Electric punt


Edward Epifani
 

Cal, check this out, a punt designed by Paul Fisher on Duckwork’s site. There is a 6’ wide, higher freeboard version as well. But the long narrow  version would suit low power. He has mods for a cuddy as well. I am imagining a 4-6’ cuddy and a sitting head room dog house. Small aft deck for standing. Alas, I’m home with a cold, which lends too much time for thought. The hole in my shop beckons after finishing the RedZinger Oz Goose. My wife knows the signs and is cringing: another boat!?




Edward Epifani
 

If you imagine a long, High-ish cabin trunk with tiny fore and aft decks, you would have a boat reminiscent of one of Sam McKinney’s boats, the Portland ranconteur who popularized low power cruising on the western sounds and rivers. Godspeed, Sam.


On May 8, 2022, at 9:58 AM, Edward Epifani <edepifani@...> wrote:


Cal, check this out, a punt designed by Paul Fisher on Duckwork’s site. There is a 6’ wide, higher freeboard version as well. But the long narrow  version would suit low power. He has mods for a cuddy as well. I am imagining a 4-6’ cuddy and a sitting head room dog house. Small aft deck for standing. Alas, I’m home with a cold, which lends too much time for thought. The hole in my shop beckons after finishing the RedZinger Oz Goose. My wife knows the signs and is cringing: another boat!?

<IMG_0096.jpg>



 

The Selway Fisher Curlew punt is designed to carry up to a 20 hp. motor, so it has a flat run for planing, and a deeply immersed transom at rest. That creates drag at displacement speeds. A good flat-bottomed boat should have a run gradually curving up to a transom with its bottom at, or above the waterline, to let the water slip smoothly out from under the boat. Good shapes for flat-bottom electric boats can be found in the better rowing skiffs. If you're gonna be hauling around a lot of heavy lead/acid batteries, working skiffs from yesteryear could work well.

https://www.selway-fisher.com/Mcup16.htm

A skiff like the one in the attachment can carry a bunch of batteries without hurting the performance much if they're placed a little aft, so the stem doesn't get immersed any, or much, more than shown. Drag won't go up much until the bottom of the transom gets immersed.

On 5/8/2022 9:58 AM, Ozgoose Ed wrote:
Cal, check this out, a punt designed by Paul Fisher on Duckwork’s site. There is a 6’ wide, higher freeboard version as well. But the long narrow  version would suit low power. He has mods for a cuddy as well. I am imagining a 4-6’ cuddy and a sitting head room dog house. Small aft deck for standing. Alas, I’m home with a cold, which lends too much time for thought. The hole in my shop beckons after finishing the RedZinger Oz Goose. My wife knows the signs and is cringing: another boat!?
--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is a custom, amounting almost to tradition, that true boat speeds are obscene and must never be mentioned except in a highly dressed up state. (Lindsay Lord)
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Myles's electric boat is one of Sam McKinney's power barges. Originally built (with royalties from his book of the same name, IIRC) to use a gas outboard:

https://flic.kr/p/4Zv7vT

On 5/8/2022 10:19 AM, OzGoose Ed wrote:
If you imagine a long, High-ish cabin trunk with tiny fore and aft decks, you would have a boat reminiscent of one of Sam McKinney’s boats, the Portland ranconteur who popularized low power cruising on the western sounds and rivers. Godspeed, Sam.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
The slower the speed, the more interesting the shape; that's a truism in boat design. Low speed requires a degree of symmetry that must be discarded the moment hull speed is approached or exceeded and that's always seemed to me an aesthetic loss that is difficult to recover... (Paul Gartside)
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Edward Epifani
 

