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Jove got a bigger boat.


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey John,
yes it is an original 33, from 1972 with the keel-Centerboard.
https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/pearson-33
I used the name 33-1 just to be clear that it is not a 33-2. fin keeler.
She is a 10ft beam (the 33-2 is 11 ft) draft is 4ft or 7ft with the board down.
And yes it does seem to be built a little stouter, the specs say 10930 lb, but she was 13000 on the travel lift. Not sure where that extra 2000 lbs is hiding, or if the travel lift was wrong.
I really like the design, the skeg rudder and enclosed 3 blade prop, I've not been able to find a lot of details online or user groups or the like. Info welcomed on that front.
She's gonna be a little more tender than a deep fin, but we had her out in 20 knots for the trial and she seemed to handle it well with one reef, and 1/3 genoa rolled. I'm thinking she'll need a solent stay and a working gib at some point for high wind pointing.
Here is a video from that day.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/CPoUBS5v8X3U2Gna8

She was repowered at some point with a westerbeke universal diesel 23hp which has ~900hrs on it. She has 4 solar panels, a refrigerator and a composting head, and a forced air diesel heating unit which makes her pretty cozy. New cruising sails main and genoa. There is a windpilot wind vane, which I've always thought was a very cool thing on a cruising boat.
The only complaint I have so far is that the boom is about 5'10, and I'm 6ft. so just the right height to above eye level to catch me unaware, considering a boom brake or other solutions, ideas welcomed.
The varnish is coming off the toe rail, but otherwise she's in quite good shape. There is one hhgh moisture spot in the foredeck noted on the survey, if anyone has ideas of how to care for that. She is balsa cored deck and solid hull. I'm guessing rebedding hardware in that area is a priority.

My plan is to use her as much as possible in the puget sound this season, and bring her down the coast at the end of the season if I've learned enough by then.
She has been registered as "The Toad", "Sun Runner" and "Whimsey", I've named her Trasna Na dTonnta, which is Gealic for "across the waves" and is a song they had us sing in elementary school in Ireland, I like it, but it's a pain in the ass to explain the spelling of at a marina.
She has spent most of her life around the puget sound.


image.png


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

2 images didn't get through it looks like.
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image.png


On Thu, Jan 28, 2021 at 5:05 PM Jove Lachman-Curl via groups.io <jovelc87=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hey John,
yes it is an original 33, from 1972 with the keel-Centerboard.
https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/pearson-33
I used the name 33-1 just to be clear that it is not a 33-2. fin keeler.
She is a 10ft beam (the 33-2 is 11 ft) draft is 4ft or 7ft with the board down.
And yes it does seem to be built a little stouter, the specs say 10930 lb, but she was 13000 on the travel lift. Not sure where that extra 2000 lbs is hiding, or if the travel lift was wrong.
I really like the design, the skeg rudder and enclosed 3 blade prop, I've not been able to find a lot of details online or user groups or the like. Info welcomed on that front.
She's gonna be a little more tender than a deep fin, but we had her out in 20 knots for the trial and she seemed to handle it well with one reef, and 1/3 genoa rolled. I'm thinking she'll need a solent stay and a working gib at some point for high wind pointing.
Here is a video from that day.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/CPoUBS5v8X3U2Gna8

She was repowered at some point with a westerbeke universal diesel 23hp which has ~900hrs on it. She has 4 solar panels, a refrigerator and a composting head, and a forced air diesel heating unit which makes her pretty cozy. New cruising sails main and genoa. There is a windpilot wind vane, which I've always thought was a very cool thing on a cruising boat.
The only complaint I have so far is that the boom is about 5'10, and I'm 6ft. so just the right height to above eye level to catch me unaware, considering a boom brake or other solutions, ideas welcomed.
The varnish is coming off the toe rail, but otherwise she's in quite good shape. There is one hhgh moisture spot in the foredeck noted on the survey, if anyone has ideas of how to care for that. She is balsa cored deck and solid hull. I'm guessing rebedding hardware in that area is a priority.

