Topics

Cedar oar work


dan mulholland
 



Some pictures of progress- this one is of the blanks, cut from one 2X4, the diagonal cut done with this wonderful saw.



Below, the oars are sanded and shaped using this classic plane, probably the first time it's been used in 50-60 years, blade still sharp.



After planing ,sanding, and cutting in the handles.   In this picture, the insect damage can be seen, this will be filled in with epoxy thickened with wood flour.



Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted. 



Next, will work to make the handles smaller- they're great for me, but not for smaller hands.  And, stare at them a bit- debate whether to make the oars thinner.  Then, need to color match the epoxy and fill the holes, and epoxy in the blades.  And glass them in the oarlock area, too. Oars are lightweight, as desired.

Dan




































Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Very nice Dan. Thanks for sharing.
-Jove

On Thu, Feb 11, 2021 at 5:29 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:


Some pictures of progress- this one is of the blanks, cut from one 2X4, the diagonal cut done with this wonderful saw.



Below, the oars are sanded and shaped using this classic plane, probably the first time it's been used in 50-60 years, blade still sharp.



After planing ,sanding, and cutting in the handles.   In this picture, the insect damage can be seen, this will be filled in with epoxy thickened with wood flour.



Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted. 



Next, will work to make the handles smaller- they're great for me, but not for smaller hands.  And, stare at them a bit- debate whether to make the oars thinner.  Then, need to color match the epoxy and fill the holes, and epoxy in the blades.  And glass them in the oarlock area, too. Oars are lightweight, as desired.

Dan




































cherrill boissonou
 

......making good progress, Dan. I guess you already know not to put any finish on the grips.....thought I’d say just in case. Looking forward to the finished product.
Earl


On Feb 11, 2021, at 5:29 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:



Some pictures of progress- this one is of the blanks, cut from one 2X4, the diagonal cut done with this wonderful saw.

<IMG_0479.jpg>

Below, the oars are sanded and shaped using this classic plane, probably the first time it's been used in 50-60 years, blade still sharp.

<IMG_0480.jpg>

After planing ,sanding, and cutting in the handles.   In this picture, the insect damage can be seen, this will be filled in with epoxy thickened with wood flour.

<IMG_0482.jpg>

Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted. 

<IMG_0484.jpg>

Next, will work to make the handles smaller- they're great for me, but not for smaller hands.  And, stare at them a bit- debate whether to make the oars thinner.  Then, need to color match the epoxy and fill the holes, and epoxy in the blades.  And glass them in the oarlock area, too. Oars are lightweight, as desired.

Dan




































 

Looks real good, Dan. Using the Gaco blades sure makes shaping the oars easier. When I talked to you at the Ceremony Saturday I hadn't realized that the shafts finished as a straight taper, with no additional shaping, other than the handles.

Those old planes are sure nice when they're set up right. :o)

Is the slot for the blade parallel to the forward face of the shaft?

Light weight is nice, but balance is important too. When placed in the oarlocks of your boat, ready to row, the oars should be just a _little_ blade heavy, so you have to press down lightly on the handles to balance them. It's probably a good idea not to put the finish on until you check the balance, in case you have to shave the inboard ends of the shafts to lighten them. making them heavier is easier -- drill a hole in the handle and add some weight. McMullen has something to say about it (of course <g>):

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?119539-Adding-Counterbalancing-Weights-to-Oars

https://flic.kr/p/dEVYPs

Now that I've seen how straightforward making the Gaco oars is, I ought make a pair for Whimsy. It looks like the their plan could be used with homemade blades, even flat ones:

https://gacooarlocks.com/gaco-oars.html

On 2/11/2021 5:29 PM, dan wrote:
Some pictures of progress...
Here's where they are now, with the blade slot cut and blade inserted.
...
Oars are lightweight, as desired.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Never lose a chance of saying a kind word. (William Makepeace Thackeray)
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I'd forgotten about the video of a scientific comparison of the Gaco oarlocks and conventional ones. They just go on and on and on... <g>

https://duckworks.com/1-2-gaco-oarlock-sets/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal. If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle... they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for them by gasoline. (Theodore Roosevelt)

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dan mulholland
 

John,

To answer the question of "is the blade parallel to the front of the oar"....I hope so.    It is parallel to the long side of the oar, which faces the oarlock post, aft side when rowing, which means front to me.  I just grabbed the little Porter Cable circular saw, with the angle previously set for the diagonal cut, and went for it.

As you can see, once the rip cuts are made on the table saw, and the diagonal cut with a circular saw, that's most of the shaping.  The next step was/is to place the larger of the two shafts to be the same size as the smaller one.   Then, planed to remove cutting marks from the ripping.  After that, I used the plane to round over the corners per instructions for "diameter", and hand sanded from there.

It was a good way to get warm in an unheated garage.

Dan


dan mulholland
 

A note about the Gacooarlocks oar plans.   John Murrays' thoughts "evolved" some over time, it appears.  In the build instructions, he says to cut the blade end of the oars at a diagonal and attach the blade to that surface.  Elsewhere, he mentions "knocking" the blades in place, which didn't make sense to me.  When he sent a message about the order, the oar shaft to blade join is done as I did, with a slot, and the tangs of the fork shaped to meet the blade.   Then, "knocking", Australian for push?  made sense.  I like this better, may be stronger, looks good.  I intend to paint both oar blades the same color, though, hope they still work that way.

