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A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades


dan mulholland
 

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


cherrill boissonou
 

Dan,
If you look at the top middle line from end to end, it looks like pair of oars tapered thin end to butt with one butt showing in front and the other at the back. 🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️
Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:36 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.


<Gaco Oar Diagram.png>


I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


cherrill boissonou
 

Dan,
Looking again I see from a head on view of the cross section it is not a rectangle, rather it is slanted parallelogram. I know I’m not answering your question......just letting you know what I see. There’s an allusion that the long side view would show an angled cut off at each end, but I think the angle is 90 degrees.
🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 7:09 PM, cherrill boissonou via groups.io <cboissonou@...> wrote:

Dan,
If you look at the top middle line from end to end, it looks like pair of oars tapered thin end to butt with one butt showing in front and the other at the back. 🧙‍♂️🌝⚓️
Earl


On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:36 PM, dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:

OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.


<Gaco Oar Diagram.png>


I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


dan mulholland
 

of course, he's talking about the blade of the saw, not the oar!


From: Dan Mulholland
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 6:36 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades
 
OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Yes, I agree he's talking about the saw blade.
first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given, then cut down the middle at a slight angle (a slightly tricky cut you'll need to have a carrier board or a taper attached). Looks like he actually recommends a hand held circular saw.
The looms are nested in the board thing end to thin end.
The NOTE WELL is saying.... make sure you don't cut 2 parallelograms, but instead lean your blad opposite so you cut 2 trapezoids.
In my experience saws only lean one way, so you'll have to flip the board.
-Jove



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:02 PM dan mulholland <mulhollanddr@...> wrote:
of course, he's talking about the blade of the saw, not the oar!


From: Dan Mulholland
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 6:36 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: A trick question- Cedar oar shafts for oars, and the oar blades
 
OK, here's a test question, from the Gaco oarlocks division, in Australia.  The oar shafts are to be cut from a full dimension 2" by 4", per this diagram.  The question is, what does the "NOTE WELL" mean?    The diagram is an optical illusion, after 1 libation of your choice.




I think it means that the longer surface of the shaft- shown as 3 1/4"- is vertical to the oarlock when the oar is in the water, so the blade would be parallel to that.  This conclusion is based on staring at pictures of the oar, not the math question above.

Hmmm.


Dan


Mark Neuhaus
 



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:22 PM Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:

first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given,

If I'm reading the instructions correctly in this link, it's 10 degrees, no?

 
Mark


 

Dan tricked us by showing us that confusing illustration. <sigh> <g> It all becomes clear when you look at the entire instructions. First cut the 2x4 into a parallelogram, then you can cut it into two matching tapered “isosceles trapezoids”.

I eagerly await seeing Dan's new oars in action.

How's the boat coming along, Dan? Any pictures to show us?

On 2/2/2021 9:05 AM, Mark N wrote:
first you cut a parallelogram, Angle doesn't seem to be given,
If I'm reading the instructions correctly in this link, it's 10 degrees, no?
https://gacooarlocks.com/plans-for-making-oars.pdf
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning. (Catherine the Great)
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