Date   
Dick M is Ill

 

Dick's got shingles, and not to put on his roof. <sigh> I hope he recovers quickly with no complications. Shingles are Miserable! I had a dose on my face once and wouldn't wish that on anyone. Got a note from Jan:

"I took Richard (Dick) to Urgent Care today and has been diagnosed with Shingles on his upper right side of his forehead and over his his eye. HIs eye hasn’t been affected as of the UC visit.
Having a horrible headache and pretty uncomfortable. He’s on a Shingles Med to help get rid of the virus.
Dr. said it would last about a week."

--
John (@Jkohnen)
Truth is the most valuable thing we have. Let us economize it. (Mark Twain)

Re: Poured the keel for my Neptune 16

Richard Green
 

Um.  Is the water cold?  Shudder…….

Rich

On May 25, 2019, at 8:23 AM, Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:

<snort> I read a review in . . . Small Craft Advisor, I think - where a guy and his 4 friends TRIED to dump one by sitting on the lee rail in 20kts of wind. They couldn't.  I *think* he said when the keel came up, the boat rounded into the wind. It's been a long time since I've read it.

I'd like to give this a try at Fern Ridge on the 8th. Any takers? I've never dumped a 'real' boat before. Recovered a couple, but never dumped.

On 5/25/2019 7:38 AM, Richard Green wrote:
Based upon a thorough analysis before breakfast this morning, I predict that extra four pounds will enhance the righting moment by 23% and your boat will be ever so much more stable when heeled!  Clever move.

Rich

On May 24, 2019, at 9:19 PM, Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:

We'll be doing a Naming Ceremony at the Triton Boat Gathering on the 8th. Please bring your funny hats.

I was smart enough to do all the work at Tyler's house. HIS back yard is a superfund site. It's always handy to have gullible friends.

After pouring, we couldn't lift it. We had to wedge it around to get it into positions. After planing, grinding, and sanding, it weighed in at 204lbs. Spec is 200, so I call "Close Enough."

On 5/24/2019 12:49 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
It was about time you got the photo essay up! <g>

The keel turned out real good, Andrew. Do you know how much lead was left after all the grinding and sanding? I look forward to seeing the boat under sail soon. I've forgotten her name...

You know your backyard is now a Superfund site. <g>

On 5/20/2019 8:11 PM, Andrew wrote:
This has been in process for a while. Finally got it done.

http://andrewlinn.com/sailboats/neptune/190423_keel/index.htm








Re: Poured the keel for my Neptune 16

Andrew Linn
 

<snort> I read a review in . . . Small Craft Advisor, I think - where a guy and his 4 friends TRIED to dump one by sitting on the lee rail in 20kts of wind. They couldn't.  I *think* he said when the keel came up, the boat rounded into the wind. It's been a long time since I've read it.

I'd like to give this a try at Fern Ridge on the 8th. Any takers? I've never dumped a 'real' boat before. Recovered a couple, but never dumped.

On 5/25/2019 7:38 AM, Richard Green wrote:
Based upon a thorough analysis before breakfast this morning, I predict that extra four pounds will enhance the righting moment by 23% and your boat will be ever so much more stable when heeled! Clever move.

Rich

On May 24, 2019, at 9:19 PM, Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:

We'll be doing a Naming Ceremony at the Triton Boat Gathering on the 8th. Please bring your funny hats.

I was smart enough to do all the work at Tyler's house. HIS back yard is a superfund site. It's always handy to have gullible friends.

After pouring, we couldn't lift it. We had to wedge it around to get it into positions. After planing, grinding, and sanding, it weighed in at 204lbs. Spec is 200, so I call "Close Enough."

On 5/24/2019 12:49 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
It was about time you got the photo essay up! <g>

The keel turned out real good, Andrew. Do you know how much lead was left after all the grinding and sanding? I look forward to seeing the boat under sail soon. I've forgotten her name...

