Date   

OpenCPN on Linux

johnacord
 

Since there has been some interest in OpenCPN, here is how my installation on Linux went. 

Start here:
https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual
and go to
OpenCPN User Manual
Getting Started
OpenCPN Installation
Ubuntu PPA

If you have generic Ubuntu there is a graphical install.  I am using Linux Mint (Ubuntu derivative) so I have to use Terminal & command line.

Open a Terminal and enter the following commands:
sudo apt-get install software-properties-common
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:opencpn/opencpn
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install opencpn
Depending on your Linux installation you may have some extra steps compared to the above, probably to "fix" packages.

On Mint a menu group "Edcation" was created with a category OpenCPN.

From CPN menu 'Options', 'Charts', Add Directory where your chart files are located.  I am using NOAA BSB charts and once CPN knows where they are CPN finds them and ready to use.

When I first opened CPN it displayed the world map for the other side of the world so you would need to zoom out and find your area, then zoom in to see your chart areas.

The chart display quality is every bit as good as my $300 program 'Coastal Explorer', and the user interface seems to be also just as good.  Creating a route was just as same

Tides & Currents seems to be missing from the tool bar.  Next is to find out why!

More soon as I use it.

John A


Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

johnacord
 

What tablet do you like?

Does it have an internal GPS (not phone or wifi requiring internet to use), or if an external GPS used then what type (usb/bluetooth/wireless)? 

thanks,
John A


Re: [TSCA-Puget] [oregoncoots] Navionics for Dummies

 

The annual subscription for Navionics US & Canada for Android is $21.99. I believe it's $19.99 for the US alone. US dollar$. Downloaded charts remain usable after your subscription runs out, but any info you have to get over the Interweb stops working.

On April 3, 2020 7:31:09 PM PDT, John A wrote:
What is the annual subscription cost for charts, US & Canada?

After one year do the charts become unusable if you do not renew ?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.


Re: Navionics for Dummies

 

I should have mentioned that the Navionics I'm addressing is for Android and Apple mobile devices. Navionics for mobile devices requires a yearly subscription for charts, and for just a few dollars more than the US only charts you can get Canadian charts to boot. One thing to like about Navionics even if you don't like the vector charts. <g>

One of these days I'll put together some "for dummies" stuff on OpenCPN for PCs and Linux. I don't yet know a good way to get Canadian charts that'll work with that program.

On 4/3/2020 5:15 PM, John A wrote:
Hey John,
That's the kind of stuff we PC (linux & win) sort of folks find very informative.
How about adding something about getting Canadian charts?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Anyone can tell the truth, but only very few of us can make epigrams. (W. Somerset Maugham)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Navionics for Dummies

johnacord
 

Hey John,

That's the kind of stuff we PC (linux & win) sort of folks find very informative.

How about adding something about getting Canadian charts?   

thanks,
John A


Navionics for Dummies

 

A few more basic Navionics tutorials.

If you haven't added a memory card to your devise, do so and tell Navionics to start charts and other stuff on the card. Navionics charts, being "vector" charts, don't take up much memory, but you've probably got a bunch of other stuff on your device. You may also want to use a "raster" chart nav program, like OpenCPN, and those charts do take up a bunch of memory:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/Memory.pdf

Downloading charts to use on the water, or otherwise unplugged from the Interweb:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/NewCharts.pdf

Deleting unwanted charts:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/DeleteCharts.pdf

Have fun! But take care of yourselves, and wash your hands.


