Topics

Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations


Electri-Cal
 

First off, I did an 8 ft round bottom dink with old growth cedar cut to just over 5/ 16 ( to allow for some error ) pretty cost effective for a dink.  Used a couple dry 2 X 8 clear cedar boards picked from Jerrys, for grain that laid flat to bend correctly cause I could se it easy.,   NEW saw blade, cur all with a mask to avoid cedar dust, nasty stuff.  I ended up with enough to get me well under way,  Then used a small ball and router table to "C" out one side, sand the other to fit that radius, so the edges overlapped and rotated slightly as laid up over a couple bow, and stern frames L left as was, removed one center frame former.   The bead and cove made alignment almost automatic, and was a pretty stiff hull.

I glassed both sides, but it added unnecessary weight, outside is enough, in my experience,,  Maybe a floorboard inner pad for steeping aboard, or not.  I used elmers waterproof for everything except  glassed areas, I epoxied those.  Again I would use lighter than 3 oz. glass and less of it, the hull was really stronger than needed.  I just yesterday looked on u-Tube, found my favorite product tester, doing wood glues in strength testing.  To cap it offf, he liked PL adhesives, the same brand I prefer, and would use.  The newest PL 8X tested best, in everything.  Liquid nails -- Fuse it  works well as does 3m 5200 ( an old favorite but messy )  Dynagrip is waterproof, but on a dink it's not needed unless abused for a few years, I've done that too !!! 

In fact, I have a folding 11 ft. small boat, that FOLDS to 5 1/2 feet for deck storage, carries my 230 lbs, and has a built in electric motor.  Motor is removable as is the battery, so it might be an idea, as it rows or powers equally well.  Needs a repaint but fairly light, flat bottomed for landing.  Been in the barn for a while, but the marine ply and real epoxy are good, better yet the price is FREE, don't need it any more so some coot could save it from the dumpster, motor goes with it by the way.  Add a paddle or oars and head out, so call and pick it up if you want it, my truck is gone, so don't need the boat around.  Phone is in the cooot members list, or post here.

Latef,  Cal






 


 

To build something like a Katydidn't, at 6 1/2 ft. long, it wouldn't be much trouble to get the strips out of ordinary lumberyard wood, cutting around the flaws. The strips don't need to be perfect anyway. The wood is just a core. You'd put the bad spots between the good parts of the adjacent strips, to keep the shape. It's also kosher to cut out the bad spots and butt shorter strips together when putting them on the boat, but kinda finicky with 1/4" strips, I imagine.

I've got a bead and cove router bit I'd loan to the Boathouse for a strip build.

What was that Elmer's waterproof glue, Cal? I don't much like their "Gorilla Glue" type polyurethane, and I haven't seen an Elmer's "modified" PVA on the shelves. Lots of strip builders just use carpenter's glue, even though it's not water resistant, because it's easy to use. The boats survive fine because they don't live in the water and it takes quite a while for moisture to get through the glass and epoxy. Titebond II and III are as easy to use as carpenter's glue though, so that's what I'd use.

Modern lightweight strip construction is really wood-cored composite construction and doesn't work as intended without glass on both sides of the core. For one thing, glassing just the outside of a light, frameless (the glass acts as the frames) boat isn't a good idea, because if the inside isn't thoroughly sealed the wood can move with changes in it's moisture content, warping the boat out of shape. It's even recommended not to wait very long between glassing the inside and outside because of the risk of the wood moving. It's also the glass on the inside that does almost all the work resisting knocks, bangs, and punctures from outside, since glass is strong in tension, but week in compression. Best to do what the designers say to do...

On 1/8/2020 5:56 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
First off, I did an 8 ft round bottom dink with old growth cedar cut to just over 5/ 16 ( to allow for some error ) pretty cost effective for a dink.  Used a couple dry 2 X 8 clear cedar boards picked from Jerrys, for grain that laid flat to bend correctly cause I could se it easy.,  NEW saw blade, cur all with a mask to avoid cedar dust, nasty stuff. I ended up with enough to get me well under way,  Then used a small ball and router table to "C" out one side, sand the other to fit that radius, so the edges overlapped and rotated slightly as laid up over a couple bow, and stern frames L left as was, removed one center frame former.  The bead and cove made alignment almost automatic, and was a pretty stiff hull.
I glassed both sides, but it added unnecessary weight, outside is enough, in my experience,,  Maybe a floorboard inner pad for steeping aboard, or not.  I used elmers waterproof for everything except  glassed areas, I epoxied those.  Again I would use lighter than 3 oz. glass and less of it, the hull was really stronger than needed.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." (Douglas Adams)


Electri-Cal
 

I have had the "black hand of a Gorilla " too often, gloves or not it's no fun.  The foaming sucks to sand off, mask required !!!   The trick is to have it hold quickly, but have time to tape stripped ( I like the one and a half by say 5/16 inch, makes about 3/16 inch hull ) parts together, from a 2 by 8 straight grain cedar with correct grain for stripping.  We all know how to select boards with correct bending grain so it lays smooth and beads well, that's basic shop talk.

