Date   

Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

Myles Twete
 

The last operating river steamboat in Pacific NW US arguably is the steamer Portland---built in 1947 and operated by the Port of Portland until 1981, it was the last steam-fueled sternwheeler towboat in operation.  She is operated today several times a year by the Oregon Maritime Museum including trips that take member/passengers on local river trips.

http://www.oregonmaritimemuseum.org/

 

https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2017/07/portlands_sternwheeler_a_boat.html

 

 

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of johnacord
Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:35 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

John,

Do you know when the last Steamboats ran on the rivers around your part of the world?

Here is a Steamboat that I know was still operating up in British Columbia in 1950, as I rode on it! :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyie_(sternwheeler)

I was with a school group visiting Argenta, B.C., at the north end of Kootney Lake.  They put the group of kids on the Moyie at Kaslo and we rode it up to Argenta stopping once at Johnson's landing to off load supplies and mail. 

John A


Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

johnacord
 

John,

Do you know when the last Steamboats ran on the rivers around your part of the world?

Here is a Steamboat that I know was still operating up in British Columbia in 1950, as I rode on it! :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyie_(sternwheeler)

I was with a school group visiting Argenta, B.C., at the north end of Kootney Lake.  They put the group of kids on the Moyie at Kaslo and we rode it up to Argenta stopping once at Johnson's landing to off load supplies and mail. 

John A


More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

Poking around on Wikipedia looking at steamboats on Oregon rivers I stumbled upon this shot of Echo, up the Coquille way back when. Echo isn't anything unusual, but I like the photo because it shows the sort of work the small steamboats, and later gas and diesel powered "milk boats", on the coastal rivers did, hauling supplies up the river and farm products down, stopping anyplace they needed to, Just a nice picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File%3AEcho_%28steamboat%29.jpg

The small boats aboard Echo are interesting too. That's clearly a flat-bottom skiff on the hurricane deck behind the Texas (if we can use such grand terms on such a humble craft <g>), but with higher sides than the usual steamboat skiff. It's hard to tell for sure if the boat on the guard is the same sort of skiff, or even flat-bottomed, but the great flare in the sides of the transom hint at the twisted sides of a steamboat skiff. Hmmm... You can see a typical steamboat skiff (or "yawl boat" as Chapelle called them in ASSC) aboard the Willamette River steamboat Beaver (she went up to the Stikine River during the Klondike gold rush!):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File%3ABeaver_%28sternwheeler%29.jpeg

John McCallum swears that McKenzie River drift boats evolved from steamboat skiffs, whatever Roger Fletcher says. <g> I think he's probably right. He designed his own interpretation of a steamboat skiff, and I owned the prototype for a while (he's got it now):

https://flic.kr/p/r5Ljzc

https://flic.kr/p/rjVDcC

http://www.boat-links.com/images/McKenzieSkiff.gif

This photo taken at Scottsburg, on the Umpqua shows a variety of interesting boats that plied that river in the Old Days. The caption says the shot was taken circa 1900, but because of all the "gas boats" I'd guess it was taken a little bit later:

http://photos.salemhistory.net/cdm/singleitem/collection/max/id/2901

--
John <@Jkohnen>
A belief which leaves no place for doubt is not a belief; it is a superstition. (Jose Bergamin)



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: OpenCPN on Linux

johnacord
 

Good note Bob, thanks.

I found that the manual was not correct with respect to tides and currents, and there were some subtle differences in the installation, probably a difference with what is in the repository ppa or the current build.  The Harmonic files were installed in /usr/share instead of /usr/local/share.  Once the location was set correctly OpenCPN found them OK.  But I could not find any way to get the Tide/Current buttons displayed on the toolbar so could not see tides & currents.  I found that if I set ShowMenuBar in Settings User Interface then I could display tides and currents with checking the appropriate in Menu Bar View.  Alternatively you can show tides and currents from the Chart Panel Options.


John A


Re: OpenCPN on Linux

 

Thanks, John. That's useful info. You can be our point man for OpenCPN on Linux. <g>

I think I got rid of my little Linux "netbook" sfter I got the Samsung tablet...

BTW, a "netbook" or laptop computer works fine for navigation, but they use a lot of power compared to a tablet. No problem for those with a Big outboard, but if you've got an alternator that puts out maybe maybe 6 amps... Dan from Almostcanada found that out last year using a laptop in walkabout.

On 4/4/2020 10:41 AM, john a wrote:
Since there has been some interest in OpenCPN, here is how my installation on Linux went.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
He was a bold man that first eat an oyster. (Jonathan Swift)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

 

On Bob Larkin's advice I got a Samsung 10.1" Galaxy tablet. That was three years ago and it's worked fine. I can't vouch for any of the other reputable brands, but I tried a cheapo Chinese tablet in the early stages of my electronic nav experimentation and wasn't happy with it. Spring for a good tablet; they aren't that expensive, when compared to a less versatile dedicated navigation unit. But you don't need the latest model tablet, so a used or "refurbished" one could save you some money. Indeed, my Samsung was "refurbished", and that saved me about $50 at the time.

