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Andrew Linn
 

I am building a Chuckanu (Dave Gentry's Chuckanut opened up a bit for more room so it is more like a canoe - because kayaks suck) and I needed some floorboards. I work for a building supply store, and we get 12' long pallets.

I took one home and cut the boards off with a saws-all. I then took a pneumatic nail punch and punched out the heads, easy as pie.

All was good, except these  boards were a hair over 3/4" thick. I was wondering how to get them down to about 3/8".  I could have done the smart thing and ripped them on edge on my table saw. It's mostly safe. Mostly.

However, I have just purchased a used planer/thicknesser. What better way to make skinny boards out of thick boards?

1 1/2 GARBAGE BAGS of shavings later, I have my sticks.

Good news is my planer works. I should probably get new blades.


 

What brand and model of planer, Andy? Congratulations! A thickness planer is an awful handy tool to have around.

My little Delta 12" planer gets clogged up if I don't have it hooked up to my dust collector. It cuts smoother and happier when the shavings get sucked away. It's probably not unique among small planers in that respect.

My Delta has little replaceable, and reversible, blades, but it if you were lucky enough to get a good older planer, or a heavier duty one, it may have blades that can be sharpened. There should be at least one sharpening shop in Capitolopolis.

While you're at the saw shop, they can probably sell you a nice ripping blade for your table saw. ;o)

Maybe pick one up for your skilsaw too. To rip big pieces of pallet into smaller strips that can be more safely, and easily, handled on the table saw.

Have fun, but be careful.

On 11/27/2020 8:01 PM, Andrew wrote:
...
I work for a building supply store, and we get 12' long pallets.
...
All was good, except these  boards were a hair over 3/4" thick. I was wondering how to get them down to about 3/8".  I could have done the smart thing and ripped them on edge on my table saw. It's mostly safe. Mostly.
However, I have just purchased a used planer/thicknesser. What better way to make skinny boards out of thick boards?
1 1/2 GARBAGE BAGS of shavings later, I have my sticks.
Good news is my planer works. I should probably get new blades.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone. (Blaise Pascal)
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Andrew Linn
 

Nothing special, just a Craftsman 12.5" thickness planer, model 21758. 2-blades, one speed, and yeah, it looks like I need to suck the dust away. It's about time I did a collection system.

I've been wanting a planer for a long time - especially now I have near unlimited access to pallet wood.

I'm using circular saw blades on my tablesaw now. Those 7 1/4" blades. Really thin kerf.

On 11/28/2020 2:32 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
What brand and model of planer, Andy? Congratulations! A thickness planer is an awful handy tool to have around.

My little Delta 12" planer gets clogged up if I don't have it hooked up to my dust collector. It cuts smoother and happier when the shavings get sucked away. It's probably not unique among small planers in that respect.

My Delta has little replaceable, and reversible, blades, but it if you were lucky enough to get a good older planer, or a heavier duty one, it may have blades that can be sharpened. There should be at least one sharpening shop in Capitolopolis.

While you're at the saw shop, they can probably sell you a nice ripping blade for your table saw. ;o)

Maybe pick one up for your skilsaw too. To rip big pieces of pallet into smaller strips that can be more safely, and easily, handled on the table saw.

Have fun, but be careful.


 

That's probably about equivalent to my little Taiwanese Delta. Plenty good enough for most of us:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y5gxv2u4

Here's the manual, if you didn't get it:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y5utx2wm

A real dust collector is nice, but a shop vac will work -- now that you've learned your lesson. <g>

People who've tried it tell me that a rip blade works a lot better than a combination blade if you're gonna do a lot of ripping. My saw shop says that Freud blades ain't what they used to be, but they're probably still good:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000225UH/themotherofal-20

Does the building materials place you're working now give you a discount on tools and building materials?

On 11/28/2020 8:50 PM, Andrew wrote:
Nothing special, just a Craftsman 12.5" thickness planer, model 21758. 2-blades, one speed, and yeah, it looks like I need to suck the dust away. It's about time I did a collection system.
I've been wanting a planer for a long time - especially now I have near unlimited access to pallet wood.
I'm using circular saw blades on my tablesaw now. Those 7 1/4" blades. Really thin kerf.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There are two theories to arguing with a woman. Neither works. (Will Rogers)
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Looking at the manual, I see that your planer has reversible blades. If the PO hasn't already used up one edge and reversed them, you may already have a set of "new" blades. But just sucking the chips out of the way may be all you need to do to get the planer cutting better.

On 11/29/2020 1:30 PM, I wrote:
...
Here's the manual, if you didn't get it:
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y5utx2wm
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The greatest analgesic, soporific, stimulant, tranquilizer, narcotic, and to some extent even antibiotic -- in short, the closest thing to a genuine panacea -- known to medical science is work. (Thomas Szasz)
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Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Q: How does one tell a ripping blade from a combination blade by looking at it? I know that other types of rip saws have straighter teeth and bigger gullets. (fewer teeth) . chainsaw... hand saw etc.

