Topics

John's Classic 12


Ken Preston
 

This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand new Classic 12 is doing?  First as regards handling on shore. . .is it really that light??  Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water?  I don't recall, did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material?   Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)?  I guess I'm clumsy enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
Thanks for your great albums! 
Ken P.


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

I'm very interested to hear from John also.
I built a 18"x22" kayak (too narrow for me honestly) It ended up under 28 lbs. Which is wonderful, I want to build another one but think I'd go for 15'x24", similar to my 1980s glass edyline which I very much enjoy.
I can't speak to durability. But I've heard good things about the abrasion resistance of the 2 part rubbery polyurethane coatings the SOF kayak guys recommend.
I bet you could also sew on 2mm plastic sheets in the rug/strike areas. Just a thought.
-Jove

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 7:56 AM Ken Preston <kenpreston46@...> wrote:
This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand new Classic 12 is doing?  First as regards handling on shore. . .is it really that light??  Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water?  I don't recall, did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material?   Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)?  I guess I'm clumsy enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
Thanks for your great albums! 
Ken P.


 

Sorry for the tardy reply. I've been under the weather and uninclined to get my brain organixed enough to write... Better now.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've only had Whimsy out once since I got her. That outing demonstrated that even though she is indeed light, she's awkward to load and unload using an unmodified Quick-N-Easy roof rack on the canopy of my 2006 Tacoma. The boat is 12' long and 4' wide, and manhandling her risks odd muscle strains and back kinks for an out of shape Ol' Coot. Alas, I've procrastinated about doing what's necessary to set up the roof rack, and to rig up a little dolly to make moving Whimsy around easier. Also making a good way to store her. Right now she's inside Pickle; not an ideal situation for either boat..

Whimsy is indeed a Good Boat once in the water. She rows easily even with the clubs I've got for oars. (When's Toledo Joe gonna show us how to make good oars? <g>). I've only had her out in flat water, but I suspect she'd do well in a chop. She tracks really, really well; perhaps even to a fault for an oarsman who likes a lively, maneuverable boat, but a great help to a poor rower like myself. <g>

We used the light Dacron. I haven't run into anything sharp yet, so I can't say if that was a wise choice. If you're gonna be grounding on sharp rocks and barnacles, sacrificing some lightness by uisng the 9 oz. cloth might be worth it. Dave Gentry has used PL Premium polyurethane construction adhesive as a filler coat on the Dacron for better durability. Gentry's boats are heavier than Platt Monfort's, but simpler to build. The Toledo Boathouse built a bunch of them when Andrew was in charge.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

There's a little Yaquina canoe (Gentry style construction) that was built years ago at the Toledo Boathouse that's been knocked about --
though no barnacles -- in the boat livery and is still usable, though getting a bit worn. Dacron covered SoF boats hold up darn good.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6ZpA

The Retired Old Geezers did a Good Job building Whimsy, but there's some slack in some of the Kevlar reinforcement straps. That doesn't seem to be causing any problems. Yet. <g> If you build a Geodesic Airolite boat, be sure to leave tails on the Kevlar above the gunnels so you can tighten the straps after you've shrunk the fabric. Cut the excess off after you install the rubrails.

The frame is hard to paint by hand, because it's complex, with lots of little surfaces and corners. The ROGs finally had the shipyard spray paint Whimsy's. An oil finish that you can liberally slap on without worrying about drips and runs might be the best choice if you don't have a spray gun.

On 9/27/2020 7:56 AM, Ken P wrote:
This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand new Classic 12 is doing?  First as regards handling on shore. . .is it really that light??  Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water?  I don't recall, did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material?  Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)?  I guess I'm clumsy enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
Thanks for your great albums!

--
John <@Jkohnen>
It is a great art to saunter. (Henry David Thoreau)
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Ken Preston
 

Hello John,and thanks very much for your input.  I particularly sympathize with your trouble getting even a light if very awkward load up on top of a vehicle.  My no-longer quite new strip canoe tried to eat me alive when I approached my pickup rack with it.  I decided I wasn't ever going to use the boat if I had to go through that any more (I essentially always go alone, so can't believably count on help loading and unloading, especially for frequent but short trips).  I bought a "truck bed extender" which looks like it ought to be illegal but works really well.  It goes into a 2" trailer hitch receiver and is rated at 300 pounds load. . .with a 65 pound canoe, I'm well within the load limits and the boat is always at or below waist level.  It's also sticking something like 8 feet behind the truck. . .so I got the biggest brightest fluorescent orange flag I could find and fly it from the stern on the road.  So far no problems with the police. . .and I'm getting a lot of time on the water.  I've made a series of wheel sets for various boats, and that of course is essential. . .put wheels under one end of the boat and only have to carry the other end yourself.  The wheels are 12" lawnmower wheels that take a 1/2" rod for an axle, but I have my eyes open for a set of "sand wheels". . .we shall see.  What I have is working!
Thanks again,
Ken


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ken, that's a great idea, thanks for sharing.
I am a strong and fairly young coot, 34, 200lbs, and my back is almost always good. But even so there are days I really don't want to lift even my 50lb glass kayaks onto the roof of my nice low corolla.
There are times I'm more in the mood for a gentle walk, but would prefer to paddle. I know several older women who really can't handle any of the boats that are widely available, since they are small and light boned. I sympathise with them and the lack of availability of good solutions. Thanks for sharing this one.
I often think about how wider availability of SOF technology could help too.
-Jove