You know your backyard is now a Superfund site. <g>

On 5/20/2019 8:11 PM, Andrew wrote:
This has been in process for a while. Finally got it done.

http://andrewlinn.com/sailboats/neptune/190423_keel/index.htm


Re: Poured the keel for my Neptune 16

Richard Green
 

Based upon a thorough analysis before breakfast this morning, I predict that extra four pounds will enhance the righting moment by 23% and your boat will be ever so much more stable when heeled! Clever move.

Rich

On May 24, 2019, at 9:19 PM, Andrew Linn <alinn@...> wrote:

We'll be doing a Naming Ceremony at the Triton Boat Gathering on the 8th. Please bring your funny hats.

I was smart enough to do all the work at Tyler's house. HIS back yard is a superfund site. It's always handy to have gullible friends.

After pouring, we couldn't lift it. We had to wedge it around to get it into positions. After planing, grinding, and sanding, it weighed in at 204lbs. Spec is 200, so I call "Close Enough."

On 5/24/2019 12:49 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
It was about time you got the photo essay up! <g>

The keel turned out real good, Andrew. Do you know how much lead was left after all the grinding and sanding? I look forward to seeing the boat under sail soon. I've forgotten her name...

You know your backyard is now a Superfund site. <g>

On 5/20/2019 8:11 PM, Andrew wrote:
This has been in process for a while. Finally got it done.

http://andrewlinn.com/sailboats/neptune/190423_keel/index.htm

Re: Poured the keel for my Neptune 16

Andrew Linn
 

We'll be doing a Naming Ceremony at the Triton Boat Gathering on the 8th. Please bring your funny hats.

I was smart enough to do all the work at Tyler's house. HIS back yard is a superfund site. It's always handy to have gullible friends.

After pouring, we couldn't lift it. We had to wedge it around to get it into positions. After planing, grinding, and sanding, it weighed in at 204lbs. Spec is 200, so I call "Close Enough."

On 5/24/2019 12:49 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
It was about time you got the photo essay up! <g>

The keel turned out real good, Andrew. Do you know how much lead was left after all the grinding and sanding? I look forward to seeing the boat under sail soon. I've forgotten her name...

You know your backyard is now a Superfund site. <g>

On 5/20/2019 8:11 PM, Andrew wrote:
This has been in process for a while. Finally got it done.

http://andrewlinn.com/sailboats/neptune/190423_keel/index.htm

Re: Rampaging Death Barges!

Andrew Linn
 

I saw that and said "I could STILL sail a 'Duck out of danger."

On 5/24/2019 12:36 PM, John Kohnen wrote:
Good thing Andrew wasn't there in a Puddle Duck...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKqUvWBzKE8


Just sharing a book of interest

Electri-Cal
 

I was looking to give to coots library some more books I've outgrown.  They will show up as they get read, but read on !!  I also found another book, for bikers, motorcyclists, or just to visit on the way to a boat show.  The Book is "Roofs Over Rivers" , by Bill and Nick Cockrell, -- obviously on covered bridges.  Lined up by county, then an orderly tour to each.  Set a tour 1,  tour 2, etc. for  way easy navigation.  Has mileage, access notes, history, and a lot .of easy to follow routes.  This or a similar guide would make for an interesting drive, to or from a show, maybe more so on a scooter or even pedal bike.  Looks like easy to check out Oregons famous covered bridges.  This is sure not the only book like this, so check your local store for similar ideas.

Saddle up, it's summer allready,.and the cotton is way south of us ----- Cal    

Fern Ridge Spring Messabout

 

I used a bad case of the creeping crud as an excuse to wimp out on the messabout last weekend, but Dan from Almostcanada was there with his camera:

http://www.boat-links.com/Dan/CommenceTheVoyagingSeason.pdf

A small showing of Coots, but the Weatherman had been needlessly threatening. Looks like they had fun, and the thunderstorm didn't hit until Dan and earl were out in the middle of the lake. <g>

--
John (@Jkohnen)
When a man is wrapped up in himself he makes a pretty small package. (John Ruskin)

Re: Poured the keel for my Neptune 16

 

It was about time you got the photo essay up! <g>

The keel turned out real good, Andrew. Do you know how much lead was left after all the grinding and sanding? I look forward to seeing the boat under sail soon. I've forgotten her name...