Thanks, John, the Duckworks site did not have a profile plan. The LWL drawing on the site you sent does show the Curlew transom in the water at load. A true punt would have more rocker and overhang at the stern as well as the bow. But such would make hanging a motor awkward. They were rowed or poled. What does a fit human produce? 1/4 hp if I remember? Got to design for that. Especially beam to width ratio…all the early power yachts were long and narrow. Electric , steam,and human power all are served by long skinny boats.
I have one more boat in me, and the boat shop ( which my wife thinks is a garage) has a hole in it.  I think it will see one more boat coming out of it. My nephew is terrified of a heeling sailboat, and will never go with me on the Goose if the wind is> than 5mph. However… he really needs a clam/crab Skiff. I really don’t want to set traps or throw a big sack of muddy clams from my OzGoose. I revisited “Boats with an Open Mind” last night… Bolgers “Clam  Skiff “popped up. In that chapter he has an excellent discussion on hydro dynamics of planing pointy bowed flat  bottom boats. They are quirky and can kill you if overdriven and turned too quickly. But are tempting if kept narrow… modest planing performance 12-15 knots is plenty…He addressed bow dynamics, skid, broach with a laminated step keel, that precedes that used in Micro Trawler, and Hawkeye. He designed several boats that successfully used it, including a Japanese style fishing boat. Garveys and Auray skiffs avoid the problem with lots of bow overhang. But one has to keep passengers off the bow.The step keel seems to have originated Japan, as a way to drive the hull economically, with sponsons to take the load if one was lucky and found a lot of fish. Bolger seems to have originated use at planing speeds.
So I think I’ll build the Clam Skiff for said nephew, set it up with a 9.9 hp OB , and forbid him from ever putting more than 20 hp on it. I contacted HH Payson , and they do appear to have paper plans. There is now a 15’6” version in addition to the 18’ original. It’s a prosaic boat, but has a nice sheer sweep, and is not easily confused with a beer can.


On May 9, 2022, at 1:36 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

The Selway Fisher Curlew punt is designed to carry up to a 20 hp. motor, so it has a flat run for planing, and a deeply immersed transom at rest. That creates drag at displacement speeds. A good flat-bottomed boat should have a run gradually curving up to a transom with its bottom at, or above the waterline, to let the water slip smoothly out from under the boat. Good shapes for flat-bottom electric boats can be found in the better rowing skiffs. If you're gonna be hauling around a lot of heavy lead/acid batteries, working skiffs from yesteryear could work well.

https://www.selway-fisher.com/Mcup16.htm

A skiff like the one in the attachment can carry a bunch of batteries without hurting the performance much if they're placed a little aft, so the stem doesn't get immersed any, or much, more than shown. Drag won't go up much until the bottom of the transom gets immersed.

On 5/8/2022 9:58 AM, Ozgoose Ed wrote:
Cal, check this out, a punt designed by Paul Fisher on Duckwork’s site. There is a 6’ wide, higher freeboard version as well. But the long narrow  version would suit low power. He has mods for a cuddy as well. I am imagining a 4-6’ cuddy and a sitting head room dog house. Small aft deck for standing. Alas, I’m home with a cold, which lends too much time for thought. The hole in my shop beckons after finishing the RedZinger Oz Goose. My wife knows the signs and is cringing: another boat!?

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is a custom, amounting almost to tradition, that true boat speeds are obscene and must never be mentioned except in a highly dressed up state. (Lindsay Lord)


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<OldStyleRowingSkiffS.png>


Jarom
 

I knew I recognized that boat and the name Sam Mckinney. I've been watching old episodes of Oregon Field Guide with my kids and he's in season 4, episode 6 taking about the salmon industry on the lower Columbia. 


On Mon, May 9, 2022, 1:39 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Myles's electric boat is one of Sam McKinney's power barges. Originally
built (with royalties from his book of the same name, IIRC) to use a gas
outboard:

https://flic.kr/p/4Zv7vT

On 5/8/2022 10:19 AM, OzGoose Ed wrote:
> If you imagine a long, High-ish cabin trunk with tiny fore and aft
> decks, you would have a boat reminiscent of one of Sam McKinney’s boats,
> the Portland ranconteur who popularized low power cruising on the
> western sounds and rivers. Godspeed, Sam.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The slower the speed, the more interesting the shape; that's a truism in
boat design. Low speed requires a degree of symmetry that must be
discarded the moment hull speed is approached or exceeded and that's
always seemed to me an aesthetic loss that is difficult to recover...
(Paul Gartside)


--
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