I also have a 7-1/4 diablo blade that I've enjoyed for ripping kayak stringers. Very think kerf, 65 thou. 24 tooth. says "framing" on it... think i bought the "cheap one". but i've been quite happy with it.
Perhaps I don't know what i'm missing.
After pushing 10 ft 3/8x1/2 noodles through my table saw in the past I told myself I'd make a long jig and use a skill saw with a good fence next time.

The motor on my Craftsmand 12" bandsaw died this week, it would struggle & humm, but not turn.
I took it off to replace it. Then ran it on the bench, thinking the starter circuit was dead. I got it started by hand "kick starting it" and now it runs just fine. Anyone know why? I also used my shop vac backwards to blow the sawdust out of it and oiled it "occasional use = every 5 yrs" it says.
-Jove


On Mon, Nov 30, 2020 at 1:01 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Looking at the manual, I see that your planer has reversible blades. If
the PO hasn't already used up one edge and reversed them, you may
already have a set of "new" blades. But just sucking the chips out of
the way may be all you need to do to get the planer cutting better.

On 11/29/2020 1:30 PM, I wrote:
> ...
> Here's the manual, if you didn't get it:
>
> https://preview.tinyurl.com/y5utx2wm
> ...
--
John <jkohnen@...>
The greatest analgesic, soporific, stimulant, tranquilizer, narcotic,
and to some extent even antibiotic -- in short, the closest thing to a
genuine panacea -- known to medical science is work. (Thomas Szasz)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com







 

Ripping blades have flat-top teeth, with a greater hook angle. Until Andrew's employer gets tired of him, <g> he's gonna be doing a lot of resawing of those pallet boards. A rip blade will cut faster and easier than a combination blade, and would probably be worth buying for him. Those of us who only occasionally rip long boards will probably stay happy enough with our combination blades.

https://www.rockler.com/learn/choosing-the-right-saw-blade-for-your-project

Cutting big dimension long wood down to manageable size with a handheld saw before heading for the table saw is a Good Idea. A rip blade will help with that, too. On the table saw, use feather boards to hold the wood down and against the fence. It's not only safer, it makes better cuts. These cheapo (but almost twice as expensive as the last time I bought one!) feather boards work pretty good:

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=feather%20board

It's not hard to make wooden ones for when the cheapo HF ones don't fit the job.

On 12/1/2020 5:32 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Q: How does one tell a ripping blade from a combination blade by looking at it? I know that other types of rip saws have straighter teeth and bigger gullets. (fewer teeth) . chainsaw... hand saw etc.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common decency. (H. L. Mencken)
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Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

for - resawing - cutting boards thinner - bandsaws are the tool of choice.
Then, one needs a fairly decent sized bandsaw - and - technique is important.
I saw a youtube recently that speaks to the issue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

the bit about resawing is past the middle of this 35 minute youtube.

Be happy makiing sawdust. - and pretty boards

Gerard Mittelstaedt
McAllen, TX MITTEL48@gmail.com

On Wed, Dec 2, 2020 at 6:58 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Ripping blades have flat-top teeth, with a greater hook angle. Until
Andrew's employer gets tired of him, <g> he's gonna be doing a lot of
resawing of those pallet boards. A rip blade will cut faster and easier
than a combination blade, and would probably be worth buying for him.
Those of us who only occasionally rip long boards will probably stay
happy enough with our combination blades.

https://www.rockler.com/learn/choosing-the-right-saw-blade-for-your-project

Cutting big dimension long wood down to manageable size with a handheld
saw before heading for the table saw is a Good Idea. A rip blade will
help with that, too. On the table saw, use feather boards to hold the
wood down and against the fence. It's not only safer, it makes better
cuts. These cheapo (but almost twice as expensive as the last time I
bought one!) feather boards work pretty good:

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=feather%20board

It's not hard to make wooden ones for when the cheapo HF ones don't fit
the job.

On 12/1/2020 5:32 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Q: How does one tell a ripping blade from a combination blade by looking
at it? I know that other types of rip saws have straighter teeth and
bigger gullets. (fewer teeth) . chainsaw... hand saw etc.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human
existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and
unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common
decency. (H. L. Mencken)


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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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--
Gerard Mittelstaedt -- mittel48@gmail.com
McAllen, Texas
USA


 

That's a good video on setting up your bandsaw. Thanks for sharing it, Gerard. That Carter blade stabilizer sure looks like a dandy gadget for doing scroll cutting, and I really lust after that lever tension release. ;o) Even though he wasn't doing a commercial for his company's products, he did a good job of selling those two gadgets. <g>

https://carterproducts.com/

But instead of spending money, I'll just go out in the shop and tune up my Grizzly bandsaw...