Be sure to get a tablet with a built-in GPS. The alternatives are unsatisfactory, and most decent tablets come with a GPS anyway. I like the 10.1" display because it's easy to see without getting close, and big enough to do stuff on. I bought it thinking it's be a dedicated navigation device, but I like it so well that I use it all the time. <g> I can see that in a small, open boat a smaller tablet might have advantages.

I'm curious about what other people have done to set up a navigation tablet in their boats, particularly open boats. How do you power it? Shade the display? Protect it from the weather?

My situation is a motorboat with a (feeble) charging system. I have the GPS mounted on a small folding TV wall mount (from Harbor Freight) just inside the door to the cabin. I can close the companionway hatch most of the way, and the door all the way. protecting the tablet from the weather, and shading the display. I leave the tablet plugged into a 12 volt USB charger all the time when navigating, because using the GPS runs the battery down relatively quickly. Not all 12 volt USB chargers have enough oomph; a "regular" one will barely keep up with the draw when navigating. Chargers built for fast charging newer tablets aren't expensice, and have plenty of oomph. Here's the one I use:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00VH84L5E/themotherofal-20

But I may look for one that can be wired in directly, rather than plugging into a cigar lighter socket...

On 4/4/2020 9:49 AM, john a wrote:
What tablet do you like?
Does it have an internal GPS (not phone or wifi requiring internet to use), or if an external GPS used then what type (usb/bluetooth/wireless)?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim. (George Santayana)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: OpenCPN on Linux

Bob Larkin
 

Thanks for the report, John.

Make sure you have the HARMONIC and HARMONIC.IDX files that have the tide and current data.  The writeup
https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual:toolbar_buttons:tides_and_currents
is a good tutorial.

I have used OpenCPN under laptop Ubuntu for many years with much happiness.  I also have an AIS receiver hooked to the laptop and it also works well.

I loaded the non-pay and pay versions of OpenCPN for Android onto my phone.  The pay version is better, but, lets face it, the screen will always be too small for so much activity.  It works, but we need more.

Have fun,  Bob


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

Some years ago I made a "scarfing jig" by welding a few pieces of angle iron, making a frame, and bolting a router on to a heavy plywood carrier to move back & forth across the 4 ft  width of a piece of plywood.  It sort-of worked,but the 1/4 in plywood (yes the plain stuff not the high dollar stuff0 did not want to lie flat enough that there in lied the difficulty.  - - since I have sandwich secured  plywood sheets between layers of 2x stock and scarfed with a belt sander using a rather coarse sanding belt. 
  Then at glue-up doing the thin epoxy first for soak-in and epoxy thickened with corn starch or very fine wood flour for adhesive glue-up seems to work great.  use a couple of very small finishing nails to keep the scarf from squeezing apart as I clamp the whole scarfed area with 2x on each side - wax paper between the 2x and the plywood and some added thickness in the middle (remember I am scarfing whole 8ft x 4ft plywood sheets) to keep the clamping tension sufficient in the middle..  Yes, this is odd business, but what can one do when one wants plywood more than 8 ft long and has decent bending qualities.  It worked for me - may work for you.   - AND the work surface was indeed large to accommodate the length of the 2 pieces being scarfed.  - - Best of luck on your projects -
Gerard Mittelstaedt in McAllen, (deep south) Texas


On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 2:20 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Thanks for looking that up, Jove. I'll have to print that out and post
it in the shop so I can remember. <g>

So, Randy's Kohnen Scarfing Jig is clearly a "jig". Something that, say,
positions stock on a drill press table to bore evenly spaced holes is
clearly, a fixture. But what about the device Randy used to cut scarfs
on the table saw? It doesn't guide the tool, but it actively guides the
stock into the tool. The same conundrum applies to countless table saw
sleds and guides. Hmmm... How many angels can dance on the head of a
pin? When in doubt, I'll just call them "gizmos". <g>

On 4/1/2020 10:40 PM, Jove wrote:
> Ok..... I had to google it!
> “The most basic difference, is that a *jig* is a type of tool used to
> hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A *Jig
> also* controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a
> *fixture* is a support or work holding device used to hold work in
> place. It never guide the tool.”
--
John <jkohnen@...>
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.
(Edith Sitwell)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


OpenCPN on Linux

johnacord
 

Since there has been some interest in OpenCPN, here is how my installation on Linux went. 

Start here:
https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual
and go to
OpenCPN User Manual
Getting Started
OpenCPN Installation
Ubuntu PPA

If you have generic Ubuntu there is a graphical install.  I am using Linux Mint (Ubuntu derivative) so I have to use Terminal & command line.

Open a Terminal and enter the following commands:
sudo apt-get install software-properties-common
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:opencpn/opencpn
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install opencpn
Depending on your Linux installation you may have some extra steps compared to the above, probably to "fix" packages.

