Depoe Bay Wooden Boat Show


 

Elaine-

Thanks for offering to step up and help keep the Depoe Bay show alive.

How's your creative writing? Mass emailing skills? Spreadsheet abilities? What would really be helpful is keeping in touch with past Boat Show exhibitors and keeping their interest in the show up. If you're interested, I can send you a spreadsheet with exhibitor contact info. I can coach you through minor technical stumbles, if needed.

Interested?

Take care of yourself.

On 12/25/2020 12:47 PM, You wrote:
I would really like to help bring Depoe Bay boat show back. It's one of my favorite shows. I can't bring Belle Starr but I have others to show.
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Winter, a lingering season, is a time to gather golden moments, embark upon a sentimental journey, and enjoy every idle hour. (John Boswell)
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Oops! That was supposed to go just to Elaine...

But it's not a bad time to bring up the Depoe Bay show, and what we can do to keep it alive. Looking through all those old photos while putting the Coot Calendar together brought back a lot of good memories of the Depoe Bay Wooden Boat Show and Crab Feed. We've had a lot of good times there. :o) It's gonna be tough to get the momentum rolling again after two years without a show. I'm hoping some of you volunteer to help get the show going again. Maybe we can even form a committee! <gasp> I've gotta learn to delegate...

On 1/4/2021 3:36 PM, I wrote:
Elaine-
Thanks for offering to step up and help keep the Depoe Bay show alive.
...
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. (Patrick F. McManus)
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Mixed signals from Depoe Bay. One person in a position of authority says there won't be a Boat Show and Crab Feed this year. Another person in a position of authority says they're thinking about a take-out crab feed, and if there _was_ a boat show would any Coots come?

I think it's doubtful that anything will happen in April. We could eat crab and display boats outside safely enough, with precautions, but the volunteers who do all the work would have trouble staying safe, and a lot of them aren't young anymore.

On 1/4/2021 3:44 PM, I wrote:
...
But it's not a bad time to bring up the Depoe Bay show, and what we can do to keep it alive. Looking through all those old photos while putting the Coot Calendar together brought back a lot of good memories of the Depoe Bay Wooden Boat Show and Crab Feed. We've had a lot of good times there. :o) It's gonna be tough to get the momentum rolling again after two years without a show. I'm hoping some of you volunteer to help get the show going again. Maybe we can even form a committee! <gasp> I've gotta learn to delegate...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. (Booker T. Washington)
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Looking through the old pictures for the Calendar, one thing I noticed was that having activity on the water made the Depoe Bay shows more fun, and got people down on the docks. When Jack and Maggie were in charge there was a rowing race against the clock. IIRC, the same rowboat was used by everyone, timed from a buoy off the end of the first dock. by the CG station, around a buoy off the end of the dock next to the fuel dock and back. Maybe we could start that up again. We'd just need a boat, one of ours or the Boathouses, and somebody to hold a stopwatch and write down the times. There's still a Depoe bay Rowing Club, or at least was a few years ago, run by Beanie Robison, using clumsy, but "safe", plastic boats (Kenyon, one of the alumni of the original Killer Whales, told me the plastic boats are pigs to row). Maybe we could get them involved, and let them try out a good rowboat to boot.

Anybody want to volunteer to be in charge of on the water activities?

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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Just think what a dull world it would be if everyone was sensible. (Lucy Maud Montgomery)


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Jamie Orr
 

Hey John, I received your calendar yesterday, was doing some reminiscing too.  Won't happen this year, but if the show survives, there'd be a good chance of having a piper in 2022.  I hope Depoe Bay won't let this show go away, and I agree the on-the-water events were a big part of it.

Jamie

BTW, Really liked Miss November!


 

I'll bet you liked Miss November, Jamie! :o) I hope Wayward Lass isn't feeling jealous of Orkney Lass nowadays. <g> I sure hope you do bring your pipes to Depoe Bay next year.

The Crab Feed is important for the Depoe Bay Chamber of Commerce, and the Boat Show increases attendance at the Feed. The year when they had a Crab Feed but no Boat Show didn't work out very well. It'll be hard to get the momentum of the Boat Show going again, but we'll have the support of the CoC.

We'll need to put some work into making the show better when it returns. It's gonna take a team effort. Elaine volunteered to keep past, and potential, exhibitors interested. We need someone to be in charge of on-water activities -- rowing against the clock, kayak demonstrations, etc. Whatever is interesting. We'll bring back the boat blessing, so we need someone to row Jamie and his pipes around the harbor, and somebody to dress in a silly costume and bless the boats. I know the 2022 show is more than a year away, but we can start laying the foundation now, so we don't get caught at the last minute.