--
John <@Jkohnen>
The first day of spring was once the time for taking the young virgins into the fields, there in dalliance to set an example in fertility for nature to follow. Now we just set the clocks an hour ahead and change the oil in the crankcase. (E. B. White)

--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

 

Thanks for looking that up, Jove. I'll have to print that out and post it in the shop so I can remember. <g>

So, Randy's Kohnen Scarfing Jig is clearly a "jig". Something that, say, positions stock on a drill press table to bore evenly spaced holes is clearly, a fixture. But what about the device Randy used to cut scarfs on the table saw? It doesn't guide the tool, but it actively guides the stock into the tool. The same conundrum applies to countless table saw sleds and guides. Hmmm... How many angels can dance on the head of a pin? When in doubt, I'll just call them "gizmos". <g>

On 4/1/2020 10:40 PM, Jove wrote:
Ok..... I had to google it!
“The most basic difference, is that a *jig* is a type of tool used to hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A *Jig also* controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a *fixture* is a support or work holding device used to hold work in place. It never guide the tool.”
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it. (Edith Sitwell)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


More stuff to go

Electri-Cal
 

First off, I can take photos as needed for private replies.  Probably most of the boat gear I have ought to go to a coot in build mode.  I also have rifle, pistol, and shotgun reloading setups.  Two RCBS Rockchucker presses, with most die sets.  Good 12 ga. trap reloader setup, with a lot of boxes of ammo in AA trap.  Also some powder, primers for this stuff.  Might be worth a visit here, or a request for a full reloader set up price if that works out.  Might even trade for something else, but I'm down to one boat, more fishing gear than I'll ever use, and a Yamaha 400 scooter, at last.  Thought i'd ask here one time before I have to pack and ship stuff.  Good prices, some gifting if I have what you need.  Will take some digging in the closits, but lots of gear for archery or gun people.

The barn is almost cleared out, yea !!  One more trailer rental load to go, after the virus is over.  The electric 1000 watt EV bike is finally done, and a car carrier too.  I hope all the coots take this down time to prepare for the summer, and that this is over by then.  Next November maybe we will get a chance to consider a different route than a "Family Feud" type of tv show, tired of that one. 

Give me a return mail, and we can talk about it privately, thanks. ----  Cal Drake


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ok..... I had to google it!
The most basic difference, is that a jig is a type of tool used to hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A Jig also controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a fixture is a support or work holding device used to hold work in place. It never guide the tool.”


On Mar 29, 2020, at 3:42 PM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

John,

You are very welcome for the naming.   Cutting the scarfs with the track saw is much less scary than cutting the scarfs with the tablesaw.  In the next few days I will cut the scarfs for the gunwales and then glue them up. 

Randy


Re: Someday, again...

elaineginader
 

You too John and Mary.


On Wed, Apr 1, 2020, 2:48 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Thanks, Dan. We will do it again someday.

Everybody take care of yourselves, and wash your hands!

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject:        Someday, again...
Date:   Tue, 31 Mar 2020 10:55:27 -0700
From:   Dan Rogers

Just eight lines.  I remember it hanging, in a little frame,at the top
of my grandma’s stairs, leading to that dark and spooky attic.

“Jes’ supposin’ you were here

Or I was there with you

And we could get together

As we often used to do

And sit a while and talk and smile

Without no pomp or posin’

Or frills or fuss but just be us

Doggone it!  Jes’ supposin’!”

Dan.


--
John <jkohnen@...>
If it ain't broke, you're not trying. (Red Green)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com





Someday, again...

 

Thanks, Dan. We will do it again someday.

Everybody take care of yourselves, and wash your hands!

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Someday, again...
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 10:55:27 -0700
From: Dan Rogers

Just eight lines.  I remember it hanging, in a little frame,at the top of my grandma’s stairs, leading to that dark and spooky attic.

“Jes’ supposin’ you were here

Or I was there with you

And we could get together

As we often used to do

And sit a while and talk and smile

Without no pomp or posin’

Or frills or fuss but just be us

Doggone it!  Jes’ supposin’!”

Dan.


--
John <@Jkohnen>
If it ain't broke, you're not trying. (Red Green)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Something for the Steamboat Buffs

Pete Leenhouts
 

Flickr has lots of pictures of the MacKenzie River system, for those who are interested, and, if you keep looking, some of the current vessels plying the river. 