Needs those smooth curves with less lofting effort. Knots and flaws in grain make smooth curves more difficult, and / or break at the chine, or bow rise when bending.   Non perfect grain is way less strength as hard spots, that can pop free when forcing the curves.  I learned that some  $$ wood quality savings make things way tougher to get a smooth sanded flow of hull shape.  Almost have to build one, or a sample  curved panel first, to get the idea.  You can get the strips out in a mornings cutting to do an 8 ft.. dink, only one removable center mould, mine is still in the barn.  Bow and stern pieces are the real ones in most small boats, or a close start.

You tube has ideas and tests, good ones.  I just looked in my shop and the top result is my current stock of 3 tubes (for accurate "beads" ) of  reliable Loktite PL Premium, the 3X stronger type.  It goes on well, wipes ( 2 in. metal spatula ) out of seams to flush off, sands after curing and flexes about like the base strips to hold.  Turns out that's a top  Brand pick from the web site.  I did tests, built boats, decks, bulkheads, and never had a worry on the water.  Rubber gloves and H Freight shop LED light bars are a good idea, and a fan of course.

Did that get it answered??  I have sample panels or cut out pieces around here, or give me a buzzz  !!

Later,  Cal


















On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 1:23 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
To build something like a Katydidn't, at 6 1/2 ft. long, it wouldn't be
much trouble to get the strips out of ordinary lumberyard wood, cutting
around the flaws. The strips don't need to be perfect anyway. The wood
is just a core. You'd put the bad spots between the good parts of the
adjacent strips, to keep the shape. It's also kosher to cut out the bad
spots and butt shorter strips together when putting them on the boat,
but kinda finicky with 1/4" strips, I imagine.

I've got a bead and cove router bit I'd loan to the Boathouse for a
strip build.

What was that Elmer's waterproof glue, Cal? I don't much like their
"Gorilla Glue" type polyurethane, and I haven't seen an Elmer's
"modified" PVA on the shelves. Lots of strip builders just use
carpenter's glue, even though it's not water resistant, because it's
easy to use. The boats survive fine because they don't live in the water
and it takes quite a while for moisture to get through the glass and
epoxy. Titebond II and III are as easy to use as carpenter's glue
though, so that's what I'd use.

Modern lightweight strip construction is really wood-cored composite
construction and doesn't work as intended without glass on both sides of
the core. For one thing, glassing just the outside of a light, frameless
(the glass acts as the frames) boat isn't a good idea, because if the
inside isn't thoroughly sealed the wood can move with changes in it's
moisture content, warping the boat out of shape. It's even recommended
not to wait very long between glassing the inside and outside because of
the risk of the wood moving. It's also the glass on the inside that does
almost all the work resisting knocks, bangs, and punctures from outside,
since glass is strong in tension, but week in compression. Best to do
what the designers say to do...

On 1/8/2020 5:56 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
> First off, I did an 8 ft round bottom dink with old growth cedar cut to
> just over 5/ 16 ( to allow for some error ) pretty cost effective for a
> dink.  Used a couple dry 2 X 8 clear cedar boards picked from Jerrys,
> for grain that laid flat to bend correctly cause I could se it easy., 
>   NEW saw blade, cur all with a mask to avoid cedar dust, nasty stuff. 
> I ended up with enough to get me well under way,  Then used a small ball
> and router table to "C" out one side, sand the other to fit that radius,
> so the edges overlapped and rotated slightly as laid up over a couple
> bow, and stern frames L left as was, removed one center frame former. 
>   The bead and cove made alignment almost automatic, and was a pretty
> stiff hull.
>
> I glassed both sides, but it added unnecessary weight, outside is
> enough, in my experience,,  Maybe a floorboard inner pad for steeping
> aboard, or not.  I used elmers waterproof for everything except  glassed
> areas, I epoxied those.  Again I would use lighter than 3 oz. glass and
> less of it, the hull was really stronger than needed.
 > ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that
thing you just did? Don't do that." (Douglas Adams)






--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal


 

Scraping is the best way to get rid of that nasty polyurthane foam. :ob A good way to handle squeeze-out, drips and sags of any goo. Add heat when scraping epoxy.