Oh. One very important thing is to keep being nice to Mark N, so he brings his shelter. ;o)

It was fun going through 20 years of photos for this year's Coot Calendar. Brought back a lot of good memories. :o) I think I'll include one or two "vintage" photos in future Calendars, not just shots from the prior year.

On 1/9/2021 9:04 PM, Jamie wrote:
Hey John, I received your calendar yesterday, was doing some reminiscing too.  Won't happen this year, but if the show survives, there'd be a good chance of having a piper in 2022.  I hope Depoe Bay won't let this show go away, and I agree the on-the-water events were a big part of it.
Jamie
BTW, Really liked Miss November!
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The problem with some people is that when they aren’t drunk, they’re sober. (William Butler Yeats)
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Mark Neuhaus
 

Hi John,

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:47 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

We'll need to put some work into making the show better when it returns.
It's gonna take a team effort.

I had a 1 inch diameter three strand nylon rope about 80 feet long that I acquired a long time ago, and several years later, decided it needed to be washed.  Silly me, trying to make it easy on myself, I dumped it in the washing machine and you can guess what came out after the cycle.  Yep, a horribly untwisted, useless bunch of kinked strands. Never one to give up, I took it completely apart and wound each strand on a dowel bobbin, planning to weave them into thinner 6 or 8 strand ropes someday.  

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at twisting some of the strands into a three strand rope instead and got out my portable drill.  Working in the basement, I got a decent 20 foot rope and then went outside with more strands and my daughter, and got an okay 60 foot length. Not as tightly wound as I'd hope, but I know why that happened and will correct it next time. 

At a maritime festival in Portland some years ago, there was a ropemaking set-up that visitors could observe and/or partake in.  It occured to me that this might be an interesting addition to one of our coastal messabouts.  I'd be willing to make up a more traditional rig if this seems like something we'd like to present at a show.  Or has anyone already done this before? Short pieces of rope made from jute, hemp, sisal or whatever that go home with visitors might make a nice souvenir. 
 
Oh. One very important thing is to keep being nice to Mark N, so he
brings his shelter. ;o)

 Darn tootin' you better be. :-)    I entertained the thought of putting it up in my driveway if I bring the Tolman home, but decided it would be too much trouble to take down to bring to the show. So it stays stored until the next Depoe Bay messabout.

Mark


Case Turner
 

How about along with rope making, how to make a sailors whisk. I bought all the stuff needed and never put one together.


On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 10:43 AM Mark Neuhaus <moonlitturtle1934@...> wrote:
Hi John,

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:47 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

We'll need to put some work into making the show better when it returns.
It's gonna take a team effort.

I had a 1 inch diameter three strand nylon rope about 80 feet long that I acquired a long time ago, and several years later, decided it needed to be washed.  Silly me, trying to make it easy on myself, I dumped it in the washing machine and you can guess what came out after the cycle.  Yep, a horribly untwisted, useless bunch of kinked strands. Never one to give up, I took it completely apart and wound each strand on a dowel bobbin, planning to weave them into thinner 6 or 8 strand ropes someday.  

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at twisting some of the strands into a three strand rope instead and got out my portable drill.  Working in the basement, I got a decent 20 foot rope and then went outside with more strands and my daughter, and got an okay 60 foot length. Not as tightly wound as I'd hope, but I know why that happened and will correct it next time. 

At a maritime festival in Portland some years ago, there was a ropemaking set-up that visitors could observe and/or partake in.  It occured to me that this might be an interesting addition to one of our coastal messabouts.  I'd be willing to make up a more traditional rig if this seems like something we'd like to present at a show.  Or has anyone already done this before? Short pieces of rope made from jute, hemp, sisal or whatever that go home with visitors might make a nice souvenir. 
 
Oh. One very important thing is to keep being nice to Mark N, so he
brings his shelter. ;o)

 Darn tootin' you better be. :-)    I entertained the thought of putting it up in my driveway if I bring the Tolman home, but decided it would be too much trouble to take down to bring to the show. So it stays stored until the next Depoe Bay messabout.

Mark


--
Dirt


Stephen Miller
 

Another project added to my list!

Thanks

Steve Miller

On Mon, Jan 11, 2021, 10:53 AM Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:
How about along with rope making, how to make a sailors whisk. I bought all the stuff needed and never put one together.


On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 10:43 AM Mark Neuhaus <moonlitturtle1934@...> wrote:
Hi John,

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:47 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

We'll need to put some work into making the show better when it returns.
It's gonna take a team effort.