Thanks for finding another rabbit hole, John, and a very interesting one at that! 

Pete
Olympic Peninsula  



-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Mar 29, 2020 4:20 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Something for the Steamboat Buffs

Forced isolation has often found me lying on the couch with a cat on top
of me diving down various rabbit holes on the Interweb on my tablet. The
other night I started out looking up Yellowknife on Wikipedia, something
to do with the Aurora Explorer's sistership, which is a floating home
there, Yellowknife is on Great Slave Lake, at the head of the Mackenzie
River, so I found myself looking at the riverboats and tugs of the
Mackenzie River system, which is huge! Some of the steamboats in the
early days were pretty interesting. It was mighty wild country in the
Old Days, and so were some of the steamboat builders. <g> Unfortunately,
most surviving photos are of the larger, more refined (for the
wilderness <g>) craft, but in the background there might be some curious
contraption, and there might be some interesting small craft in the
foreground:


Today I was on the couch listening to Stompin' Tom Connors sing "The
Cremation of Sam McGee" put to music.

"There are strange things done in the midnight sun
      By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
      That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
      But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
      I cremated Sam McGee...."

Just where is Lake Lebarge? Wikipedia says it's really "Lake Leberge"
but Rob't Service fudged the name a bit to make it rhyme with "marge".
it's a big wide spot in the Yukon River north of Whitehorse in the
Yukon. OK. But, "in spring 2009, researchers found the A. J. Goddard, a
Gold Rush sternwheeler that sunk in 1901, killing three of its crew." A
real steamboat wreck near the "marge" of Lake Leberge! :o) But what a
steamboat! Sea attachment.

The A. J. Goddard and a sister were prefabbed of steel in Seattle and
sent north with the first of the gold rush into the Yukon. The parts
were packed over White Pass and Chilcoot Pass(!) and assembled on the
bank of Lake Bennet near Whitehorse, where thousands of hopeful
prospectors were building wooden boats to go down the Yukon River to
Dawson City.


--
John <jkohnen@...>
"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is
the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. (Alfred North
Whitehead)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.





Something for the Steamboat Buffs

 

Forced isolation has often found me lying on the couch with a cat on top of me diving down various rabbit holes on the Interweb on my tablet. The other night I started out looking up Yellowknife on Wikipedia, something to do with the Aurora Explorer's sistership, which is a floating home there, Yellowknife is on Great Slave Lake, at the head of the Mackenzie River, so I found myself looking at the riverboats and tugs of the Mackenzie River system, which is huge! Some of the steamboats in the early days were pretty interesting. It was mighty wild country in the Old Days, and so were some of the steamboat builders. <g> Unfortunately, most surviving photos are of the larger, more refined (for the wilderness <g>) craft, but in the background there might be some curious contraption, and there might be some interesting small craft in the foreground:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boats_of_the_Mackenzie_River_watershed

Today I was on the couch listening to Stompin' Tom Connors sing "The Cremation of Sam McGee" put to music.

"There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee...."

Just where is Lake Lebarge? Wikipedia says it's really "Lake Leberge" but Rob't Service fudged the name a bit to make it rhyme with "marge". it's a big wide spot in the Yukon River north of Whitehorse in the Yukon. OK. But, "in spring 2009, researchers found the A. J. Goddard, a Gold Rush sternwheeler that sunk in 1901, killing three of its crew." A real steamboat wreck near the "marge" of Lake Leberge! :o) But what a steamboat! Sea attachment.

The A. J. Goddard and a sister were prefabbed of steel in Seattle and sent north with the first of the gold rush into the Yukon. The parts were packed over White Pass and Chilcoot Pass(!) and assembled on the bank of Lake Bennet near Whitehorse, where thousands of hopeful prospectors were building wooden boats to go down the Yukon River to Dawson City.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._J._Goddard

--
John <@Jkohnen>
"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. (Alfred North Whitehead)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Randy Torgerson
 

John,

You are very welcome for the naming.   Cutting the scarfs with the track saw is much less scary than cutting the scarfs with the tablesaw.  In the next few days I will cut the scarfs for the gunwales and then glue them up. 