You know your backyard is now a Superfund site. <g>

On 5/20/2019 8:11 PM, Andrew wrote:
This has been in process for a while. Finally got it done.
http://andrewlinn.com/sailboats/neptune/190423_keel/index.htm
--
John (@Jkohnen)
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")

Re: just saying hello from downunder

 

Welcome aboard, David! Trinidad? That's barely downunder at all. <g> Did you go to the Big Lagoon messabout weekend before last?

http://www.luckhardt.com/blmessabout.html

If not, you should try to do it next year. They're a pretty wild crowd, but mostly harmless. <g>

What boats have you built?

On 5/18/2019 11:57 AM, David W wrote:
hi John, I live in Trinidad CA, just down the road from the Oregon coast, have built several small boats and just looking to connect with others that enjoy building small wooden boats, by the way I am really very amateurish with my skill level as a builder and do not really know how to sail very well
--
John (@Jkohnen)
After all, all he did was string together a lot of old, well-known quotations. (H. L. Mencken on Shakespeare)

Re: Stuck Bolts

 

Good luck, Elaine!

On 5/23/2019 8:28 PM, elaine wrote:
Thank you very much everyone for the terrific advice. I'm going to do the heat and a punch this weekend. I'll keep you all posted.
--
John (@Jkohnen)
After all, all he did was string together a lot of old, well-known quotations. (H. L. Mencken on Shakespeare)

Rampaging Death Barges!

 

Good thing Andrew wasn't there in a Puddle Duck...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKqUvWBzKE8



--
John (@Jkohnen)
Every generation revolts against its fathers and makes friends with its grandfathers. (Lewis Mumford)

Re: Took a motorcycle ride.

Electri-Cal
 

I think that was well spoken John !!  
It is nasty stuff, we have used several seriously harmful air crud for way too long.  Military vehicles and planes world wide are killing the pure air we need.  Propane, paint and thinners, coal  related, natural gas waste, rubber ---  it goes on from there.  Too many people for common sense.

Whoops, Me too !!  ----  Byee John



On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 8:06 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Please forgive my rant. I guess I was in a sour mood...

On 5/21/2019 11:19 PM, I wrote:
> ...
> There were very good reasons to get the lead out of gasoline, and we all
> ought to be glad they did. Gasohol is another matter. Nasty stuff... <sigh>
> ...

--
John (jkohnen@...)
I care not for a man's religion whose dog or cat are not the better for
it. (Abraham Lincoln)




Re: Stuck Bolts and a bit more on patch tech.

Electri-Cal
 

With heat and punch, plus age, the surrounding wood is most likely also damaged,   When redoing the bad wood be brutal and get it all gone first.  I would make a square hole, not round, and fit a well epoxied square plug of good marine ply, so it can't turn. a couple screws crosswise and flush, through the joint seam so it can't twist, finally an outer glass sheath.  I have some spare  (better) carbon fiber cloth that you may have, and I can cut it to fit on each side on the plywood rudder, that cures it forever. Don't use scissors, takes shears --- its double tough. Handle carefully, it is carbon hair, lay it on whole ,over unset resin mix, and recoat after first has firmed up.  Rubber gloves good idea. dill hole after full set up.  Self lubes the rudder swivel area !!   Carbon is great stuff, the bow, and forefoot of my boat has several layers edgewise, and a foot back underneath it -- no dock or beach too tough.

I can cut some rudder patches for you this week end, and also send the basic parts for those elusive straps with it. I can't locate even one around here, darn !!!!   Solves two problems at once, as I can send enough of both projects at one time.  Will be in the mail Tuesday, got it in my book  Will get your address from the list, or John.

Have a great 3 day weekend, best wishes ----  Cal

Re: Stuck Bolts

elaineginader
 

Thank you very much everyone for the terrific advice. I'm going to do the heat and a punch this weekend. I'll keep you all posted.


On Thu, May 23, 2019, 8:21 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Stainless steel is nasty stuff to drill.

