Date   

Re: Depth finder info. needed

 

1) One often has to send a transom mount transducer to the manufacturer to exchange it for a through-hull one.

2) A through-hull transducer can interfere with getting a boat on or off its trailer.

3) Some people don't like drilling a hole in their boat. <g>

On 5/15/2020 10:06 PM, Case wrote:
Drill a hole in the bottom. Use a they hull transducer some sikaflex or boat life adhesive and be done with it. No weird boxes, oil, water, witches concoctions to deal with. No interference, no fuss.
--
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Re: Depth finder info. needed

 

Good old PVC pipe. What would we do without it? <g>

On 5/15/2020 3:41 PM, Joe Novello wrote:
Here is my portable fish/depth finder for my Elegant Punt and Good Girl.
The fish think I’m cheating.
I bedded the transducer on my Catalina 25 in a big blob of silicone inside a piece of PVC inside the boat. So far it has been good down to 200 feet.
...
--
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We should not be simply fighting evil in the name of good, but struggling against the certainties of people who claim always to know where good and evil are to be found. (Tzvetan Todorov)
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Algae Bloom at Fern Ridge

 

"Fern Ridge Lake has the most spectacular algae bloom I’ve ever seen. Pretty much wall to wall. Like a scene from a horror movie. I sometimes regret moving from a Day Sailer to a keelboat, but not today. I want to be as far from the water as possible." (Talbot B)

https://preview.tinyurl.com/ycm5wx8h

or

https://groups.io/g/Fernsail/topic/it_s_not_easy_being_green/74243836?p=,,,20,0,0,0::recentpostdate%2Fsticky,,,20,2,0,74243836

Gonna go look for myself...

--
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The sea washes off all the woes of men. (Joshua Slocum)


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Re: Depth finder info. needed

Case Turner
 

Drill a hole in the bottom. Use a they hull transducer some sikaflex or boat life adhesive and be done with it. No weird boxes, oil, water, witches concoctions to deal with. No interference, no fuss.

Case

Sent from not here

On May 15, 2020, at 9:39 PM, Gerard Mittelstaedt <MITTEL48@...> wrote:


My sister had a large ferro cement hulled staysail schooner (well, large to my eyes)
It had a sonar which was mounted in a tube.  The sonar head could be lowered down
through the tube to look forward and positioned at various angles.
Much of the time it was raised above the bottom of the tube - which was flush to the
bottom of the boat.  This was good as one time the boat hit one of those huge logs which
float under the water and we could hear it rolling as the long keel proceeded over it
(no damage to the ferro cement keel) and since the sonar head was retracted
into the tube (not protruding down) it was not damaged. 
  One good use was coming in to a harbor/bay down an unmarked channel. 
The sonar showed the deep water and we had an easy go of it.
  Also, particularly when anchored down it was interesting seeing some rather
large fish below... and being impatient when none seemed to care at all for our bait.

This was in the San Juan Islands and also into Nanaimo and on to Princess Louisa
inlet.

Gerard Mittelstaedt
sadly now in south Texas
not in the glorious NW


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 5:41 PM Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:
<IMG_2013.jpg>


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


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--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


Re: Depth finder info. needed

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

My sister had a large ferro cement hulled staysail schooner (well, large to my eyes)
It had a sonar which was mounted in a tube.  The sonar head could be lowered down
through the tube to look forward and positioned at various angles.
Much of the time it was raised above the bottom of the tube - which was flush to the
bottom of the boat.  This was good as one time the boat hit one of those huge logs which
float under the water and we could hear it rolling as the long keel proceeded over it
(no damage to the ferro cement keel) and since the sonar head was retracted
into the tube (not protruding down) it was not damaged. 
  One good use was coming in to a harbor/bay down an unmarked channel. 
The sonar showed the deep water and we had an easy go of it.
  Also, particularly when anchored down it was interesting seeing some rather
large fish below... and being impatient when none seemed to care at all for our bait.

This was in the San Juan Islands and also into Nanaimo and on to Princess Louisa
inlet.