I had a 1 inch diameter three strand nylon rope about 80 feet long that I acquired a long time ago, and several years later, decided it needed to be washed.  Silly me, trying to make it easy on myself, I dumped it in the washing machine and you can guess what came out after the cycle.  Yep, a horribly untwisted, useless bunch of kinked strands. Never one to give up, I took it completely apart and wound each strand on a dowel bobbin, planning to weave them into thinner 6 or 8 strand ropes someday.  

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at twisting some of the strands into a three strand rope instead and got out my portable drill.  Working in the basement, I got a decent 20 foot rope and then went outside with more strands and my daughter, and got an okay 60 foot length. Not as tightly wound as I'd hope, but I know why that happened and will correct it next time. 

At a maritime festival in Portland some years ago, there was a ropemaking set-up that visitors could observe and/or partake in.  It occured to me that this might be an interesting addition to one of our coastal messabouts.  I'd be willing to make up a more traditional rig if this seems like something we'd like to present at a show.  Or has anyone already done this before? Short pieces of rope made from jute, hemp, sisal or whatever that go home with visitors might make a nice souvenir. 
 
Oh. One very important thing is to keep being nice to Mark N, so he
brings his shelter. ;o)

 Darn tootin' you better be. :-)    I entertained the thought of putting it up in my driveway if I bring the Tolman home, but decided it would be too much trouble to take down to bring to the show. So it stays stored until the next Depoe Bay messabout.

Mark


--
Dirt


 

I can't remember what it's called, and am too lazy to look it up right now, but you need "something" to keep the strands apart and taut while twisting the rope together. You can see one in use here, and you can also see why it's called a "ropewalk":

https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA

A nice little video, but they skip over some of the details, so parts of the process look like magic. <g>

If you look around, you can find plenty online about small ropewalks for making rope for models. There's even a Lego ropewalk on the Interweb somewhere! These tiny ropewalks could be scaled up to Boat Show size.

Good idea, Mark.

On 1/11/2021 10:43 AM, Mark N wrote:
...
I had a 1 inch diameter three strand nylon rope about 80 feet long that I acquired a long time ago, and several years later, decided it needed to be washed.  Silly me, trying to make it easy on myself, I dumped it in the washing machine and you can guess what came out after the cycle. Yep, a horribly untwisted, useless bunch of kinked strands. Never one to give up, I took it completely apart and wound each strand on a dowel bobbin, planning to weave them into thinner 6 or 8 strand ropes someday.
A couple of weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at twisting some of the strands into a three strand rope instead and got out my portable drill. Working in the basement, I got a decent 20 foot rope and then went outside with more strands and my daughter, and got an okay 60 foot length. Not as tightly wound as I'd hope, but I know why that happened and will correct it next time.
At a maritime festival in Portland some years ago, there was a ropemaking set-up that visitors could observe and/or partake in.  It occured to me that this might be an interesting addition to one of our coastal messabouts.  I'd be willing to make up a more traditional rig if this seems like something we'd like to present at a show.  Or has anyone already done this before? Short pieces of rope made from jute, hemp, sisal or whatever that go home with visitors might make a nice souvenir.
...
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It is requisite for the relaxation of the mind that we make use, from time to time, of playful deeds and jokes. (St. Thomas Aquinas)
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The Retired Old Geezers had a whisk making contest some months ago. Maybe some of them could be recruited to do some demos.

On 1/11/2021 10:53 AM, Case wrote:
How about along with rope making, how to make a sailors whisk. I bought all the stuff needed and never put one together.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjTVF1mzLH8
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Everyone should believe in something; I believe I'll go fishing. (Henry David Thoreau)
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Richard Green
 

Dang near no one knows where rope comes from, sounds like a great idea to me!!

Rich

On Jan 11, 2021, at 10:43 AM, Mark Neuhaus <moonlitturtle1934@...> wrote:

Hi John,

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:47 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

We'll need to put some work into making the show better when it returns.
It's gonna take a team effort.

I had a 1 inch diameter three strand nylon rope about 80 feet long that I acquired a long time ago, and several years later, decided it needed to be washed.  Silly me, trying to make it easy on myself, I dumped it in the washing machine and you can guess what came out after the cycle.  Yep, a horribly untwisted, useless bunch of kinked strands. Never one to give up, I took it completely apart and wound each strand on a dowel bobbin, planning to weave them into thinner 6 or 8 strand ropes someday.  

A couple of weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at twisting some of the strands into a three strand rope instead and got out my portable drill.  Working in the basement, I got a decent 20 foot rope and then went outside with more strands and my daughter, and got an okay 60 foot length. Not as tightly wound as I'd hope, but I know why that happened and will correct it next time. 