Even though Katydidn't is short and fat, the pram bow should make the planks go on easily. No twist to meet a pointy bow. Lofting a boat before making the molds ensures that the planks/strips will lie smoothly with no unexpected sharp bends.

http://www.atkinboatplans.com/Dinks/images/PeteyDinkCm-2.gif

Paul Gartside recommends putting on the first strip so it lies fair, with no edge set. Then working up and down from that, and not being concerned if the strips run out at the sheer, or run into each other at the keel. Of course he likes paint too. <g>

But you're absolutely right that going with cheap materials often leads to more work. Katydidn't is so small that even using the best stuff won't cost too many arms and legs. But cutting strips is awfully wasteful! Every 1/4" strip uses up 3/8" of wood, with a typical tablesaw blade.

PL Premium is like Gorilla Glue with cheap fillers added. It sure works better than the unthickened stuff! And sure is cheaper. But for strip planking I think it's too thick. Something like Titebond II or III is easy to apply and will squeeze out of the joint between strips without heavy clamping. You can wipe of squeezeout with a damp cloth.

On 1/10/2020 5:57 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
I have had the "black hand of a Gorilla " too often, gloves or not it's no fun.  The foaming sucks to sand off, mask required !!! ...
Needs those smooth curves with less lofting effort. Knots and flaws in grain make smooth curves more difficult, and / or break at the chine, or bow rise when bending.   Non perfect grain is way less strength as hard spots, that can pop free when forcing the curves.  I learned that some $$ wood quality savings make things way tougher to get a smooth sanded flow of hull shape.
...
You tube has ideas and tests, good ones.  I just looked in my shop and the top result is my current stock of 3 tubes (for accurate "beads" ) of  reliable Loktite PL Premium, the 3X stronger type.  It goes on well, wipes ( 2 in. metal spatula ) out of seams to flush off, sands after curing and flexes about like the base strips to hold.  Tu
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
If animals could speak, the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow; but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much. (Mark Twain)


Dan
 

After years of using PL Premium, for just about everything. I’ve stated buying an armload of Gorilla Glue Construction Cement this past couple boats.  Kinda like poorman’s Sikaflex.  No substitute for ‘pox, of course.  But, I find I use it for more and more stuff alluhtime.  Lots of edge and face gluing of mdo sheet material for example.  Also, as a bedding compound on deck fittings.  Way less messy than the high dollar clear silicone. 

 

John, today’s quote by Lord Whimsy does put you in hoist-upon- one’s-own-petard territory.  Rhetorically, if not factually…  Dan.


Richard Green
 

"Gorilla Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Ultimate is tough, versatile, and 100% waterproof."

I see this “grabs instantly”, does it give you time to adjust the fit as needed or is it like contact cement which resists movement after positioning?

Rich

On Jan 11, 2020, at 9:04 PM, Dan <danashore@...> wrote:

After years of using PL Premium, for just about everything. I’ve stated buying an armload of Gorilla Glue Construction Cement this past couple boats.  Kinda like poorman’s Sikaflex.  No substitute for ‘pox, of course.  But, I find I use it for more and more stuff alluhtime.  Lots of edge and face gluing of mdo sheet material for example.  Also, as a bedding compound on deck fittings.  Way less messy than the high dollar clear silicone.  
 
John, today’s quote by Lord Whimsy does put you in hoist-upon- one’s-own-petard territory.  Rhetorically, if not factually…  Dan.


 

Which one of these, Dan? How does it compare to PL Premium in price, and why is it better?

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-construction-adhesive-3/

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-heavy-duty-construction-adhesive/

https://www.loctiteproducts.com/en/products/build/construction-adhesives/loctite_pl_premiumpolyurethaneconstructionadhesive.html

The quotes I put at the bottom of my emails are just for entertainment, and to provoke thought. Lord Peter's aphorism seems to have stirred Dan's little gray cells a bit. <g>

On 1/11/2020 9:04 PM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
After years of using PL Premium, for just about everything. I’ve stated buying an armload of Gorilla Glue Construction Cement this past couple boats.  Kinda like poorman’s Sikaflex.  No substitute for ‘pox, of course.  But, I find I use it for more and more stuff alluhtime.  Lots of edge and face gluing of mdo sheet material for example.  Also, as a bedding compound on deck fittings.  Way less messy than the high dollar clear silicone.
John, today’s quote by Lord Whimsy does put you in hoist-upon- one’s-own-petard territory.  Rhetorically, if not factually…  Dan.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I HATE quotation. Tell me what you know. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


 

Earl's three cents worth on Gorilla Construction Adhesive:

"Gorilla Puke

"I tried it ONCE and it made me nauseous and induced a headache. Regardless of it’s strengths, I would avoid it as so many other products are much more enjoyable and safer to use. My 3 cents worth."