Randy


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

 

That's real neat, Randy, very clever! And thanks fpr naming it after me. <blush> ;o) That's very much the sort of thing I was thinking of, but I don't have a track saw, so I was thinking of using a fence. That'd require more attention from the operator, but could be mounted permanently to the contraption. Does anyone know if it's a "jig", or a "fixture"?

Congratulations on actually building yours, and not just thinking about it. <g>

On 3/28/2020 11:57 AM, Randt T wrote:
Back in January, John Kohnen and I were discussing scarfing jigs and I showed the jig I used on my table saw. John said “I've been thinking about a jig (or would it be a fixture? I never can keep that straight) for using a handheld circular saw, so I don't need to clean such a wide behind the tablesaw”
I have been under house arrest these last few weeks and I have not been allowed to work on the Tolman so I am working on the long neglected Puddle Duck Canoe.
I will need to scarf some parts for the gunwales so I decided to build the _Kohnen Scarfing Jig._The jig would use my track saw and be portable so I could take it to RiversWest to cut the splash rail for the Tolman.The jig cuts a 1:8 scarf for material up to 1 inch tall and 1 inch wide.Since I cut both pieces at the same time the jig opens up to 2 plus change wide.This was arbitrary since and I can change it in the future.
The design goals were to:
1.    Not hurt myself
2.    Not hurt the blade by cutting any screws.
3.    Easy to setup.
4.    Keep myself busy.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Self respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious. (H. L. Mencken)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Real Computer Program to Use with Navionics

Richard Green
 

Same technique I have used.  Also, one can listen for the frogs near shore as they holler out the water depth which you can hear as you get too close to the shore.  Knee deep, knee deep they sing.

Rich

On Mar 28, 2020, at 12:49 PM, cherrill boissonou <cboissonou@...> wrote:

Jeez...I don’t know ,Bob.....I just stare-off in the distance, pick some mythological point, and head for it......I magically avoid rocks and other protrusions by thinking positive thoughts and repeating my mantra over and over: “It’s always worked, It’s always wor........
Sounds pretty good, huh.
Earl


On Mar 28, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Bob Larkin <bob@...> wrote:

Slightly related - NOAA used to do 18423 and 18445 "Small Craft Series" for Puget Sound, that in printed form were a wonderful solution to having something!  These have been discontinued in print AND in file form.  But, if anybody is interested, I have the *files* for 2015, near the end of there run.  They are big, but if anyone wants these, I could try to post these for others.  If you have printed versions, keep them!   Bob


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Richard Green
 

Whenever I’ve needed long wood, over say 12’, for a toe rail or somesuch I’ve knocked together a jig on a table saw sled piece of ply with a couple 1X2 or 2X2 as available for a 12 to 1 scarf.  Maybe done this four or five times over the years.  Always works well, easy to control the wood to assemble a 24’ rail length.  Small boats, small dimensional wood.  Below, gluing a 12 to 1 scarf for the toe rail when I built Jaunty.  When gluing it’s important to have good support to hold the joint, visible between the clamps, firmly in place, straight and level or perhaps flat.

Rich


On Mar 28, 2020, at 3:25 PM, Jove Lachman-Curl <jovelc87@...> wrote:

Back when I was making my SOF kayak I scarfed all the stringers and gunnels from 10’ wood.
It was a bit tricky to get them with no twist.  Any off squareness of the cut resulted in an eventuated twist from one piece to the next. After my table say jig didn’t work out I ended up clamping then to the bench and using a hand plane. Reading this thread I was just thinking that if the jig was made to overlap the two pieces the way they’d be in the boat -end to end, then any angular inaccuracy would cancel out.
Im a big fan of moving the smaller object, long skinny noodles of wood in a table saw is a pain. Next time I rip stringers i want to try it with the wood clamped to a long bench or saw horses, and a skill saw with a good fence.
-Jove


On Mar 28, 2020, at 2:04 PM, Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:

Last time I used binder clip clamps is when Blake and I built a model PDR for a class project he had in elementary school. 