If you can find a hole saw a little bigger than the bolts' diameter,
that you can remove the pilot drill from (too many ifs? <g>) you can cut
a core out of the wooden rudder containing the bolt. Then fill the hole
with thickened epoxy and redrill for the new bolts.

If I had Elaine's problem and heat and pounding didn't release the
bolts, what I'd do is see if I can find a piece of steel, or even
copper,  tubing in my junk that has an internal diameter a little bigger
than the bolts. Then I'd file some teeth in one end, chuck the other in
a drill motor and go to town! <g> I still use some "temporary" tools
like that, made years ago for one little job and not expected to last
any longer than that...

But first I'd use a car battery to heat up each bolt, then immediately
bang on it with a Big hammer and a punch.

On 5/23/2019 6:20 PM, AussieDave wrote:
> You could try drill the buggers out with carbide bit/burrs?


--
John (jkohnen@...)
America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose
our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. (Abraham Lincoln)




Re: Stuck Bolts

 

Stainless steel is nasty stuff to drill.

If you can find a hole saw a little bigger than the bolts' diameter, that you can remove the pilot drill from (too many ifs? <g>) you can cut a core out of the wooden rudder containing the bolt. Then fill the hole with thickened epoxy and redrill for the new bolts.

If I had Elaine's problem and heat and pounding didn't release the bolts, what I'd do is see if I can find a piece of steel, or even copper, tubing in my junk that has an internal diameter a little bigger than the bolts. Then I'd file some teeth in one end, chuck the other in a drill motor and go to town! <g> I still use some "temporary" tools like that, made years ago for one little job and not expected to last any longer than that...

But first I'd use a car battery to heat up each bolt, then immediately bang on it with a Big hammer and a punch.

On 5/23/2019 6:20 PM, AussieDave wrote:
You could try drill the buggers out with carbide bit/burrs?
--
John (@Jkohnen)
America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. (Abraham Lincoln)

Re: Took a motorcycle ride.

 

Please forgive my rant. I guess I was in a sour mood...

On 5/21/2019 11:19 PM, I wrote:
...
There were very good reasons to get the lead out of gasoline, and we all ought to be glad they did. Gasohol is another matter. Nasty stuff... <sigh>
...
--
John (@Jkohnen)
I care not for a man's religion whose dog or cat are not the better for it. (Abraham Lincoln)

Re: Stuck Bolts

AussieDave
 

You could try drill the buggers out with carbide bit/burrs?

Re: Took a motorcycle ride.

Electri-Cal
 

Thanks John for the way more detailed info., on gasahol.   The additive packages in todays fuel could be suspect also, as in -- if the gas producers know about this why isn't the water remover, that anybody can buy at Bi Mart, simply put in the gas before the pump ??  Cost is minimal at that dealer level.   My Creswell mech shop said to not patronize one gas station in particular, because Arco gas caused problems in many cars he serviced.  Rusty fuel systems, and more crudded up small fuel system parts were what I remember.  I add a good fuel additive to prevent that, on vehicles I don't drive as often, like the Majesty.  If I had gas boats, that would be a concern, glad that is done with.

Cal


On Tue, May 21, 2019 at 11:20 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Engines built to use leaded gasoline have valves and valve seats that
don't hold up well without the lead. The US began phasing out leaded gas
in 1973 (just looked it up), and it was completely gone by the early
'90s. Any engine built from the mid-70s on ought to be fine with
unleaded gas. IIRC, my '75 Norton engine came with hardened valve seats
(and my '70 Norton engine has them now). Older engines that aren't run
hard often run forever on unleaded even though they aren't supposed to.
They're usually owned by enthusiasts anyway nowadays, who don't mind
doing a valve job now and then, or replacing the valve seats... Of
course two-stroke engines never cared about lead one way or another,
except for its octane-boosting property.