Gerard Mittelstaedt
sadly now in south Texas
not in the glorious NW


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 5:41 PM Joe Novello <joenovello3@...> wrote:


On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


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--
Joe Novello



--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


Re: Depth finder info. needed

Joe Novello
 



On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


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Re: Depth finder info. needed

Joe Novello
 

Here is my portable fish/depth finder for my Elegant Punt and Good Girl. 

The fish think I’m cheating. 

I bedded the transducer on my Catalina 25 in a big blob of silicone inside a piece of PVC inside the boat. So far it has been good down to 200 feet. 

Joe



On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 3:03 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the
transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop
working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the
least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a
good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or
aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin
plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a
depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
> Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with
> water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with
> substantial hull thickness.
>
> I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except
> with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality
> 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run
> in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want
> 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power
> output and frequency.
>
> A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw
> cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full
> and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
>
> John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength
> laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just
> be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

--
John <jkohnen@...>
The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for.
(Laurence J. Peter)


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Joe Novello


Re: Depth finder info. needed

 

I'd been told that you should never run a depthfinder with the transducer out of the water, because they don't like that and might stop working in protest, but the guy in the Hawkeye video doesn't seem the least bit concerned. <shrug> The baggy full of water trick looks like a good way to test different locations in the boat, if it's fiberglass or aluminum, or even to see if the transducer will work through a thin plywood bottom.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

With the low water in the local Mudhole this year maybe I should add a depthfinder to Tuffy's equipment before putting her in the water. <g>

On 5/15/2020 7:31 AM, john a wrote:
Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with substantial hull thickness.
I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power output and frequency.
A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about.
John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just be sure to fully saturate the cloth.
--
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The man who is always waving the flag usually waives what it stands for. (Laurence J. Peter)
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If Phil Bolger Had Designed an Airplane

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blohm_%26_Voss_BV_141

Symmetry is overrated... <g>

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Experience teaches you that the man who looks you straight in the eye, particularly if he adds a firm handshake, is hiding something. (Clifton Fadiman)


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Re: Depth finder info. needed

johnacord
 

Just a couple of notes to add to John's comments.  My experience with water boxes is with fiberglass hulls, including bigger boats with substantial hull thickness.

I have never had a problem with a water box mounted transducer except with one of those cheap sounders with the small round dial.  A quality 'fish finder' type works fine and is good for the depths we normally run in around here.  Depth range should not be an issue, but if you want 60-100 fathom range you need to pay attention to the transducer power output and frequency.

A good water box can be made from a plastic pipe fitting with a screw cap.  What ever you use be sure to have a way to get the water box full and vent out all the air so it can't get bubbles when the boat moves about. 

John's method sounds fine and if you are concerned about strength laminate in some layers of fiberglass cloth in your 'epoxy plug'.  Just be sure to fully saturate the cloth.

John A.


Re: Depth finder info. needed

 

Cut through the plywood bottom from the top, until you reach the fiberglass sheathing, making a hole larger than the size of the transducer. Then fill the hole with epoxy. The transducer will shoot right through solid epoxy and glass. Then mount a bottomless jar, or homemade reservoir of some sort, on top of the epoxy, put the transducer in it and fill it with mineral oil. Seal up the top of the jar around the cable to the transducer, and Robert's your mother's brother. :o)

If you think you might not need to easily replace the transducer someday, instead of a jar, make a stiff epoxy putty and put a healthy glob on top of the filled hole, then squoosh the transducer down into it, being careful to be sure there are no gaps or bubbles between the transducer and putty.

https://youtu.be/22SzRXa21hg

I've read of people mounting transducers inside _thin_ plywood bottoms without using the epoxy filled hole trick, and they worked, though with a loss of range. But who of us worries about whether our depthfinder only works to 175 ft. instead of 200 ft.? <g> You can do some experiments before cutting anything.

