Topics

Float plan, Everett to Olympia


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png


Jamie Orr
 

Hi Jove,

I don't know Tacoma Narrows, but we have a few narrows up here in BC, for example Seymour Narrows near Campbell River.  What I have been told, and what I did, was to start through near the end of the unfavourable tide.  The slight current against you will give you more steerage while your speed over ground is less, so you have better control.  Once through, the now favourable current will speed you on your way, and incidentally make sure you don't get swept through backwards should you lose power after the change.

If you are going south, I imagine the tide will ebb north, so I would start through in the last few minutes of the ebb.  Once through, the new flood should then help you in travelling south.

I make no claim to being expert, so run that past someone who has traversed Tacoma Narrows, and/or consult your Waggoner cruising guide - they put in lots of good tips.

Cheers,

Jamie


Andrew Linn
 

Greg and I did most of that run backwards - I mean the other way - back in 2012. We went from Tacoma up around point. We motored almost all the way, maintaining speed pretty easy. There was very little wind on our trip.

30 miles a day? I hope you are planning on not turning on the engine unless you are about to run aground. With a crew of 3, and motoring at an average of 4kts, you should be able to do the whole trip in 24 hours. 30 miles a day? You can do that in a PDR.  It ain't fun, but . . .

If you do get to moving faster than you planned for, I hope you spend the extra time sailing. Gunkhole and take all the alternative routes you can - anyone can sail the ship channel. Do a few man overboard drills. Time on the water is worth it's weight in gold.*

http://andrewlinn.com/2012/120830_boatmove/index.htm

*I'm working on mixing my metaphors.

On 2/4/2021 6:11 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks for the tips Andrew, I'll give you call tomorrow and pick your brain.
Is there any time that works best for you?

30 miles a day is just to avoid sailing at night, and to keep the trip interesting and mellow.
I don't want to push my luck with a new boat and new crew.
But I'm open to changing my ideas about all of it. The more advice the better.
I was hoping to have a nice clear weather window Fri-Monday, but it shifted on me. So we'll see.
-Jove


On Thu, Feb 4, 2021 at 8:46 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
Greg and I did most of that run backwards - I mean the other way - back
in 2012. We went from Tacoma up around point. We motored almost all the
way, maintaining speed pretty easy. There was very little wind on our trip.

30 miles a day? I hope you are planning on not turning on the engine
unless you are about to run aground. With a crew of 3, and motoring at
an average of 4kts, you should be able to do the whole trip in 24 hours.
30 miles a day? You can do that in a PDR.  It ain't fun, but . . .

If you do get to moving faster than you planned for, I hope you spend
the extra time sailing. Gunkhole and take all the alternative routes you
can - anyone can sail the ship channel. Do a few man overboard drills.
Time on the water is worth it's weight in gold.*

http://andrewlinn.com/2012/120830_boatmove/index.htm

*I'm working on mixing my metaphors.

On 2/4/2021 6:11 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
> Hey guys,
> I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
> I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.
>
> WEATHER
> Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to
> move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
> Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
> Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium
> winds and light rain.
>
>







 

On the Salish 100, Marty told us that the current in Colvos Passage always flows north, no matter what the stage of the tide. As Billy Holiday just sang to me, it's "funny that way". <g>

Now the stars are falling on Alabama... Glad I'm here in Oregon.

On February 4, 2021 6:11:58 PM PST, Jove wrote:
Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers.
...

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?
...
--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.


Pete Leenhouts
 

Jove, I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions. The Waggoner Guide is a great place to start. 

I'd suggest Port Madison as your first anchorage overnight. It's quiet at this time of year. You'll find good anchorage when you go in past the second yacht club piers on the south shore. You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W

I used Navionics in and out of Port Madison for five years 2015-2020 when my boat was berthed there, and always found it very accurate. (I use it on my IPAD-4, so the screen will be a bit bigger than a phone). I used to moor my boat (5 foot draft) at the "T" pier just west of Treasure Island, which is the island immediately north of the location I suggested above. Even at the lowest tides, minus 3(!) I had room under the boat.   

Entry Port Madison is easy; it's on a south leg, with good water on both sides. Your Navionics will show you the mudflats on either side. I always stayed in the deepest part shown; never saw less than 15 feet.  

