Date   

Re: Learn something new, every day.

 

What brand and model of planer, Andy? Congratulations! A thickness planer is an awful handy tool to have around.

My little Delta 12" planer gets clogged up if I don't have it hooked up to my dust collector. It cuts smoother and happier when the shavings get sucked away. It's probably not unique among small planers in that respect.

My Delta has little replaceable, and reversible, blades, but it if you were lucky enough to get a good older planer, or a heavier duty one, it may have blades that can be sharpened. There should be at least one sharpening shop in Capitolopolis.

While you're at the saw shop, they can probably sell you a nice ripping blade for your table saw. ;o)

Maybe pick one up for your skilsaw too. To rip big pieces of pallet into smaller strips that can be more safely, and easily, handled on the table saw.

Have fun, but be careful.

On 11/27/2020 8:01 PM, Andrew wrote:
...
I work for a building supply store, and we get 12' long pallets.
...
All was good, except these  boards were a hair over 3/4" thick. I was wondering how to get them down to about 3/8".  I could have done the smart thing and ripped them on edge on my table saw. It's mostly safe. Mostly.
However, I have just purchased a used planer/thicknesser. What better way to make skinny boards out of thick boards?
1 1/2 GARBAGE BAGS of shavings later, I have my sticks.
Good news is my planer works. I should probably get new blades.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone. (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Any Authors Out There?

Roger Padvorac
 

John,
For the most part, writers and editors have different personalities, and you have a writer personality.
 
You have interesting knowledge about a wide variety of boating subjects, and have opinions about many aspects of life.
 
What you need is an editor to turn some of your verbal meanderings into essays.
 
For instance, you know more about sailing in wind tunnels than most people do, especially since most people haven't heard of this. By this I mean sailing on the Columbia or Strait of Juan de Fuca. There are other wind-tunnel rivers like this and it would be good for people to know about this before they go sailing in them.
 
Yes, people usually say you go sailing on a river. However, if its a wind tunnel, you are sailing in the tunnel, and if you are inexperienced, you have a good chance of sailing in the river.
 
People who are interested in everything about sailing would find an essay about this to be interesting, even if they won't ever go sailing in a location like this.
 
* * * *
I'm at the opposite end of the human spectrum from editors.
 
While I'm good at technical writing, I find arm-waving, populist, political writing to be a lot more fun.
 
I'm the kind of person who survived their last year in the marines by going to a lot of Grateful Dead concerts, including an amazing all-weekend concert on the shore of the Pacific Ocean. If I'd reenlisted, they would have sent me to officers candidate school so there was less people I could be insubordinate to.
 
I'm discovering its impossible for me to write a fair description of the kind of personality, who highly values the correct use of grammar. I haven't gotten along well with editors in the past. Maybe I haven't had the chance to work with a truly talented editor.
 
All I can say is that we would have very little worth reading, without editors, and so they provide an essential role in society. Yes, this is damning with faint praise, but its the best I can do. Meticulous attention to grammar is incompatible with a deadhead marine, who thinks being a demagogue would be fun :)
 
* * * *
Lots of people write very badly, and a good editor is how they end up being published. There is a short list of fiction writers that I reread, and several of them praise the support they received from their editor, so I know good editors are out there, somewhere.
 
What you need is to find a person, not like me, to turn you into a published writer.
 
Sincerely,
Roger
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Kohnen" <jkohnen@...>
To: "Oregon Coots" <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 3:26 PM
Subject: [oregoncoots] Any Authors Out There?

> The TSCA magazine is in need of articles. Don't be shy, they've even
> printed stuff Andrew wrote. ;o)
>
> Alas, I have enough trouble just answering my email... <sigh>
>
> "Andy Wolfe is still/always/again looking for material for the Ash
> Breeze.  This month he's falling a bit short again.  If you have any
> stories or pix of chapter activities or individual members' activities,
> please send them to Andy at
andy@....  Pass this to all
> your members as well.
>
> "Don't forget that the Ash Breeze is largely what YOU as TSCA chapters
> and members make of it.  Send Andy material ANY TIME, and it will likely
> get in the next issue.  Don't worry too much about deadlines; there will
> always (we hope) be an upcoming issue!
>
> "John Weiss
> TSCA Chapter Coordinator"
>
> --
> John <
jkohnen@...>
> It's remarkable how quickly a good and favorable wind can sweep away the
> maddening frustrations of shore living. (Ernest K. Gann)
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
>
https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>


Re: Cheap fiberglass

 

Chief Redelk over on the Duckworks group has used Titebond II for a lot of "off the label" uses. He's used it with various fabrics, and also, thinned, as a primer on bare wood under latex paint. Apparently the key, as it were, for using it as a primer is to wait until the goo is _almost_ set, then slapping on the paint. His boats have lasted well in northern Louisiana, but he stores them under cover, and they only get wet when he uses them.