On Tue, Oct 6, 2020 at 8:11 AM Ken Preston <kenpreston46@...> wrote:
Hello John,and thanks very much for your input.  I particularly sympathize with your trouble getting even a light if very awkward load up on top of a vehicle.  My no-longer quite new strip canoe tried to eat me alive when I approached my pickup rack with it.  I decided I wasn't ever going to use the boat if I had to go through that any more (I essentially always go alone, so can't believably count on help loading and unloading, especially for frequent but short trips).  I bought a "truck bed extender" which looks like it ought to be illegal but works really well.  It goes into a 2" trailer hitch receiver and is rated at 300 pounds load. . .with a 65 pound canoe, I'm well within the load limits and the boat is always at or below waist level.  It's also sticking something like 8 feet behind the truck. . .so I got the biggest brightest fluorescent orange flag I could find and fly it from the stern on the road.  So far no problems with the police. . .and I'm getting a lot of time on the water.  I've made a series of wheel sets for various boats, and that of course is essential. . .put wheels under one end of the boat and only have to carry the other end yourself.  The wheels are 12" lawnmower wheels that take a 1/2" rod for an axle, but I have my eyes open for a set of "sand wheels". . .we shall see.  What I have is working!
Thanks again,
Ken


Bob Miller
 

I've used this to load several boats including a Klepper Aerius II and ab 8' Oughtred 8' cedar strip dinghy. Guides are adjustable.

Bob M

On Fri, Oct 2, 2020 at 1:54 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Sorry for the tardy reply. I've been under the weather and uninclined to
get my brain organixed enough to write... Better now.

I'm ashamed to admit that I've only had Whimsy out once since I got her.
That outing demonstrated that even though she is indeed light, she's
awkward to load and unload using an unmodified Quick-N-Easy roof rack on
the canopy of my 2006 Tacoma. The boat is 12' long and 4' wide, and
manhandling her risks odd muscle strains and back kinks for an out of
shape Ol' Coot. Alas, I've procrastinated about doing what's necessary
to set up the roof rack, and to rig up a little dolly to make moving
Whimsy around easier. Also making a good way to store her. Right now
she's inside Pickle; not an ideal situation for either boat..

Whimsy is indeed a Good Boat once in the water. She rows easily even
with the clubs I've got for oars. (When's Toledo Joe gonna show us how
to make good oars? <g>). I've only had her out in flat water, but I
suspect she'd do well in a chop. She tracks really, really well; perhaps
even to a fault for an oarsman who likes a lively, maneuverable boat,
but a great help to a poor rower like myself. <g>

We used the light Dacron. I haven't run into anything sharp yet, so I
can't say if that was a wise choice. If you're gonna be grounding on
sharp rocks and barnacles, sacrificing some lightness by uisng the 9 oz.
cloth might be worth it. Dave Gentry has used PL Premium polyurethane
construction adhesive as a filler coat on the Dacron for better
durability. Gentry's boats are heavier than Platt Monfort's, but simpler
to build. The Toledo Boathouse built a bunch of them when Andrew was in
charge.

http://gentrycustomboats.com/

There's a little Yaquina canoe (Gentry style construction) that was
built years ago at the Toledo Boathouse that's been knocked about --
though no barnacles -- in the boat livery and is still usable, though
getting a bit worn. Dacron covered SoF boats hold up darn good.

https://flic.kr/p/fE6ZpA

The Retired Old Geezers did a Good Job building Whimsy, but there's some
slack in some of the Kevlar reinforcement straps. That doesn't seem to
be causing any problems. Yet. <g> If you build a Geodesic Airolite boat,
be sure to leave tails on the Kevlar above the gunnels so you can
tighten the straps after you've shrunk the fabric. Cut the excess off
after you install the rubrails.

The frame is hard to paint by hand, because it's complex, with lots of
little surfaces and corners. The ROGs finally had the shipyard spray
paint Whimsy's. An oil finish that you can liberally slap on without
worrying about drips and runs might be the best choice if you don't have
a spray gun.

On 9/27/2020 7:56 AM, Ken P wrote:
> This is particularly for John K., but anybody else with relevant
> experience with SOF boats, please speak up!
> I'm thinking hard about this coming winter and the huge space in my shop
> since my best friend's Caledonia Yawl isn't in there any more. . .and
> I've noticed lately that my canoe-rowboat is getting heavier and heavier
> these days. . .so could I ask for a report on how the no longer brand
> new Classic 12 is doing?  First as regards handling on shore. . .is it
> really that light??  Then in the water. . .I don't doubt it rows really
> well on the flat, have you had it in any rougher water?  I don't recall,
> did you use the 9 ounce fabric or the original lighter material? 
>   Either way, have you had any damage yet (I don't like to look at the
> scratches on the bottom of my canoe. . .sigh)?  I guess I'm clumsy
> enough now that I let the boat ground at least lightly before clambering
> out these days, which, on the barnacles and cobbles beach where I
> launch. . .is only nice around high tide!
> Anyway, your boat is surely pretty enough, how is it working for you?
> Thanks for your great albums!


--
John <jkohnen@...>
It is a great art to saunter. (Henry David Thoreau)


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