A real Coot craft in Portland, even if a bit pricey.


David Luckhardt
 

2013 Devlin Lit' l Coot

US$ 20,000*



https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2013/devlin-lit-l-coot-3680521/?fbclid=IwAR0PS9oIx3NUpYox9adQGRkcYHexf3B-GgDU7w-4EjF0WLIMYzOv1AWcvvk


 

A Coot boat indeed! A little motorsailer, great for the Salish Sea. Bob L was drooling over that design before he settled on a building a Scamp. This may be the very same boat I climbed into at a Pocket Yacht Palooza some years ago. Nice boat. My checkbook isn't big enough. <g>

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

On 1/7/2021 9:49 AM, Thorne wrote:
2013 Devlin Lit' l Coot
US$ 20,000*
Portland, <https://www.yachtworld.com/boats-for-sale/region-northamerica/country-united-states/state-oregon/city-portland/>Oregon
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
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David Graybeal
 

Love the boat. The price seems... ambitious.


Richard Green
 

First thing I look for and did not find is a place to sleep in comfort.  There’s a boat named “Coot” for sale, 25’ long, in Seattle right now for 50k asking.   I don’t think the interiors of either boat were particularly well designed in the interiors.  IMHO.

Rich


Lee Tapper
 

I did the same.  If it’s intended to be a day sailor I’m not sure it needs the fancy cabin.

 

Lee

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Green
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 3:16 PM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] A real Coot craft in Portland, even if a bit pricey.

 

First thing I look for and did not find is a place to sleep in comfort.  There’s a boat named “Coot” for sale, 25’ long, in Seattle right now for 50k asking.   I don’t think the interiors of either boat were particularly well designed in the interiors.  IMHO.

 


 

You're supposed to sleep up in the bow. When I saw the boat, it didn't look like the owner had done anything to develop that area. Probably just using an air mattress. The sleeping area was my only big gripe about the design, but it's hard to cram everything into an 18' boat. For a singlehanded voyager I think something could be done in the sleeping area so you could keep a bed made up, and not have to kick it out of the way to steer with the inside wheel. I liked the boat, and I think I could enjoy cruising the Salish Sea in one.

https://devlinboat.com/litl-coot-18-bilge-keel/

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

On 1/7/2021 3:17 PM, Lee T wrote:
I did the same.  If it’s intended to be a day sailor I’m not sure it needs the fancy cabin.
*Richard Green
First thing I look for and did not find is a place to sleep in comfort.  There’s a boat named “Coot” for sale, 25’ long, in Seattle right now for 50k asking.   I don’t think the interiors of either boat were particularly well designed in the interiors.  IMHO.
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A self-taught man usually has a poor teacher and a worse student. (Henny Youngman)
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Richard Green
 

Yeah, being an old guy I get up too many times in the night and crawling off a mattress on the floor doesn’t look good on my resumé. Especially when with a little better (IMHO) design for interior two quarter berths coulda been built in that a person of uh, more advanced years could sleep well in. I had two seven foot bunks in my 16’ Jaunty plus one burner and sink. I confess it’s a gripe of mine that boat interiors have so little thought, just the same old, same old in even advanced designs. Mebbe gettin’ cranky in my old age.

Rich

On Jan 7, 2021, at 3:51 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

You're supposed to sleep up in the bow. When I saw the boat, it didn't look like the owner had done anything to develop that area. Probably just using an air mattress. The sleeping area was my only big gripe about the design, but it's hard to cram everything into an 18' boat. For a singlehanded voyager I think something could be done in the sleeping area so you could keep a bed made up, and not have to kick it out of the way to steer with the inside wheel. I liked the boat, and I think I could enjoy cruising the Salish Sea in one.

https://devlinboat.com/litl-coot-18-bilge-keel/

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

On 1/7/2021 3:17 PM, Lee T wrote:
I did the same. If it’s intended to be a day sailor I’m not sure it needs the fancy cabin.
*Richard Green
First thing I look for and did not find is a place to sleep in comfort. There’s a boat named “Coot” for sale, 25’ long, in Seattle right now for 50k asking. I don’t think the interiors of either boat were particularly well designed in the interiors. IMHO.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A self-taught man usually has a poor teacher and a worse student. (Henny Youngman)


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Richard Green
 

Otherwise, any one of us would look good driving that boat across the Puget Sound. I’m sure of that.