On 5/14/2020 6:27 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
PS -- How about a small "Bolger Bulge" under the bow, in wood and glass, with a flush mount transducer in just the trailing edge a bit ??  Just now occurred to me, but would prefer a non bulge solution.  I can't be the only one who wants an early warning for exposed lower units.  Thanks,  Cal
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Re: Depth finder info. needed

Electri-Cal
 

PS -- How about a small "Bolger Bulge" under the bow, in wood and glass, with a flush mount transducer in just the trailing edge a bit ??  Just now occurred to me, but would prefer a non bulge solution.  I can't be the only one who wants an early warning for exposed lower units.   Thanks,  Cal 


Depth finder info. needed

Electri-Cal
 

In trying to protect my twin props solidly mounted, I "cooked" up an idea or two.  I redid the bracket on the stern to swivel forward far enough to catch underwater stuff, IF -- I can interpret the screen angles !!   First, has anybody else tried this forward facing pickup, I haven't been in the water yet so I don't have a clue.  I really need a way to put a Humminbird sensor in the forward inside of the hull, behind the area that hits the beach first, gotta be inside or flush to the flat bottomed hull.

Next is the "rumor" that a clear bottomed plastic jar with mineral oil will show through a plastic hull ??  Not sure about that either.  I was told that wood stops reading anything, plywood has glue lines , etc.  However I could, "SHUDDER" drill a 3 inch hole and insert a fitted bottle with mineral oil much further forward to look down much more as intended.  Sure would like some input on possible ways to see the drt -- before the props encounter it about 16 feet  later.  John Kohnen and I stirred some red mud at Triangle lake last time, an early warning would help a lot.  Even at 5 mph stuff seems to rush right up to those props.

Help, any experienced info, really needed before I Try something stupid,  thanks,   Cal 


Re: Big Catboat 4 Sale in Astoria

Richard Green
 

All depends on the build quality. A proper build job is way less maintenance than a poor job. You’re sure right about mooring year ‘round and the need to drive affecting usage and maintenance.

Rich

On May 14, 2020, at 12:14 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

A bargain for someone who knows what they're getting into: A big wooden boat that needs to be kept in the water, so it costs money all year long, even when you're not using it, and if the place you've got it docked isn't nearby you won't use it much. It's out in the weather all the time, so there's plenty of maintenance. Then there's catching up on the damage caused by the neglect of previous owners who tired of keeping a big wooden boat...

I'm really glad I didn't have a place to moor that catboat. ;o) I'll stick to trying to keep my boat dreams to what I can tow with my four-cylinder pickup. <g>

That looks like a nice catboat. I sure hope it found a good home with someone who'll treat it right.

On 5/13/2020 7:46 PM, Rich G wrote:
A bargain for sure!!

That Brewer cat ended up selling for $2,600! If only I'd had a place to keep it. <sigh> I hope it went to a good home.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2005-Ted-Brewer-Cat-Boat-22ft-Sailboat-Yanmar-Diesel-TRULY-BEAUTIFUL-Astoria-OR/313074907448?hash=item48e4b7f938:g:VhkAAOSwZE9es2sC
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Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. (W. C. Fields)


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Re: Big Catboat 4 Sale in Astoria

 

A bargain for someone who knows what they're getting into: A big wooden boat that needs to be kept in the water, so it costs money all year long, even when you're not using it, and if the place you've got it docked isn't nearby you won't use it much. It's out in the weather all the time, so there's plenty of maintenance. Then there's catching up on the damage caused by the neglect of previous owners who tired of keeping a big wooden boat...

I'm really glad I didn't have a place to moor that catboat. ;o) I'll stick to trying to keep my boat dreams to what I can tow with my four-cylinder pickup. <g>

That looks like a nice catboat. I sure hope it found a good home with someone who'll treat it right.

On 5/13/2020 7:46 PM, Rich G wrote:
A bargain for sure!!

That Brewer cat ended up selling for $2,600! If only I'd had a place to keep it. <sigh> I hope it went to a good home.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2005-Ted-Brewer-Cat-Boat-22ft-Sailboat-Yanmar-Diesel-TRULY-BEAUTIFUL-Astoria-OR/313074907448?hash=item48e4b7f938:g:VhkAAOSwZE9es2sC
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Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. (W. C. Fields)
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Re: Big Catboat 4 Sale in Astoria

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

someone got a good deal.
- GM.


