hand crank outboard


Electri-Cal
 

To try out the clamp on a prop, and cranked by hand concept, -- I'm serious by the way -- Grab an oar or 2 X 4, tie it to the dock with rope, and see how long you can swing that in a pattern like a yuloh, or try cranking a 2 inch wood drill bit with a hand cranked drill, and time how many minutes  or holes you can do, over say the 10- 15 minutes it could take to dock in some evening gusts, after a day sail.   Not being obtuse, but it will cost as much to buy a setup for cranking, as a small electric base motor, and I'll bet you would rather handle the boat than sit there cranking while also steering, getting lines, pushing off or etc. into the slip.  I have "dawn rowed" from Richardson to the small beach beyond the dam, where coots meet as a fun row, that was about 1 1/2 hours and maybe 1 mile, and a few years back

I did see a good shaft drive, with a Minn Kota prop and cable connection, that uses an electric drill with the larger batteries, that might work.  Got plans for one of those, but I'm kinda fond of using both hands to dock, and don't think the old joints really enjoy rowing except as an occasional fun project.  Also a good electric "mud motor" or stinger might be a good option, if sorta invasive.  Thanks for the ideas, I have been meaning to use the big sweeps I made for Surprise a  few years ago.  Not this show, as the rear deck has to be removed, and the seat moved to centerline to row.  Best for my age is electric, a friend along, or a good book, and a good sound system, on a sunny day,  

Later, See you there ----- Cal



Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Andrew, are you suggesting there's a difference between 4 horse power and 100 Watts?
:)

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 2:09 PM Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:
There's a reason outboards are so powerful and use so much gas


On 4/15/2021 11:38 AM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
> Thanks John,
> I've always been intrigued with the idea of sculling, I've seen videos
> of people moving 35 ft sailboats with a 14' oar at around 1.5 knots.
> Great for getting in and out of the dock, or as a backup.
> and I'm sure very effective on a small trailer sailor. I use greenland
> style kayak paddles I made and I like to scull myself sideways. It's
> very effective.
> I like that device for attaching to an oar. it's a good idea.
> basically it makes a yuloh from an oar. I might try something like that.
>
> Sculling side draw kayak:
> https://youtu.be/WJt_8GxmHu0?t=49 <https://youtu.be/WJt_8GxmHu0?t=49>
> Thanks for the tips.
> -Jove
>
> On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 8:18 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...
> <mailto:jkohnen@...>> wrote:
>
>     Andrew tried a crank outboard out at a Depoe bay show, they're not
>     a new
>     idea. It didn't look like it worked very well. But maybe that was
>     just
>     because of the operator. <g> Mighta worked better if the propeller
>     shaft
>     was closer to horizontal...
>
>     https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9 <https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9>
>
>     https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S <https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S>
>







Andrew Linn
 

There's a reason outboards are so powerful and use so much gas

On 4/15/2021 11:38 AM, Jove Lachman-Curl wrote:
Thanks John,
I've always been intrigued with the idea of sculling, I've seen videos of people moving 35 ft sailboats with a 14' oar at around 1.5 knots. Great for getting in and out of the dock, or as a backup.
and I'm sure very effective on a small trailer sailor. I use greenland style kayak paddles I made and I like to scull myself sideways. It's very effective.
I like that device for attaching to an oar. it's a good idea. basically it makes a yuloh from an oar. I might try something like that.

Sculling side draw kayak:
https://youtu.be/WJt_8GxmHu0?t=49 <https://youtu.be/WJt_8GxmHu0?t=49>
Thanks for the tips.
-Jove

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 8:18 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com <mailto:jkohnen@boat-links.com>> wrote:

Andrew tried a crank outboard out at a Depoe bay show, they're not
a new
idea. It didn't look like it worked very well. But maybe that was
just
because of the operator. <g> Mighta worked better if the propeller
shaft
was closer to horizontal...

https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9 <https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9>

https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S <https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S>


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Thanks John,
I've always been intrigued with the idea of sculling, I've seen videos of people moving 35 ft sailboats with a 14' oar at around 1.5 knots. Great for getting in and out of the dock, or as a backup.
and I'm sure very effective on a small trailer sailor. I use greenland style kayak paddles I made and I like to scull myself sideways. It's very effective.
I like that device for attaching to an oar. it's a good idea. basically it makes a yuloh from an oar. I might try something like that.

Sculling side draw kayak:
-Jove

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 8:18 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Andrew tried a crank outboard out at a Depoe bay show, they're not a new
idea. It didn't look like it worked very well. But maybe that was just
because of the operator. <g> Mighta worked better if the propeller shaft
was closer to horizontal...

https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9

https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S

Except for the storage problem, I think a sculling oar would work better
for a fairly heavy boat. Duckworks sells carbon fiber ferrules to make
two-piece oars:

https://duckworks.com/pair-of-carbon-fiber-ferrules-for-oars/

They also sell the Scullmatix. "a simple device to make sculling a boat
almost automatic." I think Jim Ballou bought one, but I never tried
it... You make your oar two-piece to use it with a Scullmatix, so it may
kill two birds with one stone:

https://duckworks.com/scullmatix/

On 4/14/2021 11:47 AM, Jove wrote:
> Has anyone tried one of these?
> https://www.axamarine.com/hand-propeller-outboard

> There are cheaper ones on amazon.

> <https://www.amazon.com/BRIS-OPERATED-PROPELLERS-INFLATABLE-OUTBOARD/dp/B01HLSLJU8/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=hand+crank+outboard+motor&qid=1618425913&s=books&sr=1-1>

> Seems like a great solution for a small sailboat like my windrose 18,
> But I'm curious if anyone has any experience with this concept.
--
John <jkohnen@...>
As for myself, the wonderful sea charmed me from the first. (Joshua Slocum)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com







 

Andrew tried a crank outboard out at a Depoe bay show, they're not a new idea. It didn't look like it worked very well. But maybe that was just because of the operator. <g> Mighta worked better if the propeller shaft was closer to horizontal...

https://flic.kr/p/cjiwP9

https://flic.kr/p/cjix9S

Except for the storage problem, I think a sculling oar would work better for a fairly heavy boat. Duckworks sells carbon fiber ferrules to make two-piece oars:

https://duckworks.com/pair-of-carbon-fiber-ferrules-for-oars/

They also sell the Scullmatix. "a simple device to make sculling a boat almost automatic." I think Jim Ballou bought one, but I never tried it... You make your oar two-piece to use it with a Scullmatix, so it may kill two birds with one stone:

https://duckworks.com/scullmatix/

On 4/14/2021 11:47 AM, Jove wrote:
Has anyone tried one of these?
https://www.axamarine.com/hand-propeller-outboard
There are cheaper ones on amazon.
<https://www.amazon.com/BRIS-OPERATED-PROPELLERS-INFLATABLE-OUTBOARD/dp/B01HLSLJU8/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=hand+crank+outboard+motor&qid=1618425913&s=books&sr=1-1>
Seems like a great solution for a small sailboat like my windrose 18, But I'm curious if anyone has any experience with this concept.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
As for myself, the wonderful sea charmed me from the first. (Joshua Slocum)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Has anyone tried one of these?
https://www.axamarine.com/hand-propeller-outboard
There are cheaper ones on amazon.
image.png
Seems like a great solution for a small sailboat like my windrose 18, But I'm curious if anyone has any experience with this concept.
-Jove