That's not a typo -- Titebond II. It's cheaper and easier to find in Louisiana than Titebond III. Some other folks over on the DW group have also experimented with using Titebonds in unusual ways. I'd only use it as anything other than glue on a boat I wasn't putting much money and effort into:

https://groups.io/g/dwforum/

On 11/27/2020 11:31 AM, Jim C wrote:
I was looking at home made campers on YouTube & there was someone coating his plywood with watered down titebond 3 then covering it with a bed sheet then more watered down titebond. He then painted it. The finish was rough. I can visualize all of it peeling off in a couple of years. I know titebond is a great glue, but this good? Anyone ever done this?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Men with the muckrake are often indispensable to the well-being of society. (Theodore Roosevelt)
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Re: Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

Pete Leenhouts
 

Yes, he's the one...who commented on how so many of the NF writers had ag names...just read that passage in his wonderful book yesterday as your earlier comment has prompted me to reread the book. His chapter on John Atkin was really fantastic, as was the chapter on using lemon oil extract to sharpen tools...(laughing). 

I will look back at the turn of the century Rudder magazines to see if I can find anything on naptha engines. 

(time passes) 

OK, using Control F search function against this website, you'll find a number of articles about naptha launches. The Rudder - Index (navalmarinearchive.com)

I might have paper copies of a few of these should you be interested (I cold photograph them for you).    

WR/Pete  



-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Nov 27, 2020 10:10 am
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

Thanks, Pete. Uncle Westy's book is indeed marvelous, and I should dig
my copy out even if it doesn't have a chapter on naphtha launches. :o)
Not as much fun as reading Weston Farmer (I believe he's the fellow who
commented about how so many of the small boat writers in National
Fisherman had "agricultural" names -- Gardner, Culler, Farmer... <g>):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha_launch

https://www.gasenginemagazine.com/engines-a-z/the-naphtha-engine

http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/POWER/petrol/petrol.htm

I hope everyone had a Good Thanksgiving. Mary and I are doing our dinner
today.

On 11/27/2020 9:52 AM, Pete L wrote:
> Weston Farmer mentions naptha engines in his marvelous book "From My Old
> Boatshop", but infrequently. He seemed to be much more interested in gas
> engines in that book. I've read quite a few Rudder magazines from the
> very early 1900's; its interesting, thinking about it, that explosions
> of any kind - naptha or gasolene - are not mentioned as far as I can
> recall. Pete
>
> ...
> I think Westy Farmer
> wrote an article about naphtha launches. I'll have to dig up my copy of
>  From My Old Boatshop and look...
> ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
Any fool can carry on, but a wise man knows how to shorten sail in time.
(Joseph Conrad)


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Learn something new, every day.

Andrew Linn
 

I am building a Chuckanu (Dave Gentry's Chuckanut opened up a bit for more room so it is more like a canoe - because kayaks suck) and I needed some floorboards. I work for a building supply store, and we get 12' long pallets.

I took one home and cut the boards off with a saws-all. I then took a pneumatic nail punch and punched out the heads, easy as pie.

All was good, except these  boards were a hair over 3/4" thick. I was wondering how to get them down to about 3/8".  I could have done the smart thing and ripped them on edge on my table saw. It's mostly safe. Mostly.

However, I have just purchased a used planer/thicknesser. What better way to make skinny boards out of thick boards?

1 1/2 GARBAGE BAGS of shavings later, I have my sticks.

Good news is my planer works. I should probably get new blades.


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Richard Green
 

Bummer.  The porch and deck is typically a very good paint.  Doing the deck on Passage, it was important to squeegee the aerobal initial coat on the deck through the weave of the cloth.  Perhaps there was too much reliance on surface bonding with the sheet.  I wonder if glass cloth woulda done better for penetration?