My plan is to use her as much as possible in the puget sound this season, and bring her down the coast at the end of the season if I've learned enough by then.
She has been registered as "The Toad", "Sun Runner" and "Whimsey", I've named her Trasna Na dTonnta, which is Gealic for "across the waves" and is a song they had us sing in elementary school in Ireland, I like it, but it's a pain in the ass to explain the spelling of at a marina.
She has spent most of her life around the puget sound.
image.png
image.png
image.png


Brandon
 

Got'a love big boats with long legs. I'm a big fan of oar and sail boats. I think they are about as pure and righteous as a sailor can get. But a warm dry bunk in a boat that can easily make 125nm a day is hard to beat. Congrats Jove. I'm on E dock in Swantown. I'm sure you've already figured out that Westbay, while somewhat charming in its own way, has a little too much character for some including the Admiral of Oceanus. Swantown is clean, well maintained and run. The rules are pretty strict, but I like that in a marina. We found out first hand what a nightmare a marina that lets tennents get away with almost anything. When we were in Newport (I'm not making any of this up) heroin-addicted prostitute with a pitbull towed her POS boat a few slips down from us at Newport Marina. Regular visits from Newport PD were a welcome distraction from the constant parade of low-lifes who wondered the docks sniffing around her, the whore, not the pitbull. I still have bad dreams about that whole mess.

I love Pearsons. My editor at Good Old Boat, Dan Spurr, calls them the brickshithouse with sails. the last big boat I had before getting Oceanus was a Pearson Renegade 27 feet long. It was a great boat. While I love Columbia 43s obviously, I wish Columbia built their boats as well as Pearson did.

Virginia and I built a small apartment above my son's garage in Longview. It's warm and has indoor plumbing so we are living in it during the winter. I am on the boat most Thursdays when my wife is playing piano for a voice teacher in Olympia. As the weather gets better we will spend more time on the boat. I have to say it's not a lot of fun living on a boat during the winter in the Northwet. 

Brandon
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43
Olympia



David Graybeal
 

Nice find, indeed!


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for the infor Brandon,
I was thinking about moving my boat down to Newport at the end of the summer, but it sounds like I'll have to look into that a little deeper. Any nice spots on the oregon coast you'd recommend?
I elected to register the boat in Oregon and get the WA cruising permit, which means if I stay in WA into next winter I'll have to pay state sales tax on the boat. But I could live with that if I get settled into Olympia.
West bay is "eclectic" as one person we spoke to diplomatically put it. We'll see how it goes, and I'm on the list for SwanTown so that should come up in 2-4 months.
I don't have much experience with boats this size to say how stoutly built it is, It seems stout, but I perhaps less stout than earlier Pearsons, the Pearson Vanguards, Tritons, and Albergs that were built by Pearson Yachts.
A reputation for solid build is reassuring.
-Jove



On Fri, Jan 29, 2021 at 9:47 AM Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Got'a love big boats with long legs. I'm a big fan of oar and sail boats. I think they are about as pure and righteous as a sailor can get. But a warm dry bunk in a boat that can easily make 125nm a day is hard to beat. Congrats Jove. I'm on E dock in Swantown. I'm sure you've already figured out that Westbay, while somewhat charming in its own way, has a little too much character for some including the Admiral of Oceanus. Swantown is clean, well maintained and run. The rules are pretty strict, but I like that in a marina. We found out first hand what a nightmare a marina that lets tennents get away with almost anything. When we were in Newport (I'm not making any of this up) heroin-addicted prostitute with a pitbull towed her POS boat a few slips down from us at Newport Marina. Regular visits from Newport PD were a welcome distraction from the constant parade of low-lifes who wondered the docks sniffing around her, the whore, not the pitbull. I still have bad dreams about that whole mess.

I love Pearsons. My editor at Good Old Boat, Dan Spurr, calls them the brickshithouse with sails. the last big boat I had before getting Oceanus was a Pearson Renegade 27 feet long. It was a great boat. While I love Columbia 43s obviously, I wish Columbia built their boats as well as Pearson did.

Virginia and I built a small apartment above my son's garage in Longview. It's warm and has indoor plumbing so we are living in it during the winter. I am on the boat most Thursdays when my wife is playing piano for a voice teacher in Olympia. As the weather gets better we will spend more time on the boat. I have to say it's not a lot of fun living on a boat during the winter in the Northwet. 

Brandon
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43
Olympia



 

A probably more civilized option in Newport is the Embarcadero, though they did let Earl moor Dr. Petra there last year. <g> Toledo is pretty far upriver for doing any casual sailing...

Before the oil crises in the '70s Polyester resin was cheap, so a lot of fiberglass boatbuilders built pretty stout boats. Especially after the second crisis in '79 builders started finding ways to use less resin, or just skimped on it...

