Topics

Depth finder info. needed


Electri-Cal
 

In trying to protect my twin props solidly mounted, I "cooked" up an idea or two.  I redid the bracket on the stern to swivel forward far enough to catch underwater stuff, IF -- I can interpret the screen angles !!   First, has anybody else tried this forward facing pickup, I haven't been in the water yet so I don't have a clue.  I really need a way to put a Humminbird sensor in the forward inside of the hull, behind the area that hits the beach first, gotta be inside or flush to the flat bottomed hull.

Next is the "rumor" that a clear bottomed plastic jar with mineral oil will show through a plastic hull ??  Not sure about that either.  I was told that wood stops reading anything, plywood has glue lines , etc.  However I could, "SHUDDER" drill a 3 inch hole and insert a fitted bottle with mineral oil much further forward to look down much more as intended.  Sure would like some input on possible ways to see the drt -- before the props encounter it about 16 feet  later.  John Kohnen and I stirred some red mud at Triangle lake last time, an early warning would help a lot.  Even at 5 mph stuff seems to rush right up to those props.

Help, any experienced info, really needed before I Try something stupid,  thanks,   Cal 


Electri-Cal
 

PS -- How about a small "Bolger Bulge" under the bow, in wood and glass, with a flush mount transducer in just the trailing edge a bit ??  Just now occurred to me, but would prefer a non bulge solution.  I can't be the only one who wants an early warning for exposed lower units.   Thanks,  Cal 


 

Cut through the plywood bottom from the top, until you reach the fiberglass sheathing, making a hole larger than the size of the transducer. Then fill the hole with epoxy. The transducer will shoot right through solid epoxy and glass. Then mount a bottomless jar, or homemade reservoir of some sort, on top of the epoxy, put the transducer in it and fill it with mineral oil. Seal up the top of the jar around the cable to the transducer, and Robert's your mother's brother. :o)

If you think you might not need to easily replace the transducer someday, instead of a jar, make a stiff epoxy putty and put a healthy glob on top of the filled hole, then squoosh the transducer down into it, being careful to be sure there are no gaps or bubbles between the transducer and putty.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

I've read of people mounting transducers inside _thin_ plywood bottoms without using the epoxy filled hole trick, and they worked, though with a loss of range. But who of us worries about whether our depthfinder only works to 175 ft. instead of 200 ft.? <g> You can do some experiments before cutting anything.

On 5/14/2020 6:27 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
PS -- How about a small "Bolger Bulge" under the bow, in wood and glass, with a flush mount transducer in just the trailing edge a bit ??  Just now occurred to me, but would prefer a non bulge solution.  I can't be the only one who wants an early warning for exposed lower units.  Thanks,  Cal
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I am going to try to pay attention to the spring. I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees. I am going to close my eyes and listen. (Anne Lamott)
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johnacord
 

Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with substantial hull thickness.

I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power output and frequency.

A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about. 

John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

John A.


 

I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with substantial hull thickness.
I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power output and frequency.
A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just be sure to fully saturate the cloth.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for. (Laurence J. Peter)
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Joe Novello
 

Here is my portable fish/depth finder for my Elegant Punt and Good Girl. 

The fish think I’m cheating. 

I bedded the transducer on my Catalina 25 in a big blob of silicone inside a piece of PVC inside the boat. So far it has been good down to 200 feet. 

Joe



On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


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--
Joe Novello


Joe Novello
 



On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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--
Joe Novello


Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

My sister had a large ferro cement hulled staysail schooner (well, large to my eyes)
It had a sonar which was mounted in a tube.  The sonar head could be lowered down
through the tube to look forward and positioned at various angles.
Much of the time it was raised above the bottom of the tube - which was flush to the
bottom of the boat.  This was good as one time the boat hit one of those huge logs which
float under the water and we could hear it rolling as the long keel proceeded over it
(no damage to the ferro cement keel) and since the sonar head was retracted
into the tube (not protruding down) it was not damaged. 
  One good use was coming in to a harbor/bay down an unmarked channel. 
The sonar showed the deep water and we had an easy go of it.
  Also, particularly when anchored down it was interesting seeing some rather
large fish below... and being impatient when none seemed to care at all for our bait.

This was in the San Juan Islands and also into Nanaimo and on to Princess Louisa
inlet.

Gerard Mittelstaedt
sadly now in south Texas
not in the glorious NW


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 5:41 PM Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com




--
Joe Novello



--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


Case Turner
 

Drill a hole in the bottom. Use a they hull transducer some sikaflex or boat life adhesive and be done with it. No weird boxes, oil, water, witches concoctions to deal with. No interference, no fuss.

Case

Sent from not here

On May 15, 2020, at 9:39 PM, Gerard Mittelstaedt <MITTEL48@...> wrote:


My sister had a large ferro cement hulled staysail schooner (well, large to my eyes)
It had a sonar which was mounted in a tube.  The sonar head could be lowered down
through the tube to look forward and positioned at various angles.
Much of the time it was raised above the bottom of the tube - which was flush to the
bottom of the boat.  This was good as one time the boat hit one of those huge logs which
float under the water and we could hear it rolling as the long keel proceeded over it
(no damage to the ferro cement keel) and since the sonar head was retracted
into the tube (not protruding down) it was not damaged. 
  One good use was coming in to a harbor/bay down an unmarked channel. 
The sonar showed the deep water and we had an easy go of it.
  Also, particularly when anchored down it was interesting seeing some rather
large fish below... and being impatient when none seemed to care at all for our bait.