Dan




 

"Knocking" in British slang means a certain physical interaction between a man and a woman. Same in Oz? A quick look around the Interweb found that the answer is yep:

"knocking shop (plural knocking shops) (chiefly Australia, Britain, New Zealand, slang) A brothel"

Paint one blade red and the other green, so you don't get confused. <g>

On 2/12/2021 8:23 PM, dan wrote:
...
Then, "knocking", Australian for push?  made sense. I like this better, may be stronger, looks good.  I intend to paint both oar blades the same color, though, hope they still work that way.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I once knew a writer who, after saying beautiful things about the sea, passed through a Pacific hurricane, and he became a changed man. (Joshua Slocum)
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Richard Green
 

I figured knocking in that usage meant a hammer and a few taps as needed.

Rich

On Feb 13, 2021, at 3:24 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

"Knocking" in British slang means a certain physical interaction between a man and a woman. Same in Oz? A quick look around the Interweb found that the answer is yep:

"knocking shop (plural knocking shops) (chiefly Australia, Britain, New Zealand, slang) A brothel"

Paint one blade red and the other green, so you don't get confused. <g>

On 2/12/2021 8:23 PM, dan wrote:
...
Then, "knocking", Australian for push? made sense. I like this better, may be stronger, looks good. I intend to paint both oar blades the same color, though, hope they still work that way.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I once knew a writer who, after saying beautiful things about the sea, passed through a Pacific hurricane, and he became a changed man. (Joshua Slocum)


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Jamie Orr
 

Richard, you're most likely right.  British slang is not consistent.  A common expression is (or was when I was younger) "I'll knock you up in the morning." Meaning I will contact you in the morning.

I took the same meaning from it as you did.  I mean, I just can't picture how that's gonna work using John's interpretation! 


On Sat., 13 Feb. 2021 at 8:29 p.m., Richard Green
<chaos5@...> wrote:
I figured knocking in that usage meant a hammer and a few taps as needed.

Rich

> On Feb 13, 2021, at 3:24 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
>
> "Knocking" in British slang means a certain physical interaction between a man and a woman. Same in Oz? A quick look around the Interweb found that the answer is yep:
>
> "knocking shop (plural knocking shops) (chiefly Australia, Britain, New Zealand, slang) A brothel"
>
> Paint one blade red and the other green, so you don't get confused. <g>
>
> On 2/12/2021 8:23 PM, dan wrote:
>> ...
>> Then, "knocking", Australian for push?  made sense. I like this better, may be stronger, looks good.  I intend to paint both oar blades the same color, though, hope they still work that way.
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> I once knew a writer who, after saying beautiful things about the sea, passed through a Pacific hurricane, and he became a changed man. (Joshua Slocum)
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>







 

Well, that was fun, but here's what the instructions say about "knocking". Dan put his blades in slits in the shaft, but the instructions just say to screw and glue them to the back of the shaft. One screw, then "knock" the blade into alignment and let the goo cure:

"The blade: Can be home made or bought (Gaco is one source). It is best attached to the back of the shaft with one screw and epoxy bog. Now knock the blade into alignment and allow the glue to set."

One of the sea songs I listen to has this line:

"When I was a young man in my prime
I'd knock those yeller girls two at a time"

And that's _not_ from the "Uncensored Sailor Songs" disc. <g>

On 2/13/2021 8:53 PM, Jamie wrote:
Richard, you're most likely right.  British slang is not consistent.  A common expression is (or was when I was younger) "I'll knock you up in the morning." Meaning I will contact you in the morning.
I took the same meaning from it as you did.  I mean, I just can't picture how that's gonna work using John's interpretation!
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It is only great souls that know how much glory there is in being good. (Sophocles)
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Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Not sure if it's the same in OZ, but In the UK and Ireland Knock usually means a light blow, or "tap". you could knock a nail in with a hammer, or knock something into alignment.
I've not heard of knocking in a sexual reference, except for "getting knocked up".
knockers meant boobs where I grew up in Ireland.
-Jove


On Sun, Feb 14, 2021 at 9:32 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Well, that was fun, but here's what the instructions say about
"knocking". Dan put his blades in slits in the shaft, but the
instructions just say to screw and glue them to the back of the shaft.
One screw, then "knock" the blade into alignment and let the goo cure:

"The blade: Can be home made or bought (Gaco is one source). It is best
attached to the back of the shaft with one screw and epoxy bog. Now
knock the blade into alignment and allow the glue to set."

One of the sea songs I listen to has this line:

"When I was a young man in my prime
I'd knock those yeller girls two at a time"

And that's _not_ from the "Uncensored Sailor Songs" disc. <g>

On 2/13/2021 8:53 PM, Jamie wrote:
> Richard, you're most likely right.  British slang is not consistent.  A
> common expression is (or was when I was younger) "I'll knock you up in
> the morning." Meaning I will contact you in the morning.
>
> I took the same meaning from it as you did.  I mean, I just can't
> picture how that's gonna work using John's interpretation!
--
John <jkohnen@...>
It is only great souls that know how much glory there is in being good.
(Sophocles)


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