Your '72 Pearson was built back when nobody dreamed that oil, and resins made from it, would ever get expensive. :o)

On 1/29/2021 11:40 AM, Jove wrote:
Thanks for the infor Brandon,
I was thinking about moving my boat down to Newport at the end of the summer, but it sounds like I'll have to look into that a little deeper. Any nice spots on the oregon coast you'd recommend?
...
I don't have much experience with boats this size to say how stoutly built it is, It seems stout, but I perhaps less stout than earlier Pearsons, the Pearson Vanguards, Tritons, and Albergs that were built by Pearson Yachts.
A reputation for solid build is reassuring.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It's jolted by every pebble on the road. (Henry Ward Beecher)
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Brandon
 

The Cruising permit sounds like a good way to go. I had to pay sales tax on Oceanus when we moved her to Olympia. We have Washington DL now, so If I got pulled over by Harbor Patrol I'd be dead meat. I don't know what the fine would be, but I'm guessing a lot.

The Problem with moving the boat to the Oregon Coast is there's no place to go. In Olympia there are 40 or so marine state parks and dozens of other anchorages within a couple of hours sail. You can be in the San Juans or Canada in an easy two-day sail. If you're in Newport... not so much. Sailing around in the bay gets old quick.

Brandon


 

If you bring a boat south from Washington, it's hard to get it back up there again. During the summer months the wind is normally from the north, and very often blows pretty hard. In the winter, southerly winds are common, but often part of a storm. <g> Of course you can usually find favorable winds to get from here to there in the summer by way of Hawaii. ;o)

Coos Bay is a bigger bay to sail around in, but keep to the channels. The "back lot" docks at Charleston are where the troublesome people live. The docks facing South Slough are more civilized. None of the docks have gates.

On 1/30/2021 7:33 AM, Brandon F wrote:
The Cruising permit sounds like a good way to go. I had to pay sales tax on Oceanus when we moved her to Olympia. We have Washington DL now, so If I got pulled over by Harbor Patrol I'd be dead meat. I don't know what the fine would be, but I'm guessing a lot.
The Problem with moving the boat to the Oregon Coast is there's no place to go. In Olympia there are 40 or so marine state parks and dozens of other anchorages within a couple of hours sail. You can be in the San Juans or Canada in an easy two-day sail. If you're in Newport... not so much. Sailing around in the bay gets old quick.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field. (Niels Bohr)
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Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and the weather is often stormy.
I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a chapter.
Hawaii sounds ok.
We'll see how it goes.
I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this mailing list recently.
Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to that.

-Jove


On Sat, Jan 30, 2021 at 1:41 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
If you bring a boat south from Washington, it's hard to get it back up
there again. During the summer months the wind is normally from the
north, and very often blows pretty hard. In the winter, southerly winds
are common, but often part of a storm. <g> Of course you can usually
find favorable winds to get from here to there in the summer by way of
Hawaii. ;o)

Coos Bay is a bigger bay to sail around in, but keep to the channels.
The "back lot" docks at Charleston are where the troublesome people
live. The docks facing South Slough are more civilized. None of the
docks have gates.

On 1/30/2021 7:33 AM, Brandon F wrote:
> The Cruising permit sounds like a good way to go. I had to pay sales tax
> on Oceanus when we moved her to Olympia. We have Washington DL now, so
> If I got pulled over by Harbor Patrol I'd be dead meat. I don't know
> what the fine would be, but I'm guessing a lot.
>
> The Problem with moving the boat to the Oregon Coast is there's no place
> to go. In Olympia there are 40 or so marine state parks and dozens of
> other anchorages within a couple of hours sail. You can be in the San
> Juans or Canada in an easy two-day sail. If you're in Newport... not so
> much. Sailing around in the bay gets old quick.
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a
very narrow field. (Niels Bohr)


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Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and the weather is often stormy.
I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a chapter.
Hawaii sounds ok.
We'll see how it goes.
I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this mailing list recently.
Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to that.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


--
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Andrew Linn
 

I was just about to ask if anyone heard from you after your trip.  Looking forward to your write up. 

On Feb 10, 2021 3:18 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:
Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


--
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I'm glad the trip to Olympia went well, Jove. I too am eager to read your report on the adventure.