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 4:39 PM, Case Turner <dirtsailor2003@...> wrote:

Painted with porch and deck. Glue failed. Cloth peeled off. 

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 27, 2020, at 4:23 PM, Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:

When I built Passage, I epoxied the decks with a couple rolled on coats of epoxy, then laid 10 oz cloth in Aerobal, made sure it was well coated, painted over it with Wards (at the time) porch and deck paint.  28 years later I saw the boat still on the same coat of paint.  I can’t even find Aerobal online to show a link.  It was an aviation product as I recall.  

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 1:37 PM, Dave <david@...> wrote:

I use TB3 50/50 as a sanding sealer on wood to be painted. Great stuff. It really is waterproof. I assembled outdoor furniture with it, no paint, 7 years later, still strong. The bedsheet material is the issue with most of these tests; the plastic or cotton sheeting won't stand up to the UV from the sun. Paint it and it should last a long time. I have yet to test 2 oz fiberglass with TB3 and paint. I would guess it to be really tough. 
 
My Dad had cotton duck covered spruce canoes, they went years out in the rain and snow. Lots of paint was the secret. 
 
David
 
 



Re: Cheap fiberglass

Case Turner
 

Painted with porch and deck. Glue failed. Cloth peeled off. 

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 27, 2020, at 4:23 PM, Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:

When I built Passage, I epoxied the decks with a couple rolled on coats of epoxy, then laid 10 oz cloth in Aerobal, made sure it was well coated, painted over it with Wards (at the time) porch and deck paint.  28 years later I saw the boat still on the same coat of paint.  I can’t even find Aerobal online to show a link.  It was an aviation product as I recall.  

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 1:37 PM, Dave <david@...> wrote:

I use TB3 50/50 as a sanding sealer on wood to be painted. Great stuff. It really is waterproof. I assembled outdoor furniture with it, no paint, 7 years later, still strong. The bedsheet material is the issue with most of these tests; the plastic or cotton sheeting won't stand up to the UV from the sun. Paint it and it should last a long time. I have yet to test 2 oz fiberglass with TB3 and paint. I would guess it to be really tough. 
 
My Dad had cotton duck covered spruce canoes, they went years out in the rain and snow. Lots of paint was the secret. 
 
David
 
 


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Richard Green
 

When I built Passage, I epoxied the decks with a couple rolled on coats of epoxy, then laid 10 oz cloth in Aerobal, made sure it was well coated, painted over it with Wards (at the time) porch and deck paint.  28 years later I saw the boat still on the same coat of paint.  I can’t even find Aerobal online to show a link.  It was an aviation product as I recall.  

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 1:37 PM, Dave <david@...> wrote:

I use TB3 50/50 as a sanding sealer on wood to be painted. Great stuff. It really is waterproof. I assembled outdoor furniture with it, no paint, 7 years later, still strong. The bedsheet material is the issue with most of these tests; the plastic or cotton sheeting won't stand up to the UV from the sun. Paint it and it should last a long time. I have yet to test 2 oz fiberglass with TB3 and paint. I would guess it to be really tough. 
 
My Dad had cotton duck covered spruce canoes, they went years out in the rain and snow. Lots of paint was the secret. 
 
David
 
 


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Sounds like TB3 just isn't very UV resistant.
Case were your pieces coated with paint, or was the UV getting to the glue? Did the fabric fail or the glue?
Cotton should be pretty UV resistant, Work shirts last years. And people used to dry all their cotton in the sun. Plus cotton sails.
-Jove

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 3:02 PM Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
That's what I figured


Re: Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

 

One of the links to naphtha launches I gave you led me to the Museum of Retro Technology. A lot of strange fun stuff there. A great time waster. :o)

http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/museum.htm

The article I recalled about naphtha launches was by L. Francis Herreshoff, originally published in The Rudder and reprinted in An L. Francis Herreshoff Reader.

Is Herreshoff an "agricultural" name in German? <g>

--
John <@Jkohnen>
In politics, absurdity is not a handicap. (Napoleon Bonaparte)


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Re: Cheap fiberglass

Dave
 

I use TB3 50/50 as a sanding sealer on wood to be painted. Great stuff. It really is waterproof. I assembled outdoor furniture with it, no paint, 7 years later, still strong. The bedsheet material is the issue with most of these tests; the plastic or cotton sheeting won't stand up to the UV from the sun. Paint it and it should last a long time. I have yet to test 2 oz fiberglass with TB3 and paint. I would guess it to be really tough. 
 