There were very good reasons to get the lead out of gasoline, and we all
ought to be glad they did. Gasohol is another matter. Nasty stuff... <sigh>

Nobody ever thought anyone would be crazy enough to put alcohol in
gasoline, so the fuel system manufacturers were careful to make their
components resistant to gasoline, but they didn't even think about
alcohol resistance. So fuel system parts made before gasohol was foisted
on us by the corn lobby _may_ be damaged by alcohol. Charley is going
through this right now with an old Johhnyrude (Evinson?). It's got a
cork carburettor float that was sealed with shellac. Worked fine for 50
years -- shellac laughs at gasoline. :o) But alcohol is the solvent for
shellac! :o( Most of the rubber and plastic fuel system parts made prior
to the gasohol age will _probably_ hold up fine... You find out when
they don't. <sigh>

For us boaters the worst thing about gasohol, and the issue that has
caused the most damage to all kinds of engines, is it's ability to
absorb water -- until it doesn't. Alcohol can absorb a _lot_ of water,
even from the air, (remember buying "gas line dryer"? yep, alcohol) but
when it reaches its saturation point it just dumps the water wherever it
is -- in your gas tank or carburettor. In the tank the water builds up
in the bottom until your engine sucks water instead of gas. In the carb
the water sits there corroding everything it touches. :o(

The mileage of my Prius went down almost 10% when we were forced to
switch to gasohol. :o( And it cost more than pure gas! <harrumph> naty
stuff...

Don't get me started about plans to put even more alcohol into our gas!!

On 5/21/2019 6:21 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
> ...
> The old carb gaskets, and fuel lines are not
> designed for lead free, neither are the valves set up for non lead.
 > ...

--
John (jkohnen@...)
If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not
have given them to such a scoundrel. (Jonathan Swift)




Re: Took a motorcycle ride.

 

Engines built to use leaded gasoline have valves and valve seats that don't hold up well without the lead. The US began phasing out leaded gas in 1973 (just looked it up), and it was completely gone by the early '90s. Any engine built from the mid-70s on ought to be fine with unleaded gas. IIRC, my '75 Norton engine came with hardened valve seats (and my '70 Norton engine has them now). Older engines that aren't run hard often run forever on unleaded even though they aren't supposed to. They're usually owned by enthusiasts anyway nowadays, who don't mind doing a valve job now and then, or replacing the valve seats... Of course two-stroke engines never cared about lead one way or another, except for its octane-boosting property.

There were very good reasons to get the lead out of gasoline, and we all ought to be glad they did. Gasohol is another matter. Nasty stuff... <sigh>

Nobody ever thought anyone would be crazy enough to put alcohol in gasoline, so the fuel system manufacturers were careful to make their components resistant to gasoline, but they didn't even think about alcohol resistance. So fuel system parts made before gasohol was foisted on us by the corn lobby _may_ be damaged by alcohol. Charley is going through this right now with an old Johhnyrude (Evinson?). It's got a cork carburettor float that was sealed with shellac. Worked fine for 50 years -- shellac laughs at gasoline. :o) But alcohol is the solvent for shellac! :o( Most of the rubber and plastic fuel system parts made prior to the gasohol age will _probably_ hold up fine... You find out when they don't. <sigh>

For us boaters the worst thing about gasohol, and the issue that has caused the most damage to all kinds of engines, is it's ability to absorb water -- until it doesn't. Alcohol can absorb a _lot_ of water, even from the air, (remember buying "gas line dryer"? yep, alcohol) but when it reaches its saturation point it just dumps the water wherever it is -- in your gas tank or carburettor. In the tank the water builds up in the bottom until your engine sucks water instead of gas. In the carb the water sits there corroding everything it touches. :o(

The mileage of my Prius went down almost 10% when we were forced to switch to gasohol. :o( And it cost more than pure gas! <harrumph> naty stuff...

Don't get me started about plans to put even more alcohol into our gas!!

On 5/21/2019 6:21 AM, Electri-Cal wrote:
...
The old carb gaskets, and fuel lines are not designed for lead free, neither are the valves set up for non lead.
...
--
John (@Jkohnen)
If Heaven had looked upon riches to be a valuable thing, it would not have given them to such a scoundrel. (Jonathan Swift)