I've heard of something like that, but the term "Solent stay" didn't ring a bell. But I don't recall what else they might have been called... Seems like a good idea for a cruiser with a roller furling jib. You'll have to unfasten it when using the Genoa

I've been toying with the idea of something like that for Tuffy, so I can use different jibs without having to climb out on that tiny foredeck. One of my ideas is to use high-tech low-stretch line for the jib halyard, and the same line for a tack downhaul leading back to near the cockpit. The jibs would have wire of low-stretch line in their luffs. I've got a cute little bronze winch that could set the halyard, or downhaul, up tight enough so the whole works takes the strain off the headstay, acting as an "acting" headstay and, hopefully, keeping the jib luff tight enough. To change jibs, I'd slack the downhaul and halyard, pull the sail back to the cockpit, and swap sails. When I go get Tuffy's mainsail back from Kendall I should ask him of I'm crazy. <g>

But this year I'll just try to be happy with the little jib, and the newly loose-footed mainsail. :o)

On 2/10/2021 3:18 PM, Jove wrote:
Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.
The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")
--
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https://www.avg.com


Richard Green
 

Glad the trip went well, will there be a book in the offing?  Short but sweet?  

When I sailed Passage in the higher winds of the Astoria reach I had a taste too much weather helm shortening sails notwithstanding so when I pulled the boat to redo the ridiculously small vee berth I redesigned the bow extending it on a teak layered sprit 12” which proved to be just right for my sails and hull.  To shorten this too long story, I added a baby stay from the spreaders/sidestays area to a new fitting I had cast in bronze (when it was a local event) and mounted to the reinforced area spanning the anchor locker bulkhead.  While I left if up all the time, the only interference was when I was tacking the genny and it would sort of slide through the approximate three foot gap.  I had the baby stays’l, about 55 sq ft, on all the time as occasionally winds in the fifty mph range would spring up out of Young’s Bay and with no engine ever I had to be prepared.  In the photo sailing, the wind is 35 mph as measured on the boat taking the photo.  This was behind Tongue Point exiting the bay so no fetch for waves to speak of.  Boat balance beautifully with double reef main and stays’l.  In the odd fifty mph, I sailed stays’l only and was a happy camper.  

Rich



On Feb 10, 2021, at 3:18 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:

Hey John,
A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back stays.
It may have other names.
Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the other thread later.
-Jove

On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 2:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Here's an entertaining way to get a Big Picture of what the wind is doing:

https://earth.nullschool.net/

Solent stay?

On 1/30/2021 6:23 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, I am becoming quite familiar with this predicament. Northerly winds
> in the summer, Southerly in the winter, but winter winds are cold and
> the weather is often stormy.
> I went around the whole trailerable/non-trailerable boat thing for a
> while, and at this point I want to try out the bigger boat stuff for a
> chapter.
> Hawaii sounds ok.
> We'll see how it goes.
> I'm also realizing that the daily sea winds in the strait of Juan de
> fuca can be a pretty good challenge. "wind river" was mentioned on this
> mailing list recently.
> Beating to windward is where I'll really need a smaller tighter
> headsail, and that idea of a solent stay will probably be the answer to
> that.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the
absence of power. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


--
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https://www.avg.com








Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the mast head.
Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.

image.png


On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 9:27 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'm glad the trip to Olympia went well, Jove. I too am eager to read
your report on the adventure.

I've heard of something like that, but the term "Solent stay" didn't
ring a bell. But I don't recall what else they might have been called...
Seems like a good idea for a cruiser with a roller furling jib. You'll
have to unfasten it when using the Genoa

I've been toying with the idea of something like that for Tuffy, so I
can use different jibs without having to climb out on that tiny
foredeck. One of my ideas is to use high-tech low-stretch line for the
jib halyard, and the same line for a tack downhaul leading back to near
the cockpit. The jibs would have wire of low-stretch line in their
luffs. I've got a cute little bronze winch that could set the halyard,
or downhaul, up tight enough so the whole works takes the strain off the
headstay, acting as an "acting" headstay and, hopefully, keeping the jib
luff tight enough. To change jibs, I'd slack the downhaul and halyard,
pull the sail back to the cockpit, and swap sails. When I go get Tuffy's
mainsail back from Kendall I should ask him of I'm crazy. <g>

But this year I'll just try to be happy with the little jib, and the
newly loose-footed mainsail. :o)

On 2/10/2021 3:18 PM, Jove wrote:
> Hey John,
> A solent stay is a stay about 6-13 inches inside your head stay, It's
> usually removable and can be disconnected from the deck ant stowed
> against the mast, Allows you to put a storm jip or working jib on a
> sloop without removing the Genoa from the furler. some of the benefits
> of the sail handling advantages of a cutter without adding running back
> stays.
> It may have other names.
> Just an idea I'll play with as I get to know the boat.
>
> The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, I'll write an update on the
> other thread later.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if
they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis
Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")


--
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https://www.avg.com







Brandon
 

Jove,

It depends on how and where you are going to use the boat, whether a Solent stay makes sense. I haven't seen any on boats in Puget Sound. That probably because when the sun is out and people feel like going out in a boat there is almost never wind. The chances of getting "caught out in a blow" in the Sound are slim to none. If you have longer range asperations (like sailing to England and in the Solent) then it might make sense. I'd spend my money on an asymmetrical or cruising spinnaker.