The next leg is to the southwest, with plenty of good water to the south as you pass the Seattle Yacht Club outstation (the first of the two yacht club moorages on the south side with good water right up to the piers). Mind the mooring balls all over the place; you may find you'll have to work your way through a couple of them in the fairway. Stay a little south of the southwest leg if you have to, you'll find good water there. 

The next leg is more to the west southwest as you pass the Bainbridge Yacht Club piers and enter the area I'd suggest you consider for anchorage. 

You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W  

If you need to get ashore, there is an unmarked public access point just east of that "T" pier at the end of Skogen Lane at 47-41 54.36 N ,  122 32 12.42 W. On google maps, you will see a small skiff laying on the mud flat just offshore in that location. Note the daymark between the skiff's location and the suggested anchorage, which marks a big rock. 

There are no public landings, bathrooms or facilities in Port Madison that I know of, but it is quiet and I doubt you'll be disturbed in any safe anchorage. 

I have used this tide and current predictor for the past seven years and found it generally accurate for the area on the west side of the Sound from Port Townsend to Gig Harbor. Pay attention to the extensive mudflats on the west and north side of the dogleg as you enter, as well as cross-currents

This is the Port Madison page; these are highs and lows (I stripped out sunrise and other similar data) (use at your own risk of course). With the lower of the two lows in the minus range, you'll still find good holding ground in the area I suggested. And, you'll find that even in high winds, Port Madison is extremely well protected.     
021-02-07  02:52 PST  10.41 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  07:11 PST   8.19 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-07  12:18 PST  11.11 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  19:33 PST  -1.02 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-08  03:54 PST  11.33 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  08:37 PST   8.09 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-08  13:20 PST  10.89 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  20:27 PST  -1.50 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  04:39 PST  11.93 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  09:38 PST   7.63 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  14:21 PST  10.78 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  21:16 PST  -1.73 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-10  05:17 PST  12.24 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  10:26 PST   7.05 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-10  15:17 PST  10.73 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  22:02 PST  -1.69 feet  Low Tide 
Shipping: I use the Marine Radar app on my phone to monitor shipping, and have found it accurate. 
Pay attention to shipping if you pass anywhere near Point No Point; the container and bulk transport ships drag big wakes (VERY big wakes) and the rapidly shoaling water as you approach the point means that the wake can build up to surprising heights in a very short period of time. In fact, I'd wait north of Point No Point to let a big guy pass and to let the wake, which you can easily see), pass you. Avoid Point No Point at periods of highest currents, as the rip just off the point is extensive.      

Look at your charts carefully as you pass south of Point No Point, as rips form along the shoaling water. They're marked on the chart. Kingston is said to be good once inside the breakwater, but that's a ferry landing and noisy, and the anchorage just south of the breakwater is pretty rough.  I use the Washington Department of Transportation ferry schedules to stay out of the way of the Kingston-Edmonds ferry (which run at 18-22 knots) but have not found their wake excessive. This is the Kingston-Edmonds schedule

Port Madison Bay can be bumpy, as it is open to the southeast and north west. I've seen boats anchored off Indianola in the northwest corner, but haven't done so myself. You may find some small craft traffic while you head over towards Port Madison harbor, they're coming or going towards Agate Pass on the southwest end of the big bay.  

Tacoma is a major port, so you'll find shipping traffic all the way down there. I like to transit west of Vashon despite the current (no traffic except an occasional tug and barge). 

Best wishes for a safe and enjoyable passage!  

Pete Leenhouts
Port Ludlow WA
MV RIPTIDE 

      




-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 4, 2021 6:11 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png
image.png


Brandon
 

Jove,

Just a suggestion on the second night. Unless you like crowded Gig Harbor or have a reason to go there, you might think about Quartermaster harbor on Vashon, very snug with a nice state parks moorage or a little maina at Burton. Des Moines marina has very nice transient moorage, a fuel dock and an Anthony's restaurant. 

I wish I had some advice on the narrows, but I always get it wrong, but I always make it through anyway. If you do make it through on the second day, pick up a mooring ball at Eagle island. The Narrows marina is kinda out of your way. Watch out for the rock reef west of Eagle island as you head to Olympia.