On 12/3/2020 1:03 PM, Gerard M wrote:
for - resawing - cutting boards thinner - bandsaws are the tool of choice.
Then, one needs a fairly decent sized bandsaw - and - technique is important.
I saw a youtube recently that speaks to the issue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU
the bit about resawing is past the middle of this 35 minute youtube.
Be happy makiing sawdust. - and pretty boards
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Patience! Patience! Patience is the invention of dullards and sluggards. In a well-regulated world there should be no need of such a thing as patience. (Grace King)
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Jim Young
 

I agree with you John on both points. My bandsaw gets a tune up today.


On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 7:52 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
That's a good video on setting up your bandsaw. Thanks for sharing it,
Gerard. That Carter blade stabilizer sure looks like a dandy gadget for
doing scroll cutting, and I really lust after that lever tension
release. ;o) Even though he wasn't doing a commercial for his company's
products, he did a good job of selling those two gadgets. <g>

https://carterproducts.com/

But instead of spending money, I'll just go out in the shop and tune up
my Grizzly bandsaw...

On 12/3/2020 1:03 PM, Gerard M wrote:
> for - resawing - cutting boards thinner - bandsaws are the tool of choice.
> Then, one needs a fairly decent sized bandsaw - and - technique is important.
> I saw a youtube recently that speaks to the issue

> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU
>
> the bit about resawing is past the middle of this 35 minute  youtube.
>
> Be happy makiing sawdust. - and pretty boards
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Patience! Patience! Patience is the invention of dullards and sluggards.
In a well-regulated world there should be no need of such a thing as
patience. (Grace King)


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--
Jim Young,
mostly retired
Somers, MT


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

One thing i've noticed on bandsaws guides is that standard vertical bandsaws usually use rub block or bearings, mine uses bronze blocks, and there is a little clearance for the blade to run freely,
on a wood mizer they use bearings on just one side (the top)  and they deflect the blade down slightly, this means there is pressure against the bearings from the blade and that solid bias means the blade is sprung against the bearing at all times........ not floating around between two bearings equally spaced. (see image below)  I think this is a solid concept that could be used more widely on vertical bandsaws too.
I'd probably do a pressure bearing, and then a rub block to stop the blade jumping off if I was cutting a tight curve and pinched the plade.

I resharpened my 4 tooth bandsaw blade with my dremel and a small hard stone bit, it worked great for general use cutting, it would probably drift too much for resawing. Took about 15 minutes, which the way I figure it is saving me money at $80 per hour, if my blades are $20.
image.png

On Sat, Dec 5, 2020 at 7:19 AM Jim Young <somersailing@...> wrote:
I agree with you John on both points. My bandsaw gets a tune up today.

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 7:52 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
That's a good video on setting up your bandsaw. Thanks for sharing it,
Gerard. That Carter blade stabilizer sure looks like a dandy gadget for
doing scroll cutting, and I really lust after that lever tension
release. ;o) Even though he wasn't doing a commercial for his company's
products, he did a good job of selling those two gadgets. <g>

https://carterproducts.com/

But instead of spending money, I'll just go out in the shop and tune up
my Grizzly bandsaw...

On 12/3/2020 1:03 PM, Gerard M wrote:
> for - resawing - cutting boards thinner - bandsaws are the tool of choice.
> Then, one needs a fairly decent sized bandsaw - and - technique is important.
> I saw a youtube recently that speaks to the issue

> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU
>
> the bit about resawing is past the middle of this 35 minute  youtube.
>
> Be happy makiing sawdust. - and pretty boards
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Patience! Patience! Patience is the invention of dullards and sluggards.
In a well-regulated world there should be no need of such a thing as
patience. (Grace King)


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--
Jim Young,
mostly retired
Somers, MT


 

That seems to be sorta the concept of the Carter blade stabilizer. In the video the stabilizer, which replaces the upper guide assembly, springs the blade a bit towards the operator, not to the side like a Wood Mizer, but the tension forces the back of the blade into a slot that keeps it from moving side to side:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

https://carterproducts.com/

On 12/5/2020 2:15 PM, Jove wrote:
One thing i've noticed on bandsaws guides is that standard vertical bandsaws usually use rub block or bearings, mine uses bronze blocks, and there is a little clearance for the blade to run freely,
on a wood mizer they use bearings on just one side (the top)  and they deflect the blade down slightly, this means there is pressure against the bearings from the blade and that solid bias means the blade is sprung against the bearing at all times........ not floating around between two bearings equally spaced. (see image below)  I think this is a solid concept that could be used more widely on vertical bandsaws too.
I'd probably do a pressure bearing, and then a rub block to stop the blade jumping off if I was cutting a tight curve and pinched the plade.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Everyone should believe in something; I believe I'll go fishing. (Henry David Thoreau)
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