Oceanus is rigged as a sloop but has provision for a staysail with a wire luff that is shackled to a deck fitting and then hoisted by a wire halyard to hounds that are four or five feet above the spreaders. I've got a storm staysail that I like a lot and a light-air "reaching" staysail that can go under a spinnaker or fly on the opposite side of the genny. We had really light winds from astern for three days on our crossing to Hawaii. The main was banging around, so I dropped it and we sailed with a polled out genny to starboard and the reaching staysail on the other side. Worked great even with the Hydrovane steering. And it was quiet enough that we could sleep.

Brandon
Olympia and Longview, Wash.



Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks Brandon. good advice for the sound.
Those soft shackles look pretty good.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 12:19 PM Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Jove,

It depends on how and where you are going to use the boat, whether a Solent stay makes sense. I haven't seen any on boats in Puget Sound. That probably because when the sun is out and people feel like going out in a boat there is almost never wind. The chances of getting "caught out in a blow" in the Sound are slim to none. If you have longer range asperations (like sailing to England and in the Solent) then it might make sense. I'd spend my money on an asymmetrical or cruising spinnaker.

Oceanus is rigged as a sloop but has provision for a staysail with a wire luff that is shackled to a deck fitting and then hoisted by a wire halyard to hounds that are four or five feet above the spreaders. I've got a storm staysail that I like a lot and a light-air "reaching" staysail that can go under a spinnaker or fly on the opposite side of the genny. We had really light winds from astern for three days on our crossing to Hawaii. The main was banging around, so I dropped it and we sailed with a polled out genny to starboard and the reaching staysail on the other side. Worked great even with the Hydrovane steering. And it was quiet enough that we could sleep.

Brandon
Olympia and Longview, Wash.



 

Brandon's description of how his heavy weather staysail is rigged makes me think that my ideas for jib handling on Tuffy aren't completely crazy. Although I'll never be taking her to sea, it's common to have light winds on Fern Ridge early in the day, strong winds in the afternoon, and light winds again in the evening, so being able to easily switch between big and little jibs would be useful.

Brandon taught some of us Coots how to make those soft shackles:

https://flic.kr/s/aHskedS5ar

On 2/11/2021 1:53 PM, Jove wrote:
Thanks Brandon. good advice for the sound.
Those soft shackles look pretty good.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
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The logical progression leads to the really fast sailing vessels/vehicles having a single sail, like iceboats and speed record boats:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/fej94x9w

or

https://www.cnn.com/videos/sports/2017/06/09/paul-larsen-sailing-speed-record-vestas-sailrocket-americas-cup-mainsail-orig.cnn

On 2/11/2021 10:07 AM, Jove wrote:
Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the mast head.
Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Winter blues are cured every time with a potato gratin paired with a roast chicken. (Alexandra Guarnaschelli)
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Jove Lachman-Curl
 

  I guess, for the same reasons we don't see biplanes much anymore.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 4:30 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
The logical progression leads to the really fast sailing
vessels/vehicles having a single sail, like iceboats and speed record boats:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/fej94x9w

or

https://www.cnn.com/videos/sports/2017/06/09/paul-larsen-sailing-speed-record-vestas-sailrocket-americas-cup-mainsail-orig.cnn

On 2/11/2021 10:07 AM, Jove wrote:
> Thanks Rich, interesting stuff.
> It seems from my experience and what I've read you can often point
> higher with a smaller jib. There is probably a wind speed or boat speed
> above which the big genoa is giving more windage than speed.
> You'll notice that a lot of race boats have smaller gibs that don't go
> full height, The new AC36 foil boats have a half height gib, and look
> like a fractional, even though they have the head stay running to the
> mast head.
> Of course they are a totally different kettle of fish, with double
> surface wing sails etc,  but the principles apply I think.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Winter blues are  cured every time with a potato gratin paired with a
roast chicken. (Alexandra Guarnaschelli)


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