<image0.jpeg>



Sent from not here

On Mar 28, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:



Back in January, John Kohnen and I were discussing scarfing jigs and I showed the jig I used on my table saw.  John said “I've been thinking about a jig (or would it be a fixture? I never can keep that straight) for using a handheld circular saw, so I don't need to clean such a wide behind the tablesaw”  
I have been under house arrest these last few weeks and I have not been allowed to work on the Tolman so I am working on the long neglected Puddle Duck Canoe. 
<0121121627 _Medium_.jpg>

I will need to scarf some parts for the gunwales so I decided to build the Kohnen Scarfing Jig.   The jig would use my track saw and be portable so I could take it to RiversWest to cut the splash rail for the Tolman.  The jig cuts a 1:8 scarf for material up to 1 inch tall and 1 inch wide.  Since I cut both pieces at the same time the jig opens up to 2 plus change wide.  This was arbitrary since and I can change it in the future.  


The design goals were to:

1.    Not hurt myself
2.    Not hurt the blade by cutting any screws.  
3.    Easy to setup.
4.    Keep myself busy.
<2020-03-28 11.08.47 _Medium_.jpg>

I jointed some four foot long 2x4’s on two sides and then planed the boards to 1-1/4 thick.  Two of the 2x4’s will be put on the bottom to keep the jig together in case the plywood was cut though and to allow space to clamp the track to the jig.  I jockeyed the track around and found that 12 inches by 45 inches was the best size for the plywood. 
<2020-03-28 11.08.17 _Medium_.jpg>

I screwed the two support 2x4’s on the bottom and then worked out the size of the clamping 2x4’s should be 28 inches.  One of the clamping 2x4’s is screwed to the jig and the other is held in with clamps but I may use wedges in the future since I can now easily cut wedges quickly. 
<dummyfile.0.part>

I clamped some scrap in the jig and gave it a whorl.  As you can see from the pictures the jig worked very well.

 

Randy  

-- 
Dirt


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Back when I was making my SOF kayak I scarfed all the stringers and gunnels from 10’ wood.
It was a bit tricky to get them with no twist.  Any off squareness of the cut resulted in an eventuated twist from one piece to the next. After my table say jig didn’t work out I ended up clamping then to the bench and using a hand plane. Reading this thread I was just thinking that if the jig was made to overlap the two pieces the way they’d be in the boat -end to end, then any angular inaccuracy would cancel out.
Im a big fan of moving the smaller object, long skinny noodles of wood in a table saw is a pain. Next time I rip stringers i want to try it with the wood clamped to a long bench or saw horses, and a skill saw with a good fence.
-Jove


On Mar 28, 2020, at 2:04 PM, Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:

Last time I used binder clip clamps is when Blake and I built a model PDR for a class project he had in elementary school. 

<image0.jpeg>



Sent from not here

On Mar 28, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:



Back in January, John Kohnen and I were discussing scarfing jigs and I showed the jig I used on my table saw.  John said “I've been thinking about a jig (or would it be a fixture? I never can keep that straight) for using a handheld circular saw, so I don't need to clean such a wide behind the tablesaw” 

I have been under house arrest these last few weeks and I have not been allowed to work on the Tolman so I am working on the long neglected Puddle Duck Canoe. 

<0121121627 _Medium_.jpg>

I will need to scarf some parts for the gunwales so I decided to build the Kohnen Scarfing Jig.   The jig would use my track saw and be portable so I could take it to RiversWest to cut the splash rail for the Tolman.  The jig cuts a 1:8 scarf for material up to 1 inch tall and 1 inch wide.  Since I cut both pieces at the same time the jig opens up to 2 plus change wide.  This was arbitrary since and I can change it in the future. 