Rich

On Jan 7, 2021, at 5:18 PM, Richard Green <chaos5@viclink.com> wrote:

Yeah, being an old guy I get up too many times in the night and crawling off a mattress on the floor doesn’t look good on my resumé. Especially when with a little better (IMHO) design for interior two quarter berths coulda been built in that a person of uh, more advanced years could sleep well in. I had two seven foot bunks in my 16’ Jaunty plus one burner and sink. I confess it’s a gripe of mine that boat interiors have so little thought, just the same old, same old in even advanced designs. Mebbe gettin’ cranky in my old age.

Rich

On Jan 7, 2021, at 3:51 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

You're supposed to sleep up in the bow. When I saw the boat, it didn't look like the owner had done anything to develop that area. Probably just using an air mattress. The sleeping area was my only big gripe about the design, but it's hard to cram everything into an 18' boat. For a singlehanded voyager I think something could be done in the sleeping area so you could keep a bed made up, and not have to kick it out of the way to steer with the inside wheel. I liked the boat, and I think I could enjoy cruising the Salish Sea in one.

https://devlinboat.com/litl-coot-18-bilge-keel/

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

On 1/7/2021 3:17 PM, Lee T wrote:
I did the same. If it’s intended to be a day sailor I’m not sure it needs the fancy cabin.
*Richard Green
First thing I look for and did not find is a place to sleep in comfort. There’s a boat named “Coot” for sale, 25’ long, in Seattle right now for 50k asking. I don’t think the interiors of either boat were particularly well designed in the interiors. IMHO.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
A self-taught man usually has a poor teacher and a worse student. (Henny Youngman)


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IMO, the priority in a small cruising boat is a good place to sleep. Not a bunch of places to sleep, just one or two. We've all seen small boats set up to sleep a whole slew of people. If anybody ever really tried it, they never did gain. ;o)

Another fault is making room to cook and wash dishes inside. Unless you're crossing an ocean, and even then in fair weather, it's better to cook and do kitchen chores out in the cockpit, rather than steaming up the cabin. It's also easier to clean up the cockpit than your bunk after you spill the stew. <g> A 22' Atkin motorcruiser turned up at Port Townsend one year. A sensible boat to start with, sporting only two berths by design, and room in the cabin for an alcohol stove for cooking. The builder enclosed the wheelhouse and put a galley on the cockpit side of the bulkhead. An excellent idea:

http://boat-links.com/PT/PT2003/Loon-1.jpg

http://boat-links.com/PT/PT2003/Loon-3.jpg

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Cruisers/Bamaling.html

Perhaps Lit'l Coot could be improved by doing away with everything in the cabin and putting in one decent bunk on the port side, maybe with the foot up under the foredeck (I don't recall if there's room without doing that). In a pinch, a second person could sleep on the st'b'rd side under the foredeck, but usually that area would be used for storage. Some sensible built in storage, and chart table, could be put behind the helm seat. Passengers could sit on the bunk in bad weather. Cooking and kitchen chores would be done in the cockpit, under a boom tent or bimini if it rains.

I like Lit'l Coot, but if my checkbook was thick enough to buy the one in Portland, or even thicker and I had Sam build me one, I'd make some modifications to the interior to make it a better single-handed cruiser.

https://devlinboat.com/litl-coot-18-bilge-keel/

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

On 1/7/2021 5:18 PM, Rich G wrote:
Yeah, being an old guy I get up too many times in the night and crawling off a mattress on the floor doesn’t look good on my resumé. Especially when with a little better (IMHO) design for interior two quarter berths coulda been built in that a person of uh, more advanced years could sleep well in. I had two seven foot bunks in my 16’ Jaunty plus one burner and sink. I confess it’s a gripe of mine that boat interiors have so little thought, just the same old, same old in even advanced designs. Mebbe gettin’ cranky in my old age.
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When I was a boy I was told that anybody could become President; I'm beginning to believe it. (Clarence Darrow)
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Looking at the study plan in Devlin's Web pages and comparing to the boat in Portland, it looks like the cabin seats have been moved forward, to right where somebody's head would be if they were trying to sleep where the plan shows! I now remember noticing that during the Palooza. That boat, as built, is worthless as a cruiser, and if it's not a cruiser, what's the point? Sam doesn't show the built in sink and whatever behind the seats, because the seats are supposed to be there. Easy enough to rip everything out and start from scratch. I think I'd leave the helm seat forward, but make it easily removable if you really had to make room for somebody else to sleep.

https://devlinboat.com/litl-coot-18-bilge-keel/

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3bc65m9

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A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


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