At a maritime festival in Portland some years ago, there was a ropemaking set-up that visitors could observe and/or partake in.  It occured to me that this might be an interesting addition to one of our coastal messabouts.  I'd be willing to make up a more traditional rig if this seems like something we'd like to present at a show.  Or has anyone already done this before? Short pieces of rope made from jute, hemp, sisal or whatever that go home with visitors might make a nice souvenir. 
 
Oh. One very important thing is to keep being nice to Mark N, so he
brings his shelter. ;o)

 Darn tootin' you better be. :-)    I entertained the thought of putting it up in my driveway if I bring the Tolman home, but decided it would be too much trouble to take down to bring to the show. So it stays stored until the next Depoe Bay messabout.

Mark


Mark Neuhaus
 

On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 3:05 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

You can see one in use here, and you can
also see why it's called a "ropewalk":

https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA

A nice little video, but they skip over some of the details, so parts of
the process look like magic. <g>

Thanks for the link, I hadn't seen that one before.  I have watched 10 to 20 videos, including the Lego one.  Even one to make a multi-colored jump rope out of yarn.  It's interesting to see the differences in techniques. Sounds like I should go ahead and experiment to find a setup that will work at a messabout.

Mark 
 


 

Please do some experimenting, Mark. A bench-size model ropewalk might be a good size for messabouts and shows. Or maybe a short, small full size one. You're in charge! ;o)

One of the Retired Old Geezers suggested that knot tying and/or deck work (belaying, cleat hitch, etc.) demos might be good. Could be aimed at youngsters...

On 1/11/2021 5:49 PM, Mark N wrote:
...
https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA <https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA>
...
Thanks for the link, I hadn't seen that one before.  I have watched 10 to 20 videos, including the Lego one.  Even one to make a multi-colored jump rope out of yarn.  It's interesting to see the differences in techniques. Sounds like I should go ahead and experiment to find a setup that will work at a messabout.
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Richard Green
 

Yes. One thing I notice is how many boaters haven’t the slightest about a proper cleat off and basically tie knots into them rendering them traumatic to undo.

On Jan 11, 2021, at 10:55 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Please do some experimenting, Mark. A bench-size model ropewalk might be a good size for messabouts and shows. Or maybe a short, small full size one. You're in charge! ;o)

One of the Retired Old Geezers suggested that knot tying and/or deck work (belaying, cleat hitch, etc.) demos might be good. Could be aimed at youngsters...

On 1/11/2021 5:49 PM, Mark N wrote:
...
https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA <https://youtu.be/IaHQUvG8jzA>
...
Thanks for the link, I hadn't seen that one before. I have watched 10 to 20 videos, including the Lego one. Even one to make a multi-colored jump rope out of yarn. It's interesting to see the differences in techniques. Sounds like I should go ahead and experiment to find a setup that will work at a messabout.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
When we all think alike, we don't need to think much at all. (Walt Whitman)


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There's disagreement about what's the "proper" way to do a cleat hitch. Whoever does the display will have to be prepared to break up fistfights over who's way is right. ;o) Let's knot put Dan from Almostcanada in charge. <g>

I'm, pretty sure it was at the Columbia River Maritime Museum where I saw a display with lengths of line, a cleat, and something to tie knots around. There was a panel with illustrations of one "proper" way to do a cleat hitch, and various simple knots. Visitors could play around without anybody supervising (the lines were too short for anybody to hang themselves).

On 1/12/2021 8:10 AM, Rich G wrote:
Yes. One thing I notice is how many boaters haven’t the slightest about a proper cleat off and basically tie knots into them rendering them traumatic to undo.
...
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cherrill boissonou
 

I think the goal when tiring to a cleat is that the dock line should be quick to make fast and just as quick to undo........after all: “the tie that binds can be unfortunate when it’s time to leave!”
Earl🧙‍♂️⚓️

On Jan 12, 2021, at 2:11 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

There's disagreement about what's the "proper" way to do a cleat hitch. Whoever does the display will have to be prepared to break up fistfights over who's way is right. ;o) Let's knot put Dan from Almostcanada in charge. <g>

I'm, pretty sure it was at the Columbia River Maritime Museum where I saw a display with lengths of line, a cleat, and something to tie knots around. There was a panel with illustrations of one "proper" way to do a cleat hitch, and various simple knots. Visitors could play around without anybody supervising (the lines were too short for anybody to hang themselves).

On 1/12/2021 8:10 AM, Rich G wrote:
Yes. One thing I notice is how many boaters haven’t the slightest about a proper cleat off and basically tie knots into them rendering them traumatic to undo.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The world is changed not by the self-regarding, but by men and women prepared to make fools of themselves. (P.D. James)


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