Bon Voyage

Brandon
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43
Olympia 


Dan
 

My experience in boats of your description and Puget Sound in winter is
long ago, and far away now. But, I agree. A tight schedule can really be
the biggest problem. That's when we do things that we shouldn't do.
Anyhow. The Tacoma Narrows can be a gnarly place to be in a
blow-against-the-tide. My personal favorite in the mid-south PS area is
Quartermaster Hbr on the bottom of Vashon. I used to "sail" year round on
the saltchuck; it involved a great deal of motoring with a steady drip from
the backstay to my coat collar. Have a great trip. Dan


Case Turner
 

A couple of things on the safety side. When I did boat deliveries I always took along a few extra items. 

1. Waterproof (dry bag) ditch bag which i’d put the following items  in 

a. Handheld vhf
b. Handheld gps
c. Cell phone
d. Flares and sound signaling device
e. Glow sticks
f. Bottle of water
g. Compass
h. Personal identification 

Make sure the bag can be tethered to you. Most dry bags can float when closed.

2. Paper charts - not optional 

3. Survival suit with attached light.

This was before individual EPIRB or Spot like devices. But we always made sure the boat we were delivering us an active registered EPIRB. 

We also required that the boat have a life raft. 

You mention life jackets make sure they are offshore rated and that they all have working lights. 

I probably missed some items we’d take but this is a good start and I wouldn’t do a delivery with any or these items.

Case

Sent from not here

On Feb 5, 2021, at 6:18 AM, Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts@...> wrote:


Jove, I'm sure you'll get plenty of suggestions. The Waggoner Guide is a great place to start. 

I'd suggest Port Madison as your first anchorage overnight. It's quiet at this time of year. You'll find good anchorage when you go in past the second yacht club piers on the south shore. You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W

I used Navionics in and out of Port Madison for five years 2015-2020 when my boat was berthed there, and always found it very accurate. (I use it on my IPAD-4, so the screen will be a bit bigger than a phone). I used to moor my boat (5 foot draft) at the "T" pier just west of Treasure Island, which is the island immediately north of the location I suggested above. Even at the lowest tides, minus 3(!) I had room under the boat.   

Entry Port Madison is easy; it's on a south leg, with good water on both sides. Your Navionics will show you the mudflats on either side. I always stayed in the deepest part shown; never saw less than 15 feet.  

The next leg is to the southwest, with plenty of good water to the south as you pass the Seattle Yacht Club outstation (the first of the two yacht club moorages on the south side with good water right up to the piers). Mind the mooring balls all over the place; you may find you'll have to work your way through a couple of them in the fairway. Stay a little south of the southwest leg if you have to, you'll find good water there. 

The next leg is more to the west southwest as you pass the Bainbridge Yacht Club piers and enter the area I'd suggest you consider for anchorage. 

You should find this location to be safe and out of any minor traffic passing through the area

47-41.49 N
122-32-13 W  

If you need to get ashore, there is an unmarked public access point just east of that "T" pier at the end of Skogen Lane at 47-41 54.36 N ,  122 32 12.42 W. On google maps, you will see a small skiff laying on the mud flat just offshore in that location. Note the daymark between the skiff's location and the suggested anchorage, which marks a big rock. 

There are no public landings, bathrooms or facilities in Port Madison that I know of, but it is quiet and I doubt you'll be disturbed in any safe anchorage. 

I have used this tide and current predictor for the past seven years and found it generally accurate for the area on the west side of the Sound from Port Townsend to Gig Harbor. Pay attention to the extensive mudflats on the west and north side of the dogleg as you enter, as well as cross-currents

This is the Port Madison page; these are highs and lows (I stripped out sunrise and other similar data) (use at your own risk of course). With the lower of the two lows in the minus range, you'll still find good holding ground in the area I suggested. And, you'll find that even in high winds, Port Madison is extremely well protected.     
021-02-07  02:52 PST  10.41 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  07:11 PST   8.19 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-07  12:18 PST  11.11 feet  High Tide
2021-02-07  19:33 PST  -1.02 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-08  03:54 PST  11.33 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  08:37 PST   8.09 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-08  13:20 PST  10.89 feet  High Tide
2021-02-08  20:27 PST  -1.50 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  04:39 PST  11.93 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  09:38 PST   7.63 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-09  14:21 PST  10.78 feet  High Tide
2021-02-09  21:16 PST  -1.73 feet  Low Tide

