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Yaquina


Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.

As I Remember
by Carol Armington


Joe Novello
 

The town of Yaquina is further downriver from the oyster plants.  It is right next to Sawyers marina and the Mad Dog Tavern.  

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 4:52 PM Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.

As I Remember
by Carol Armington

--
Joe Novello


 

As Joe mentioned, Yaquina City was where the Mad Dog Tavern and Sawyer's Landing are today. The Newport city fathers wouldn't pungle up a subsidy for Mr. Hogg to run his railroad into town, so he decided to build his own international seaport city at Yaquina. Passengers and freight came from the valley on the railroad, then crossed the bay on steamers to Newport, Obviously, Mr. Hogg's grand ideas never panned out. It's a very interesting story...

The railroad ran out of Toledo through where the boatyard is and the old bed meets up with the Bay Road after your drive over the hill above the boatyard, the road then follows the railroad bed to Yaquina. When the road was young it crossed the sloughs on the railroad trestles you can still see. They just laid boards on the trestles, with no guardrails or any of that kind of sissy stuff. <g>

If you poke around on the Interweb you'll find a paper written by a college student about Yaquina City. She has some interesting stuff in the paper, but ends it with a photo of that wooden barge moldering away by the Bay Road several miles above Yaquina. The caption reads. "all that's left of Yaquina City"! Nonsense. Yaquina today is actually a pretty hopping place; less of a "ghost town" than Elk City.

On 4/25/2020 4:52 PM, Jim C wrote:
I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.

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John <@Jkohnen>
Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim. (George Santayana)
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Here's the paper on Yaquina City I mentioned. Apologies to the author for calling him a her in my previous post. ;o)

http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/geo422/422_Paper_Sandler.pdf

Somewhere around here I've got a book about the Southern Pacific (and the other railroads it absorbed) in Oregon that has a map of the railroad in Yaquina...

On 4/25/2020 4:52 PM, Jim C wrote:
I just read a book by a lady who grew up in Toledo & she talks about the town of Yaquina being the end of the railroad from the valley. The book was published in 2004 & she claimed the old turntable is gone but there is a house built over the hole the turntable was on & is still there. Any one ever heard of this? My wife thinks the town of Yaquina was where the oyster place is.
As I Remember
by Carol Armington
--
John <@Jkohnen>
The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not. (Mark Twain)
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Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

Thank you, now I know where the town was. Another question  has come up; When they ran the railroad to Newport they used it to haul rock to build the jetty. How did the track get past the waterfront to the jetty?


 

Barges. The quarries were up above Toledo, and some of them were on the opposite side of the river from the railroad, so some rock went all the way downriver by water. Cannon Quarry launch ramp is probably where a dock for a quarry used to be. There was a short railroad up Mill Creek, the creek a bit below Cannon Quarry ramp, to bring rock down to the river from another quarry. I'll bet it was an interesting, jackleg sorta railroad; the sort that'd give an OSHA inspector apoplexy today. <g> But I haven't found any photos of it yet.

Another good book about life up the Yaquina River and Big Elk Creek is:

On the Yaquina and Big Elk, by Evelyn Payne Perry

It's a collection of sketches about life in the early 20th century (and up through filming Sometimes a Great Notion) around Elk City, Salado, Glen, Harlan, Burnt Woods, Eddyville and Chitwood. The author grew up around there, and rode her horse home from college in Corvallis for vacations in the '20s. One thing I noticed from the book was that horses and wagons were used up there long after more civilized places had cars and trucks; because the roads were so bad!

I got On the Yaquina and Big Elk at the museum in Newport. Where did you get As I Remember, by Carol Armington?

On 4/26/2020 7:12 PM, Jim C wrote:
Thank you, now I know where the town was. Another question  has come up; When they ran the railroad to Newport they used it to haul rock to build the jetty. How did the track get past the waterfront to the jetty?
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John <@Jkohnen>
The first human who hurled an insult instead of a stone was the founder of civilization. (Sigmund Freud)
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Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

I got the book at the museum in Toledo. I have to call my brother inlaw in Newport about the barges. He couldn't figure how the train got to the jetty. Thanks
Jim


 

Thanks, Jim. I'll have to pick up a copy next time I'm over there, and the Museum is open. Or maybe we can swap our Yaquina books, if we can ever get together again... <g>

Here are a few photos from On the Yaquina and Big Elk. See attachments. The first is proof that rock did go down the river in barges. <g> "Elk City rock" may mean it came from the old quarry we can see across Big Elk Creek from the park in Elk City.

The second is the Pioneer quarry. Pioneer is up the Yaquina from Elk City, past where river transport is practical, and it's on the same side of the river as the railroad. Or at least the remains of the town are, I suppose the quarry could have been anywhere nearby...

Last is something for the boat nuts. Isn't that a fine looking rowboat!

Alas, the reproduction of the photos in On the Yaquina and Big Elk is terrible. <sigh> But I'll bet they're in the collection in the museum archives.

On 4/27/2020 7:22 PM, Jim C wrote:
I got the book at the museum in Toledo. I have to call my brother inlaw in Newport about the barges. He couldn't figure how the train got to the jetty. Thanks
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John <@Jkohnen>
He was a bold man that first eat an oyster. (Jonathan Swift)
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I was sure I saw a map of the railroad at Yaquina, and I thought it was in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, by Ed Austin & Tom Dill, but I was mistaken, at least about the last part. <sigh> I've attached a map of the yard at Toledo, and a shot of the old depot, just in case you might find it interesting.

Tom at the Yaquina Pacific Railroad Museum can tell you all about Yaquina, and the railroad presence in Toledo, much better than I can:

http://www.yaquinapacificrr.org/

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John <@Jkohnen>
Life can be perfectly satisfying without major achievements. (Alice Munro)



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