My Dad had cotton duck covered spruce canoes, they went years out in the rain and snow. Lots of paint was the secret. 
 
David
 
 


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

That's what I figured 


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Case Turner
 

I did an experiment a few years back with it. Used TB3 and bed sheet. Put one piece in a bucket of water to simulate a bait being in the water and the other chunk I left out in the weather to simulate being stored outside. 

I started the experiment in August and it ended March. 

Both failed. Both were fine until the rain and snow hit 

Case

Sent from not here

On Nov 27, 2020, at 11:41 AM, Richard Green <chaos5@...> wrote:

Trouble with using the bed sheet is every morning after you’ve slept in the camper it gets rumpled and you have remake it…

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 11:31 AM, Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany@...> wrote:

I was looking at home made campers on YouTube & there was someone coating his plywood with watered down titebond 3 then covering it with a bed sheet then more watered down titebond. He then painted it. The finish was rough. I can visualize all of it peeling off in a couple of years. I know titebond is a great glue, but this good? Anyone ever done this? 


Re: Cheap fiberglass

Richard Green
 

Trouble with using the bed sheet is every morning after you’ve slept in the camper it gets rumpled and you have remake it…

Rich

On Nov 27, 2020, at 11:31 AM, Jhcalbany@... via groups.io <Jhcalbany@...> wrote:

I was looking at home made campers on YouTube & there was someone coating his plywood with watered down titebond 3 then covering it with a bed sheet then more watered down titebond. He then painted it. The finish was rough. I can visualize all of it peeling off in a couple of years. I know titebond is a great glue, but this good? Anyone ever done this? 


Cheap fiberglass

Jhcalbany@aol.com
 

I was looking at home made campers on YouTube & there was someone coating his plywood with watered down titebond 3 then covering it with a bed sheet then more watered down titebond. He then painted it. The finish was rough. I can visualize all of it peeling off in a couple of years. I know titebond is a great glue, but this good? Anyone ever done this? 


Re: Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

 

Thanks, Pete. Uncle Westy's book is indeed marvelous, and I should dig my copy out even if it doesn't have a chapter on naphtha launches. :o) Not as much fun as reading Weston Farmer (I believe he's the fellow who commented about how so many of the small boat writers in National Fisherman had "agricultural" names -- Gardner, Culler, Farmer... <g>):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha_launch

https://www.gasenginemagazine.com/engines-a-z/the-naphtha-engine

http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/POWER/petrol/petrol.htm

I hope everyone had a Good Thanksgiving. Mary and I are doing our dinner today.

On 11/27/2020 9:52 AM, Pete L wrote:
Weston Farmer mentions naptha engines in his marvelous book "From My Old Boatshop", but infrequently. He seemed to be much more interested in gas engines in that book. I've read quite a few Rudder magazines from the very early 1900's; its interesting, thinking about it, that explosions of any kind - naptha or gasolene - are not mentioned as far as I can recall. Pete
...
I think Westy Farmer
wrote an article about naphtha launches. I'll have to dig up my copy of
From My Old Boatshop and look...
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Any fool can carry on, but a wise man knows how to shorten sail in time. (Joseph Conrad)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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Re: Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

Pete Leenhouts
 

Weston Farmer mentions naptha engines in his marvelous book "From My Old Boatshop", but infrequently. He seemed to be much more interested in gas engines in that book. I've read quite a few Rudder magazines from the very early 1900's; its interesting, thinking about it, that explosions of any kind - naptha or gasolene - are not mentioned as far as I can recall. Pete 


-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Nov 26, 2020 1:59 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

I've read that flashback fires from the boilers weren't uncommon in
naphtha launches, but, while they looked spectacular at night, they
didn't cause any damage, and serious accidents were rare. It seems
amazing that a contraption that heated a liquid similar to gasoline in a
boiler to make "steam" could have such a good safety record.

IIRC, there was only one manufacturer of naphtha powerplants, and they
were only put in a few makes of boats, with tight control from the
engine maker on the installation. The engine compartment was metal
lined, and the engine and boiler were installed as a unit. The fuel tank
was up in the bow, and the fuel line was routed outside the hull, below
the waterline, between the tank and the powerplant. I think Westy Farmer
wrote an article about naphtha launches. I'll have to dig up my copy of
From My Old Boatshop and look...

