fewer contour lines. That's the sort of thing we'd discuss at the electronics workshop.

Maybe you can bring Walkabout to the workshop and combine learning about your gadgets with a winter sea trial. I may take Lazy Jack over.

Speaking of Lazy Jack... She's gonna have some new gadgets soon. Among other things, I'm gonna give her a wifi network to connect other gadgets to my tablet (and Navionics). Bob L may tell me otherwise, but I think that'll be easier than a wired setup...

Speaking of Bob... I think he may have gone to sunnier climes, since we haven't heard from him. I want to find out what date works for him before scheduling the workshop.

Bo Neill has said he'd like to come. :o) Toledo Joe has offered to teach the radio portion. They can work out who does what... <g>

On 12/4/2019 2:07 AM, Dan from Almostcanada wrote:
Yep.  And I even got about 100 miles on it, before putting the boat in for winter overhaul.  I will admit those contour lines obscure everything else and I’d be happier with just a few soundings.  Is that the raster chart you were talking about, John?  I still need to make a mount next to the helm for the tablet.  But, waaaaaay farther down the road since Newport.  Thanks, John.  Dan.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
There is wisdom in turning as often as possible from the familiar to the unfamiliar: it keeps the mind nimble, it kills prejudice, and it fosters humor. (George Santayana)

 

What most Coots need to learn about radio use and etiquette is just enough to successfully communicate, and not sound like an idiot. <g> I don't know how much inbterest there's be in a real class to get certified.

On 12/3/2019 8:22 AM, Case wrote:
For those that hold Merchant Mariners licenses you are required to take a MROP (Marine Radio Operators Permit) certification class. When I took mine many eons ago you had to go the Federal Building in PDX to take the test.
Now there are online courses and exams. Pretty spendy for Coots budgets, but there may be a way to get a group course or find an instructor willing to do a group class. Not sure if or who handles this anymore in Oregon.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
The trouble with the school of experience is that the graduates are too old to go to work. (Henry Ford)

Case Turner
 

When I took the certification that was pretty much all it was. What channels to use or not use. How to call and sign off, etc. general radio etiquette.

Case

Sent from not here

On Dec 4, 2019, at 1:37 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

What most Coots need to learn about radio use and etiquette is just enough to successfully communicate, and not sound like an idiot. <g> I don't know how much inbterest there's be in a real class to get certified.


On 12/3/2019 8:22 AM, Case wrote:
For those that hold Merchant Mariners licenses you are required to take a MROP (Marine Radio Operators Permit) certification class. When I took mine many eons ago you had to go the Federal Building in PDX to take the test.
Now there are online courses and exams. Pretty spendy for Coots budgets, but there may be a way to get a group course or find an instructor willing to do a group class. Not sure if or who handles this anymore in Oregon.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
The trouble with the school of experience is that the graduates are too old to go to work. (Henry Ford)