2021-02-10  05:17 PST  12.24 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  10:26 PST   7.05 feet  Low Tide
2021-02-10  15:17 PST  10.73 feet  High Tide
2021-02-10  22:02 PST  -1.69 feet  Low Tide 
Shipping: I use the Marine Radar app on my phone to monitor shipping, and have found it accurate. 
Pay attention to shipping if you pass anywhere near Point No Point; the container and bulk transport ships drag big wakes (VERY big wakes) and the rapidly shoaling water as you approach the point means that the wake can build up to surprising heights in a very short period of time. In fact, I'd wait north of Point No Point to let a big guy pass and to let the wake, which you can easily see), pass you. Avoid Point No Point at periods of highest currents, as the rip just off the point is extensive.      

Look at your charts carefully as you pass south of Point No Point, as rips form along the shoaling water. They're marked on the chart. Kingston is said to be good once inside the breakwater, but that's a ferry landing and noisy, and the anchorage just south of the breakwater is pretty rough.  I use the Washington Department of Transportation ferry schedules to stay out of the way of the Kingston-Edmonds ferry (which run at 18-22 knots) but have not found their wake excessive. This is the Kingston-Edmonds schedule

Port Madison Bay can be bumpy, as it is open to the southeast and north west. I've seen boats anchored off Indianola in the northwest corner, but haven't done so myself. You may find some small craft traffic while you head over towards Port Madison harbor, they're coming or going towards Agate Pass on the southwest end of the big bay.  

Tacoma is a major port, so you'll find shipping traffic all the way down there. I like to transit west of Vashon despite the current (no traffic except an occasional tug and barge). 

Best wishes for a safe and enjoyable passage!  

Pete Leenhouts
Port Ludlow WA
MV RIPTIDE 

      




-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 4, 2021 6:11 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey guys,
I am hoping to move my Pearson 33 this weekend from Everett to Olympia.
I want to share my float plan with you lot in case you have pointers. 

WEATHER
Not ideal weather window but I want the boat closer and I'm needing to move it from the brokerage slip in Everett.
Saturday is high winds, gusting 25-30, so that's out.
Sunday through Tuesday leaves a window for a 3 day cruise. With medium winds and light rain.

BOAT and CREW.
Boat has good plotter, diesel engine in good order with a 3 blade prop, diesel heater. Galley, head, etc.
I have myself and 2 crew, one more experienced than me has owned boats, and one less, has sailed fernridge racing with me on a friend's 28 for a season.

DAYS and LOCATIONS
Planning around 30 miles per day. Leaving in the morning just before low tide to flood our way south. The low slack at the tacoma narrows is 10.30 AM on Tuesday, which should make that easy and the rising tide can push us down into Olympia. Advice welcomed on that.
Obviously I don't want to go through with much head current, but I wonder... is a current flow with me to be avoided also?.... I was thinking within an hour of low slack would be best.

Planning 2 anchored or docked overnights,
1st night:
Pord madison north bainbridge
or
Eagle harbour, Winslow on bainbridge

2nd night,
Gig harbour
OR,
breakwater marina near tacoma.

An alternate plan would be to get through the narrows in the afternoon on the second day and overnight at a marina after the narrows like "narrows marina" etc. Or anchor out in a bay round the corner. There is a slack at 2pm Monday.

MAPS
I've got a decent electronic chart plotter on the boat, and I've got Navionics on my phone.
and I'm using "openCPN" on the PC to plan the route. Images below.
I'm using "deep zoom.com" to check tidal currents at various times and places.
I have books "cruising guide to the puget sound" and "tidal currents of puget sound"

Any reason not to go west of Vashon Island?

OTHER
I have US boat tow if I need it, and insurance, life jackets, flares and so forth.
Also wet weather gear.

All ideas, tips and alternatives welcomed.
Thanks,
Jove

<image.png>

<image.png>

<image.png>

<image.png>

<image.png>

<image.png>
<image.png>
<image.png>
<image.png>
<image.png>


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
image.png 
image.png
image.png
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
image.png   image.png 
image.png  image.png
image.png image.png

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
image.png image.png 
image.png image.png

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.