Doesn't jibe with their claims of low odor and VOC compliance, but maybe Earl has a particular sensitivity to it...


https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-construction-adhesive-3/

https://www.gorillatough.com/product/gorilla-heavy-duty-construction-adhesive/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
And I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you any different. (Kurt Vonnegut)


Randy Torgerson
 

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.


Randy


Electri-Cal
 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

Lter Coots,   Cal

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 




On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:
RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.


Randy



--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal


Julius Dalzell
 

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!

However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.

Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.

Julius

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

 

Lter Coots,   Cal

 

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.

 

Randy


 

--

Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 


Richard Green
 

When I finished Jaunty I used standard (?) ablative bottom paint to the water line.  Above the water line I used Rodda 100% acrylic house paint over similar primer.  Worked like a champ, easy to do small repairs as scuffs, etc, easy to keep clean.  I put it on with a typical 1/2” house roller and all in all was very happy with it.  Worked like a charm.

Rich

On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:05 AM, Julius Dalzell <jndalzell@...> wrote:

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!
However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.
Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.
Julius
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations
 
You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.
 
Lter Coots,   Cal
 
PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 
 
 
 
 
On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.
 
Randy

 
--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 
<B3DEF9492CEF4CED930991D950FC98C7.png><3799CA652C1744338E9CD1179ED98FF0.png>


Richard Green
 

By the way, I used Kiwigrip for nonskid, loved the simplicity of the application over masked areas, color built in, worked like a charm with very comfortable nonskid.

Rich

On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:05 AM, Julius Dalzell <jndalzell@...> wrote:

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!
However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.
Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.
Julius
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations
 
You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.
 
Lter Coots,   Cal
 
PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 
 
 
 
 
On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.
 
Randy

 
--
Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 
<B3DEF9492CEF4CED930991D950FC98C7.png><3799CA652C1744338E9CD1179ED98FF0.png>


Julius Dalzell
 

OK!

I should never mess around with the web. As the internet continues to decay, no manner of ‘stuff’ may occur.

The previous incomplete e-mail showed two nondescript images.

So hopefully the above three photos complete the picture (npi).

The far right image shows something coming out of the fog. Second image – there it is! Third – sun is out!

This sequence was taken standing at River’s edge over an amazingly short time period.

Not responsible what the viewer may receive.

Julius

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Julius Dalzell
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 10:08 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

Work with Brightside frequently. VOC’s are intolerable for me. Fully masked for the moment the can is opened!

However I have noted that the VOC loadings have substantially lessened over the past year ort so.

Th manufactures are well aware of the negatives and constantly work on chemistries to achieve improvements.

Julius

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Electri-Cal
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 8:03 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Glue, caulk, Strip Planking on small craft, Some Observations

 

You can add me to the list you put up.  No bad acting stuff there, maybe black hands if some PL gets loose, but don't build in good clothes anyhow, that's what the old shop clothes are for.  System 3 is a bit spendy, but there are others that do as well, any good paint dept. can advise on that.  Waterborne epoxy is great stuff, I find that a couple clear coats over lightly sanded main finish makes maintenance a no brainer.  Dock or brush scrapes get a light sand and touch up without having a color coat to touch up, the whole finish stays brighter and UV protected as well.

 

Lter Coots,   Cal

 

PS, --- Second new hip is sweet, spring will be a ton better this year. 

 

 

 

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 9:37 PM Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

RiversWest put on the family boat build at the Portland Wooden Boat Festival every year and we have the families use Loctite PL Premium to glue up the boats.  The design is the Salt Bay Skiff. The stuff is easy to work with, will turn your skin black and dries rock hard. I tell the families that I am coaching to use gloves, clean up the excess and don't get the stuff on your clothes as it won't come out. 

I prefer working with epoxy over polyurethane in all its foams.  What I really want is a waterbased epoxy. Most of the paints that I use now, including marine paint, is water based.  I painted my little Chris Craft pram using Brightsides and I hated working with all the solvents. Fish Taco, my Candle Fish 13, was painted with System Three WR LPU, a water based polyurethane catalyzed paint which I found easy to use.

 

Randy


 

--

Thanks, I will reply to all mail as possible ---  Cal

 

 


 

I've been happy with Rodda "latex" house paint on Lazy Jack, and I had the Retired Old Geezers use it on Whimsy.

On 1/13/2020 10:40 AM, Rich G wrote:
When I finished Jaunty I used standard (?) ablative bottom paint to the water line.  Above the water line I used Rodda 100% acrylic house paint over similar primer.  Worked like a champ, easy to do small repairs as scuffs, etc, easy to keep clean.  I put it on with a typical 1/2” house roller and all in all was very happy with it.  Worked like a charm.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education. (Mark Twain)