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Any Authors Out There?


 

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.

"Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters and members make of it. Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely get in the next issue. Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!

"John Weiss
TSCA Chapter Coordinator"

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)


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Richard Green
 

What are the parameters, if any?

Rich

On Nov 25, 2020, at 3:26 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.

"Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters and members make of it. Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely get in the next issue. Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!

"John Weiss
TSCA Chapter Coordinator"

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)


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The articles should be about boating, boatbuilding, boat repair, boat gadgets, etc. that can be considered to be related to a _loose_ definition of "traditional small craft". For example, they accepted an article from Andrew on Puddle Ducks. Of course articles on historic small boats and historic activities are very welcome too. The TSCA used to be snobs* about sail and oar, or paddle, craft, in fact it's even in their "mission" statement, but I think they should loosen up a bit and embrace old-fashioned, low-powered motorboats, and their electric cousins. Sending articles about such boats, maybe Dan P's Ginger, to the Ash Breeze might break the ice.

andy@marinermedia.com

*The TSCA is much less snobby nowadays than they used to be. Our NW chapters aren't snobby at all! :o)

On 11/25/2020 4:20 PM, Rich G wrote:
What are the parameters, if any?

The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I just think it's rather odd that a nation that prides itself on its virility should feel compelled to strap on forty pounds of protective gear just in order to play rugby. (Rupert Giles on American football)
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Richard Green
 

Ah, the only thing historic around here is me……

Rich

On Nov 25, 2020, at 4:40 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

The articles should be about boating, boatbuilding, boat repair, boat gadgets, etc. that can be considered to be related to a _loose_ definition of "traditional small craft". For example, they accepted an article from Andrew on Puddle Ducks. Of course articles on historic small boats and historic activities are very welcome too. The TSCA used to be snobs* about sail and oar, or paddle, craft, in fact it's even in their "mission" statement, but I think they should loosen up a bit and embrace old-fashioned, low-powered motorboats, and their electric cousins. Sending articles about such boats, maybe Dan P's Ginger, to the Ash Breeze might break the ice.

andy@marinermedia.com

*The TSCA is much less snobby nowadays than they used to be. Our NW chapters aren't snobby at all! :o)

On 11/25/2020 4:20 PM, Rich G wrote:
What are the parameters, if any?
The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)

Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>

"Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash Breeze. This month he's falling a bit short again. If you have any stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities, please send them to Andy at andy@marinermedia.com. Pass this to all your members as well.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I just think it's rather odd that a nation that prides itself on its virility should feel compelled to strap on forty pounds of protective gear just in order to play rugby. (Rupert Giles on American football)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






 

Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.

"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."

Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.

Our steamer friends:

https://www.northweststeamsociety.org/

On 11/25/2020 5:40 PM, John W wrote:
Yes, the last sentence in the TSCA "mission statement" is
     "We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."
Electric powered boats certainly come under this umbrella.  Power boats are more the domain of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, but TSCA has never denied admission to a powered small boat.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican. (H. L. Mencken)
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Myles Twete
 

The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.

Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.

There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Any Authors Out There?

Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.

"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."

Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.

Our steamer friends:

https://www.northweststeamsociety.org/

On 11/25/2020 5:40 PM, John W wrote:
Yes, the last sentence in the TSCA "mission statement" is

"We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats,
and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of
traditional designs."

Electric powered boats certainly come under this umbrella. Power
boats are more the domain of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, but
TSCA has never denied admission to a powered small boat.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican. (H. L. Mencken)


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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


John Weiss
 

FWIW, I added this to the description on our Facebook page:

"Sail, rowing, and paddle craft using fiberglass, epoxy, carbon, Kevlar, etc. are all welcome! "Small" MAY mean trailerable, hand-launchable, or significantly smaller than the USS Nimitz... We just want to make "boat" a verb!"

On 11/25/20 20:23, Myles Twete wrote:
The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.
"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."
Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.


Roger Padvorac
 

John,
For the most part, writers and editors have different personalities, and you have a writer personality.
 
You have interesting knowledge about a wide variety of boating subjects, and have opinions about many aspects of life.
 
What you need is an editor to turn some of your verbal meanderings into essays.
 
For instance, you know more about sailing in wind tunnels than most people do, especially since most people haven't heard of this. By this I mean sailing on the Columbia or Strait of Juan de Fuca. There are other wind-tunnel rivers like this and it would be good for people to know about this before they go sailing in them.
 
Yes, people usually say you go sailing on a river. However, if its a wind tunnel, you are sailing in the tunnel, and if you are inexperienced, you have a good chance of sailing in the river.
 
People who are interested in everything about sailing would find an essay about this to be interesting, even if they won't ever go sailing in a location like this.
 
* * * *
I'm at the opposite end of the human spectrum from editors.
 
While I'm good at technical writing, I find arm-waving, populist, political writing to be a lot more fun.
 
I'm the kind of person who survived their last year in the marines by going to a lot of Grateful Dead concerts, including an amazing all-weekend concert on the shore of the Pacific Ocean. If I'd reenlisted, they would have sent me to officers candidate school so there was less people I could be insubordinate to.
 
I'm discovering its impossible for me to write a fair description of the kind of personality, who highly values the correct use of grammar. I haven't gotten along well with editors in the past. Maybe I haven't had the chance to work with a truly talented editor.
 
All I can say is that we would have very little worth reading, without editors, and so they provide an essential role in society. Yes, this is damning with faint praise, but its the best I can do. Meticulous attention to grammar is incompatible with a deadhead marine, who thinks being a demagogue would be fun :)
 
* * * *
Lots of people write very badly, and a good editor is how they end up being published. There is a short list of fiction writers that I reread, and several of them praise the support they received from their editor, so I know good editors are out there, somewhere.
 
What you need is to find a person, not like me, to turn you into a published writer.
 
Sincerely,
Roger
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Kohnen" <jkohnen@...>
To: "Oregon Coots" <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 3:26 PM
Subject: [oregoncoots] Any Authors Out There?

> The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even
> printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)
>
> Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>
>
> "Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash
> Breeze.  This month he's falling a bit short again.  If you have any
> stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities,
> please send them to Andy at
andy@....  Pass this to all
> your members as well.
>
> "Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters
> and members make of it.  Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely
> get in the next issue.  Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will
> always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!
>
> "John Weiss
> TSCA Chapter Coordinator"
>
> --
> John <
jkohnen@...>
> It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the
> maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
>
https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>