We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
image.png  image.png
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
image.png
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove


Pete Leenhouts
 

Great trip report, Jove!  

WR/Pete
Port Ludlow WA


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 11, 2021 6:04 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
image.png 
image.png
image.png
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
image.png   image.png 
image.png  image.png
image.png image.png

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
image.png image.png 
image.png image.png

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.

We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
image.png  image.png
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
image.png
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove


Andrew Linn
 

Nice writeup!

On 2/11/2021 6:04 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
image.png
image.png
image.png
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
image.png image.png
image.png image.png
image.png image.png

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
image.png image.png
image.png image.png

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, *thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.*
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.
*
*
We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
image.png image.png
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
image.png
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove


Richard Green
 

Thanks for sharing the story!!!

Rich

On Feb 11, 2021, at 6:45 PM, Pete Leenhouts via groups.io <pleenhouts@...> wrote:

Great trip report, Jove!  

WR/Pete
Port Ludlow WA


-----Original Message-----
From: Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 11, 2021 6:04 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Float plan, Everett to Olympia

Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
There will be some extra detail that I'm putting in mostly for myself, such as fuel numbers, but you might also find it interesting.

The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night. We got lucky and barely got rained on at all, even had sun the majority of the trip. But we did have a head wind the the 30s and 40s most of the way and could see our breath in the cabin often except in the evenings when we ran a heater on shore power, and the diesel heat at times. Hit the narrows right, at low slack and had no issue. We went through the Colvos passage west of Vashon island, It was calm and helped our progress. We had around 0.4 kts against us, but avoiding the other 2 sides of the triangle and the extra traffic was worth it.

We had myself and 2 crew on board.
Erin didn't want to "drive the boat" so Andrew and I took turns every couple hours. Although she was quick to take the tiller when we were under sail.... the truth comes out after all.
We left the dock at 8.30 each day, after stowing everything, using the bathroom and making the first coffee. This gave us really calm conditions for the first couple hours. We could have left earlier, sunrise was 7.30, but it wasn't desirable or necessary.

Day one started, gently motoring out of Everett marina into a calm sunny and cold day, with a light headwind.
We had run the motor, checked the diesel and gathered an extra 15 gallons in jerry cans from a service station the night before. We didn't know how much the boat would use, it has a universal M4-30 which makes 23 bhp, a little googling suggested it would be between 1 and 2 gallons per hour. With no fuel gauge, I used a dipstick and a tape measure to keep track during the trip.
We made breakfast and scrubbed the deck underway.
Ferry's move really fast and come out at 17kts, it's important to keep your head on a swivel for them, Some of them run every 20 mins. so one will pass ahead of you, and then another behind you in a pretty short period of time. But we only once had to change course to make it clear that we saw him and were not going to get in the way.
<image.png> 
<image.png>
<image.png>
The first day we were hoping to make Shilshole, or Port Madison, Edmunds was our "ditch the trip" location. When we got to shilshole it was still lunch time, we agreed to make for Blake island.
Crossing the sound, where you see the 305 on the map below, was the choppiest part of the trip with a headwind in the high teens, and enough chop to make the hull slap occasionally, our progress slowed to a little over 3kts. Most of the trip we made 5 kts under power, sometimes 6 if it was calm or with a slight tidal help. I had tried to time the part of the month so we'd get some todal help each day, which mostly worked out with a low tide in the morning that could help us along as it filled up.

Blake island is a state marine park with a ~4 mile perimeter. The docks there were half empty, because of Winter, and Covid, and Sunday night, from what I hear it's usually full by 10 AM. It was $23.10 for a 33ft boat.
Blake island is beautiful, there are sweet little anchorages and mooring balls on the south and west sides.
We hiked the island loop trail around 4 miles, after which we were wiped from a long day, made food, had a beer and went to bed.