Interesting boats, for sure. <g>

Today we take for granted hopping into our cars and driving down the
freeway at more than a mile a minute with a bomb in the trunk. Imagine
what would happen if gasoline engines hadn't been invented, and somebody
today tried to convince us that vehicles burning gasoline were safe. ;o)

On 11/25/2020 8:23 PM, Myles T wrote:
> The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity.  As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat.  Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions.  And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
>
> Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
>
> There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...
>


--
John <jkohnen@...>
As a general truth, communities prosper and flourish, or droop and
decline, in just the degree that they practise or neglect to practise
the primary duties of justice and humanity. (William Henry Seward)


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Naphtha Launches (was: Any Authors Out There?)

 

I've read that flashback fires from the boilers weren't uncommon in naphtha launches, but, while they looked spectacular at night, they didn't cause any damage, and serious accidents were rare. It seems amazing that a contraption that heated a liquid similar to gasoline in a boiler to make "steam" could have such a good safety record.

IIRC, there was only one manufacturer of naphtha powerplants, and they were only put in a few makes of boats, with tight control from the engine maker on the installation. The engine compartment was metal lined, and the engine and boiler were installed as a unit. The fuel tank was up in the bow, and the fuel line was routed outside the hull, below the waterline, between the tank and the powerplant. I think Westy Farmer wrote an article about naphtha launches. I'll have to dig up my copy of From My Old Boatshop and look...

Interesting boats, for sure. <g>

Today we take for granted hopping into our cars and driving down the freeway at more than a mile a minute with a bomb in the trunk. Imagine what would happen if gasoline engines hadn't been invented, and somebody today tried to convince us that vehicles burning gasoline were safe. ;o)

On 11/25/2020 8:23 PM, Myles T wrote:
The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...

--
John <@Jkohnen>
As a general truth, communities prosper and flourish, or droop and decline, in just the degree that they practise or neglect to practise the primary duties of justice and humanity. (William Henry Seward)
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Re: Any Authors Out There?

John Weiss
 

FWIW, I added this to the description on our Facebook page:

"Sail, rowing, and paddle craft using fiberglass, epoxy, carbon, Kevlar, etc. are all welcome! "Small" MAY mean trailerable, hand-launchable, or significantly smaller than the USS Nimitz... We just want to make "boat" a verb!"

On 11/25/20 20:23, Myles Twete wrote:
The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.
Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.
-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.
"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."
Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.


Re: Any Authors Out There?

Myles Twete
 

The cool thing about the 'naphta launches' was the simplicity. As with a steam boat, you needed a burner to create the phase change in the working fluid from liquid to vapor, but in the case of the naphtha launches, the working fluid was the same as the fluid burned to create the heat. Scary, convenient, compact and evidently not that many instances of fires/explosions. And unlike steam boats, you didn't need to have a licensed engineer onboard.

Evidently they didn't even require a throttle valve, simply control the fuel burn rate and the motor responded.

There was someone in Newberg I met once that had a naphtha engine---think I got to see it once...

-----Original Message-----
From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Kohnen
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:05 PM
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] Any Authors Out There?

Thanks, John. Alas, the ACBS is pretty much all about mahogany runabouts, leaving old-fashioned low-powered internal combustion boats out in the cold... Anybody got a naphtha launch? One of those would fit into the TSCA mission, not to mention being a lot of fun, especially for pyromaniacs! ;o) Steamboats fit too, but they've got there own organizations.

"The Traditional Small Craft Association, Inc., is a nonprofit educational organization working to preserve and continue the living traditions, skills, lore, and legends surrounding working and pleasure watercraft whose origins predate the marine gasoline engine. We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats, and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of traditional designs."

Anyway, the Ash Breeze won't be too picky, as long as you don't stretch "traditional" way too far.

Our steamer friends:

https://www.northweststeamsociety.org/

On 11/25/2020 5:40 PM, John W wrote:
Yes, the last sentence in the TSCA "mission statement" is

"We encourage the design, construction, and use of these boats,
and we embrace the contemporary variants and adaptations of
traditional designs."

Electric powered boats certainly come under this umbrella. Power
boats are more the domain of the Antique and Classic Boat Society, but
TSCA has never denied admission to a powered small boat.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican. (H. L. Mencken)


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