This was in the San Juan Islands and also into Nanaimo and on to Princess Louisa
inlet.

Gerard Mittelstaedt
sadly now in south Texas
not in the glorious NW


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 5:41 PM Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:
<IMG_2013.jpg>


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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--
Joe Novello



--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


 

Good old PVC pipe. What would we do without it? <g>

On 5/15/2020 3:41 PM, Joe Novello wrote:
Here is my portable fish/depth finder for my Elegant Punt and Good Girl.
The fish think I’m cheating.
I bedded the transducer on my Catalina 25 in a big blob of silicone inside a piece of PVC inside the boat. So far it has been good down to 200 feet.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
We should not be simply fighting evil in the name of good, but struggling against the certainties of people who claim always to know where good and evil are to be found. (Tzvetan Todorov)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


 

1) One often has to send a transom mount transducer to the manufacturer to exchange it for a through-hull one.

2) A through-hull transducer can interfere with getting a boat on or off its trailer.

3) Some people don't like drilling a hole in their boat. <g>

On 5/15/2020 10:06 PM, Case wrote:
Drill a hole in the bottom. Use a they hull transducer some sikaflex or boat life adhesive and be done with it. No weird boxes, oil, water, witches concoctions to deal with. No interference, no fuss.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Usually, terrible things that are done with the excuse that progress requires them are not really progress at all, but just terrible things. (Russell Baker)
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Electri-Cal
 

ALL RIGHT Coots, a world of info.  love that  !!    I checked the current installation this morning, and the transducer, --- which is somewhat spotty over trolling speeds now, due to electrical motor static, --- is packaged with too many wires to spend time on it.   So, the tiime effective option is a hawkeye with their single hole dedicated forward sensor unit.  Easy to mount the small dial end close to line of sight on the dash.  The transducerthen is further from the EV system and only forward. that leaves the fish finder alone in the stern.  Mount  it where the trailer bunks miss the sensor.  That should do it, not as low cost, but better than hours rebraiding all the stuff that  I still use for real fishing. 

Thanks to all who replied ___  Cal 


Joe Novello
 

Here’s mine in action this morning. Don’t let the image fool you - they weren’t liking what I had to offer. Had to eat Hot cakes and eggs for my breakfast. 

On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 6:40 AM Electri-Cal <calboats@...> wrote:
ALL RIGHT Coots, a world of info.  love that  !!    I checked the current installation this morning, and the transducer, --- which is somewhat spotty over trolling speeds now, due to electrical motor static, --- is packaged with too many wires to spend time on it.   So, the tiime effective option is a hawkeye with their single hole dedicated forward sensor unit.  Easy to mount the small dial end close to line of sight on the dash.  The transducerthen is further from the EV system and only forward. that leaves the fish finder alone in the stern.  Mount  it where the trailer bunks miss the sensor.  That should do it, not as low cost, but better than hours rebraiding all the stuff that  I still use for real fishing. 

Thanks to all who replied ___  Cal 

--
Joe Novello


Keith Korporaal
 

That’s very cool looking, Joe.  Heck, with scenery like that, no rain, eggs & hot cakes, well, life is good!


From: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io> on behalf of Joe Novello <joenovello3@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 8:54:47 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Depth finder info. needed
 
Here’s mine in action this morning. Don’t let the image fool you - they weren’t liking what I had to offer. Had to eat Hot cakes and eggs for my breakfast. 

On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 6:40 AM Electri-Cal <calboats@...> wrote:
ALL RIGHT Coots, a world of info.  love that  !!    I checked the current installation this morning, and the transducer, --- which is somewhat spotty over trolling speeds now, due to electrical motor static, --- is packaged with too many wires to spend time on it.   So, the tiime effective option is a hawkeye with their single hole dedicated forward sensor unit.  Easy to mount the small dial end close to line of sight on the dash.  The transducerthen is further from the EV system and only forward. that leaves the fish finder alone in the stern.  Mount  it where the trailer bunks miss the sensor.  That should do it, not as low cost, but better than hours rebraiding all the stuff that  I still use for real fishing. 

Thanks to all who replied ___  Cal 

--
Joe Novello


Electri-Cal
 

In reviewing all the great data, I considered that someday I might like to remove the transducer, for a new model, stops working or ??  Cancelled the first order before shipping  so I'm now looking at you'alls posts again. It NEEDS o be a real depth finder to see logs, rocks, or ??   From Johns references, and u tube stuff it looks like I could just put a short pipe with a cap fixed to the hull bulkhead and partially remove the wood hull inside.  Looks like making it taller than the water level would be a good idea, since the bow is very shallow up to a couple feet back.  Will do some hunting on line and at Jerrys store, will update later.  I do have a Cabellas card too, betcha they have done this before, and I get the discount with the advice.

Be dooin' stuff fast, Summers here, and sunken logs are waiting near the shore ----    Cal