The design goals were to:

1.    Not hurt myself
2.    Not hurt the blade by cutting any screws. 
3.    Easy to setup.
4.    Keep myself busy.

<2020-03-28 11.08.47 _Medium_.jpg>

I jointed some four foot long 2x4’s on two sides and then planed the boards to 1-1/4 thick.  Two of the 2x4’s will be put on the bottom to keep the jig together in case the plywood was cut though and to allow space to clamp the track to the jig.  I jockeyed the track around and found that 12 inches by 45 inches was the best size for the plywood. 
<2020-03-28 11.08.17 _Medium_.jpg>

I screwed the two support 2x4’s on the bottom and then worked out the size of the clamping 2x4’s should be 28 inches.  One of the clamping 2x4’s is screwed to the jig and the other is held in with clamps but I may use wedges in the future since I can now easily cut wedges quickly.
<dummyfile.0.part>

I clamped some scrap in the jig and gave it a whorl.  As you can see from the pictures the jig worked very well.

 

Randy  


--
Dirt


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Case Turner
 

Last time I used binder clip clamps is when Blake and I built a model PDR for a class project he had in elementary school. 





Sent from not here

On Mar 28, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:



Back in January, John Kohnen and I were discussing scarfing jigs and I showed the jig I used on my table saw.  John said “I've been thinking about a jig (or would it be a fixture? I never can keep that straight) for using a handheld circular saw, so I don't need to clean such a wide behind the tablesaw” 

I have been under house arrest these last few weeks and I have not been allowed to work on the Tolman so I am working on the long neglected Puddle Duck Canoe. 

<0121121627 _Medium_.jpg>

I will need to scarf some parts for the gunwales so I decided to build the Kohnen Scarfing Jig.   The jig would use my track saw and be portable so I could take it to RiversWest to cut the splash rail for the Tolman.  The jig cuts a 1:8 scarf for material up to 1 inch tall and 1 inch wide.  Since I cut both pieces at the same time the jig opens up to 2 plus change wide.  This was arbitrary since and I can change it in the future. 

The design goals were to:

1.    Not hurt myself
2.    Not hurt the blade by cutting any screws. 
3.    Easy to setup.
4.    Keep myself busy.

<2020-03-28 11.08.47 _Medium_.jpg>

I jointed some four foot long 2x4’s on two sides and then planed the boards to 1-1/4 thick.  Two of the 2x4’s will be put on the bottom to keep the jig together in case the plywood was cut though and to allow space to clamp the track to the jig.  I jockeyed the track around and found that 12 inches by 45 inches was the best size for the plywood. 
<2020-03-28 11.08.17 _Medium_.jpg>

I screwed the two support 2x4’s on the bottom and then worked out the size of the clamping 2x4’s should be 28 inches.  One of the clamping 2x4’s is screwed to the jig and the other is held in with clamps but I may use wedges in the future since I can now easily cut wedges quickly.
<dummyfile.0.part>

I clamped some scrap in the jig and gave it a whorl.  As you can see from the pictures the jig worked very well.

 

Randy  


--
Dirt


Re: Real Computer Program to Use with Navionics

cherrill boissonou
 

Jeez...I don’t know ,Bob.....I just stare-off in the distance, pick some mythological point, and head for it......I magically avoid rocks and other protrusions by thinking positive thoughts and repeating my mantra over and over: “It’s always worked, It’s always wor........
Sounds pretty good, huh.
Earl


On Mar 28, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Bob Larkin <bob@...> wrote:

Slightly related - NOAA used to do 18423 and 18445 "Small Craft Series" for Puget Sound, that in printed form were a wonderful solution to having something!  These have been discontinued in print AND in file form.  But, if anybody is interested, I have the *files* for 2015, near the end of there run.  They are big, but if anyone wants these, I could try to post these for others.  If you have printed versions, keep them!   Bob