First day with the new AF4B


 

Ken on Bainbridge Island got his AF4 Breve in the water. Congratulations, Ken! She's a beauty.

What happened to your Mixer2?


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: First day with the new AF4B
Date: Sat, 15 May 2021 09:16:24 -0700
From: Ken Preston
To: John Kohnen

The motor is a 1983 vintage Evinrude 7.5.  With it she seems to run between 5 and 7 statute over a wide range of throttle settings, with no fuss.  At full throttle she clearly got up on plane and made 9.6 statute.  Water barely rippled away from the dock. She's essentially completely empty now. . .one small anchor, six gallons of gas, 180 pounds of driver, another 180 of photographer. . .and the motor.  Otherwise just bare boat.  I'd doubt she'll still get up on plane with the 7.5 with a full load of food, water, bedding, toilet and so forth, so we'll figure she will make the required 6 kn easily, but not much more when out for a trip.
I haven't tried the oars yet, nor the small Minnkota motor, but clearly with all the windage she'll be a downwind proposition with such small power.
I'm starting to feel like the one-piece lid suits me pretty well.  For sure it doesn't leak, and it's surprisingly handy.  It slides forward to the stempost making an easy entry to the cabin, or it flops over to either side, looking weird, but opening up the whole slot, or it stows tidily below strapped up on edge in the open door way.  The proposed hinge and weatherstripping are sitting on the shop bench waiting their chance, but for now. . .
And finally, I'd say you need to warn people to fill ALL the screw holes from the temporary frames early in the build. . .especially the ones down near the bottom.  Amazing how much water you can squeeze through a #8 screw hole if the screw is out of it. . .
So, again, my thanks to both of you, it looks like I have a boat again.
Cheers,
Ken

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done. (Ludwig Wittgenstein)



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Richard Green
 

A beauty for sure! I do confess that one piece lid on a sixteen foot’er is more than I’d like to wrassle around, especially in a chop, for example.

Rich

On May 15, 2021, at 10:35 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Ken on Bainbridge Island got his AF4 Breve in the water. Congratulations, Ken! She's a beauty.

What happened to your Mixer2?


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: First day with the new AF4B
Date: Sat, 15 May 2021 09:16:24 -0700
From: Ken Preston
To: John Kohnen

The motor is a 1983 vintage Evinrude 7.5. With it she seems to run between 5 and 7 statute over a wide range of throttle settings, with no fuss. At full throttle she clearly got up on plane and made 9.6 statute. Water barely rippled away from the dock. She's essentially completely empty now. . .one small anchor, six gallons of gas, 180 pounds of driver, another 180 of photographer. . .and the motor. Otherwise just bare boat. I'd doubt she'll still get up on plane with the 7.5 with a full load of food, water, bedding, toilet and so forth, so we'll figure she will make the required 6 kn easily, but not much more when out for a trip.
I haven't tried the oars yet, nor the small Minnkota motor, but clearly with all the windage she'll be a downwind proposition with such small power.
I'm starting to feel like the one-piece lid suits me pretty well. For sure it doesn't leak, and it's surprisingly handy. It slides forward to the stempost making an easy entry to the cabin, or it flops over to either side, looking weird, but opening up the whole slot, or it stows tidily below strapped up on edge in the open door way. The proposed hinge and weatherstripping are sitting on the shop bench waiting their chance, but for now. . .
And finally, I'd say you need to warn people to fill ALL the screw holes from the temporary frames early in the build. . .especially the ones down near the bottom. Amazing how much water you can squeeze through a #8 screw hole if the screw is out of it. . .
So, again, my thanks to both of you, it looks like I have a boat again.
Cheers,
Ken

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done. (Ludwig Wittgenstein)



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<AF4BFirstLaunch-1.jpg><AF4BFirstLaunch-2.jpg>


Ken Preston
 

Obviously, I don't know yet, and for sure the hinge and Cal's weatherstripping will stand by faithfully if the  whole 7' lid gets to be a problem.  It's really light, which of course translates to flimsy, or at least flexible.  The ply is 6mm okoume and the "frame" is 3/4" x 1-1/4" fir, no metallic fasteners (Titebond 3).  I suspect its larger fright would be as a sail in a hard breeze, it's almost 12 square feet which could be quite a handful in 20 kn of air!  Its functionality is greatly helped by the "flexibility" of its anchorage system.  The system I thought I was copying used (per video on Youtube) small loops of bungee connecting the lid and coaming at three points along each side.  It quickly became apparent that such short loops only functioned as latches, they didn't have enough stretch to also allow the lid to hinge up and outboard.  With padeyes on the lid and hooks on the coaming, it was easy to simply stretch a 5' piece of bungee through the padeyes on each side of the lid, allowing adequate stretch, but also a bonus.  The options are:
1.  Pull down the bungee and hook to all three hooks on each side.  Lid is very secure at highway speeds.
2.  Unhook three hooks on one side.  Lid can now flop over outboard under control and lies tightly against the coaming, supported outboard by the fender cleats at the deck edge. Makes a "table" stable enough to work on at the aft end where the deck is widest.  Ugly as sin, but you can't see that from the cockpit.
3. Instead, unhook the aft most hook on each side and you can easily slide the lid forward the 8" to the point the forward hooks foul the forward coaming, allowing easier access for an old guy into the cabin.
4.  if you want a comfortable standing room at the aft end of the cabin, just duck under the lid and unhook the two FORWARD hooks as well.  Lid is still moderately well restrained by the middle hooks, but can now be "hopped" (technical term) over the forward end of the coaming and slid forward to the stem, where it hangs up. This is weird but not really terribly ugly and provides a pleasant sized standing room while still keeping drizzle out of the bulk of the cabin..
5.  The wrassling comes when you want to stow it below.  Since the slot is FULL length of the cabin, the lid clearly is too long to secure entirely below.  It will, however, lie reasonably neatly in the open companionway, sticking about 3 inches out into the cockpit.  A separate piece of bungee stretched just inside the edge of the companion serves to clamp the lid tightly in place at the aft end.  If conditions seem to warrant (underway in any event) you can also go forward and hook up the bungee over the top of the forward hook on the coaming. . .not kosher but works. . .so far.
And I still have an un-broken cabin top over my bedding.  But we shall see.  I'm not sending back the hinge or the weatherstripping!
Ken