Navigation was done mostly with "Open CPN" on a laptop, with "Navionics" app on phone as a secondary, and this worked well. The boat had a bulkhead chart plotter which was running too.
We also used "deep zoom" to look at tides & currents, And NOAA marine weather etc.
There was an AIS alarm on the VHF that gave an alarm whenever commercial ships entered out 5nm radius. Which was both helpful and a little annoying.
I also had a cruising guide that gave overall maps of the area, and detailed maps of key marinas and anchorages with descriptions. I did not have full size paper charts. A waterproof flip chart is on my short shopping list.
<image.png>   <image.png> 
<image.png>  <image.png>
<image.png> <image.png>

We were elated to make it through the narrows around noon on day 2, please with the progress.
We saw a number of Harbor Porpoises in the big eddy at "fish haven" which is an underwater mount around 40 ft deep after the narrows heading south.
The small passages below McNiel island were beautiful and calm. McNiel island is a prison, you can see the old disused prison from the water, but the modern facility is in the center of the island and houses sex offenders.... who knew.

As we turned into budd inlet above Olympia we finally had the wind and time on our side and we hoisted sail for an hour or so. Practiced tacking, Reefing and Pointing.
The boat moved along quite nicely at around half the apparent wind on a close reach. 3.5kts in 7kts apparent. I didn't have time for a thorough impression of sailing performance, but I'm looking forward to learning more, and at least happy it's not a slug. PHRF is 180 I believe.
<image.png> <image.png> 
<image.png> <image.png>

Fuel, measured with a cane and a tape measure.
Start 9" out of 11" in tank.
3 hrs at 2500rpm 5kts, 16nm fuel dropped 1",
3h20, harder motoring, fuel dropped 1.5"
Olympia, fuel at 4.5" down from 6.5 at blake, down 2" in 7 hrs.
5 gallons of fuel brough fuel up from 4.5 to 7, 2.5" rise. So 1/2" is about one gallon.
Total drop, 4.5" (from the refill we know this is 9 gallons), total time 13.5, thus 0.66 gallons per hour average, up to 1 gallon per hour when fighting chop.
There has to be a better way than a stick and a tape measure, but this seems to work.

We had two "oh shit" moments, one was when the bilge pump kicked in while under sail on day 2, it filled the cockpit with an inch of water in about 30 seconds and had us diving through cupboards looking for a leaking through hull, we concluded that it was simply build up from drips from the cutlass bearing after 2 days of motoring.
The other moment was coming into the slip, I took the wrong slip (not the one I'd paid for) and had to leave the marina and do it over. Andrew took the opportunity to show me how to use prop walk and prop walk to turn the boat on a dime. It was working until the energetic use of the throttle made the lever slip on it's shaft and we were stuck (in idle luckily). I decided this would work and managed to dock it in idle by playing the forward Neutral reverse lever. The throttle is on a round shaft with a pinch screw. I'm planning to drill it and put a stainless spring pin/roll pin through it or similarly ruggedize this joint. I was not able to get it any tighter with the pinch screw, a bolt and nut may work. Advice welcomed. I'm sure I will find an endless stream of small upgrades like this. I already replaced the main-sheet fiddle block which was made in england from futnol and looks ancient. The boat will be 50 next year, I'll have to plan a party.
<image.png>  <image.png>
The boat is settled in at West Bay marina in Olympia.
We met many of the friendly neighbors on adjacent boats. Some are active sailors. There are other boats there that have 100lbs of muscles growing on the rudder alone, it's kind of amazing. I don't know how long that takes. But it's clearly a good location for shellfish.

Endless thanks to my crew, they were perfect. Endlessly helpful, filled with knowledge and forethought, and great company.
<image.png>
Thanks for reading, and for all your tips before the trip.
Here's hoping the pictures send.
-Jove
<image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png><image.png>


 

Good report, Jove. Thanks. I'm glad the trip went well, with only one equipment failure, that didn't cause a disaster. Too bad you didn't get to sail more. You'll probably find some more things that need fixing when you do get to do more sailing. <g> Sometime you should lower the mast and check all the fitting up there where you can't get to them otherwise.

So, were the raccoons hibernating when you visited Blake Island? It's a beautiful park, but infested by furry thieves. <g>

On 2/11/2021 6:04 PM, Jove wrote:
Hey folks, Here is my trip update.
...
The trip from Everett to Olympia went well, 2 days motoring, a couple hours sailing. We covered 31 nautical miles the first day, and 42nm on the 2nd day.
Stayed on Blake island the 1st night.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet. (Mohandas K. Gandhi)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com