On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 9:46 PM Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:
A bargain for sure!!

Rich

> On May 13, 2020, at 7:46 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
>
> That Brewer cat ended up selling for $2,600! If only I'd had a place to keep it. <sigh> I hope it went to a good home.
>
> On 5/9/2020 4:00 PM, I wrote:
>> Scott Coleman called me with a tip on an interesting sailboat: a 2005 homebuilt 22' Ted Brewer catboat for sale on eBay by a charity. Latest bid $1,150.
>> ... https://preview.tinyurl.com/y8tg7nlo
>> or
>> https://www.ebay.com/itm/2005-Ted-Brewer-Cat-Boat-22ft-Sailboat-Yanmar-Diesel-TRULY-BEAUTIFUL-Astoria-OR/313074907448?hash=item48e4b7f938:g:VhkAAOSwZE9es2sC
>
> --
> John <jkohnen@...>
> The security of the Kingdom is increased by every man being more or less a sailor. (Capt. Marryat)
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>






--
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McAllen, Texas
USA


Re: Big Catboat 4 Sale in Astoria

Richard Green
 

A bargain for sure!!

Rich

On May 13, 2020, at 7:46 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

That Brewer cat ended up selling for $2,600! If only I'd had a place to keep it. <sigh> I hope it went to a good home.

On 5/9/2020 4:00 PM, I wrote:
Scott Coleman called me with a tip on an interesting sailboat: a 2005 homebuilt 22' Ted Brewer catboat for sale on eBay by a charity. Latest bid $1,150.
... https://preview.tinyurl.com/y8tg7nlo
or
https://www.ebay.com/itm/2005-Ted-Brewer-Cat-Boat-22ft-Sailboat-Yanmar-Diesel-TRULY-BEAUTIFUL-Astoria-OR/313074907448?hash=item48e4b7f938:g:VhkAAOSwZE9es2sC
--
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The security of the Kingdom is increased by every man being more or less a sailor. (Capt. Marryat)


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Re: Big Catboat 4 Sale in Astoria

 

That Brewer cat ended up selling for $2,600! If only I'd had a place to keep it. <sigh> I hope it went to a good home.

On 5/9/2020 4:00 PM, I wrote:
Scott Coleman called me with a tip on an interesting sailboat: a 2005 homebuilt 22' Ted Brewer catboat for sale on eBay by a charity. Latest bid $1,150.
... https://preview.tinyurl.com/y8tg7nlo
or
https://www.ebay.com/itm/2005-Ted-Brewer-Cat-Boat-22ft-Sailboat-Yanmar-Diesel-TRULY-BEAUTIFUL-Astoria-OR/313074907448?hash=item48e4b7f938:g:VhkAAOSwZE9es2sC
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The security of the Kingdom is increased by every man being more or less a sailor. (Capt. Marryat)
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Re: Mark Neuhaus is famous!

 

Are you saying that Mark has a closetful of the original Atlas of Oregon Lakes? <g> I the decades since mark worked on the original they've moved into the 21st century and gone online. But it looks like they've "deproved" the interfacxe since the last time I was there <sigh>:

https://oregonlakesatlas.org/

https://oregonlakesatlas.org/map?lake=17070301000863

On 5/12/2020 9:23 AM, David G wrote:
I'd have said 'infamous'... but you could be right.
Not only that... ask him about about his published cartogrophy regarding Oregon Lakes. Might even still have some for sale!!
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Re: Mark Neuhaus is famous!

Case Turner
 

I went to Paulina lakes wiki and it referenced the same atlas but did not not reference Mark. 

Sent from not here

On May 12, 2020, at 9:23 AM, David Graybeal via groups.io <harbordavid@...> wrote:



I'd have said 'infamous'... but you could be right.

 

Not only that... ask him about about his published cartogrophy regarding Oregon Lakes. Might even still have some for sale!!


--
Dirt