Windmills used to pump bilges


 

A perusal of the Marhst-L archive came up with this:

Bill Bunting:

"Although the North Atlantic is one of the most hazardous of oceans the American-built ships that ended up in the Canadian/UK timber trade in the late 1800s were usually well into their dotage and under another flag, very often Norwegian and thus fitted with a windmill pump, per Norwegian law. I suspect that many had previously been under a German flag -- when American square-riggers had lost the blush of youth they were commonly sold at Hamburg into the trans-Atlantic barreled oil trade, which was a year-round trade. German captains were very proud of their "petroleum klippers“ and particularly liked the commodious cabins."

I wonder what the Norwegian law was about. Surely it wouldn't have required wind-powered pumps on all sailing ships, no matter their afe and condition. But one would probably have to be able to read Norwegian to find out. <g>

Jim Shuttleworth:

"The windmill is probably an Onker. A SCANDINAVIAN device to pump the
bilge. I have a painting of Dashing Wave with one, 1902, inbound off San Francisco by C. Volquards. I have seen photos of other vessels with them. There were many Scandinavian sailors on US West Coast."

A separate search of the Interweb found an article claiming that Dashing Wave's windmill was her skipper's (named Morehouse -- not very Scandihoovian) invention, but I'll bet he cribbed the idea from the Norwegians. <g>

http://cablecarguy.blogspot.com/2011/01/windmill-at-sea-january-27-2011.html

Another image of an ancient ship with a windmill pump:

https://www.windmillworld.com/world/newzealand/ships.htm

On 2/19/2021 6:36 AM, Pete L wrote:
now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...
"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."
Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water?
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult. (E. B. White)
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Pete Leenhouts
 

now, here is an interesting sentence from the book "A Floating Home"...

"A barque, such as is often bought by a Norwegian trader in timber, and spends her remaining days being pumped out by a windmill on deck..."

Any local knowledge on using small windmills to pump bilge water? 

Wr/Pete
RIPTIDE  


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] lots of reading material on shipbuilding

John McCallum is "walking on air" because he discovered a glossary of
Duwamish words for the various parts of a canoe in the Survivor Library. :o)


Now he's just gotta find someone who can figure out how to pronounce them...

Thanks again, Myles.

On 2/16/2021 1:08 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
> Much more than just shipbuilding in this collection. Thanks, Myles.
>
>
> or
>
>

--
John <jkohnen@...>
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the
proportion. (Francis Bacon)


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