On Mint a menu group "Edcation" was created with a category OpenCPN.

From CPN menu 'Options', 'Charts', Add Directory where your chart files are located.  I am using NOAA BSB charts and once CPN knows where they are CPN finds them and ready to use.

When I first opened CPN it displayed the world map for the other side of the world so you would need to zoom out and find your area, then zoom in to see your chart areas.

The chart display quality is every bit as good as my $300 program 'Coastal Explorer', and the user interface seems to be also just as good.  Creating a route was just as same

Tides & Currents seems to be missing from the tool bar.  Next is to find out why!

More soon as I use it.

John A


Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

johnacord
 

What tablet do you like?

Does it have an internal GPS (not phone or wifi requiring internet to use), or if an external GPS used then what type (usb/bluetooth/wireless)? 

thanks,
John A


Re: [TSCA-Puget] [oregoncoots] Navionics for Dummies

 

The annual subscription for Navionics US & Canada for Android is $21.99. I believe it's $19.99 for the US alone. US dollar$. Downloaded charts remain usable after your subscription runs out, but any info you have to get over the Interweb stops working.

On April 3, 2020 7:31:09 PM PDT, John A wrote:
What is the annual subscription cost for charts, US & Canada?

After one year do the charts become unusable if you do not renew ?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought. (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Sent from some sort of mobile device.


Re: Navionics for Dummies

 

I should have mentioned that the Navionics I'm addressing is for Android and Apple mobile devices. Navionics for mobile devices requires a yearly subscription for charts, and for just a few dollars more than the US only charts you can get Canadian charts to boot. One thing to like about Navionics even if you don't like the vector charts. <g>

One of these days I'll put together some "for dummies" stuff on OpenCPN for PCs and Linux. I don't yet know a good way to get Canadian charts that'll work with that program.

On 4/3/2020 5:15 PM, John A wrote:
Hey John,
That's the kind of stuff we PC (linux & win) sort of folks find very informative.
How about adding something about getting Canadian charts?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Anyone can tell the truth, but only very few of us can make epigrams. (W. Somerset Maugham)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Navionics for Dummies

johnacord
 

Hey John,

That's the kind of stuff we PC (linux & win) sort of folks find very informative.

How about adding something about getting Canadian charts?   

thanks,
John A


Navionics for Dummies

 

A few more basic Navionics tutorials.

If you haven't added a memory card to your devise, do so and tell Navionics to start charts and other stuff on the card. Navionics charts, being "vector" charts, don't take up much memory, but you've probably got a bunch of other stuff on your device. You may also want to use a "raster" chart nav program, like OpenCPN, and those charts do take up a bunch of memory:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/Memory.pdf

Downloading charts to use on the water, or otherwise unplugged from the Interweb:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/NewCharts.pdf

Deleting unwanted charts:

http://www.coots.org/navstuff/DeleteCharts.pdf

Have fun! But take care of yourselves, and wash your hands.


--
John <@Jkohnen>
The first day of spring was once the time for taking the young virgins into the fields, there in dalliance to set an example in fertility for nature to follow. Now we just set the clocks an hour ahead and change the oil in the crankcase. (E. B. White)

--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

 

Thanks for looking that up, Jove. I'll have to print that out and post it in the shop so I can remember. <g>

So, Randy's Kohnen Scarfing Jig is clearly a "jig". Something that, say, positions stock on a drill press table to bore evenly spaced holes is clearly, a fixture. But what about the device Randy used to cut scarfs on the table saw? It doesn't guide the tool, but it actively guides the stock into the tool. The same conundrum applies to countless table saw sleds and guides. Hmmm... How many angels can dance on the head of a pin? When in doubt, I'll just call them "gizmos". <g>

On 4/1/2020 10:40 PM, Jove wrote:
Ok..... I had to google it!
“The most basic difference, is that a *jig* is a type of tool used to hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A *Jig also* controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a *fixture* is a support or work holding device used to hold work in place. It never guide the tool.”
--
John <@Jkohnen>
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it. (Edith Sitwell)
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


More stuff to go

Electri-Cal
 

First off, I can take photos as needed for private replies.  Probably most of the boat gear I have ought to go to a coot in build mode.  I also have rifle, pistol, and shotgun reloading setups.  Two RCBS Rockchucker presses, with most die sets.  Good 12 ga. trap reloader setup, with a lot of boxes of ammo in AA trap.  Also some powder, primers for this stuff.  Might be worth a visit here, or a request for a full reloader set up price if that works out.  Might even trade for something else, but I'm down to one boat, more fishing gear than I'll ever use, and a Yamaha 400 scooter, at last.  Thought i'd ask here one time before I have to pack and ship stuff.  Good prices, some gifting if I have what you need.  Will take some digging in the closits, but lots of gear for archery or gun people.

The barn is almost cleared out, yea !!  One more trailer rental load to go, after the virus is over.  The electric 1000 watt EV bike is finally done, and a car carrier too.  I hope all the coots take this down time to prepare for the summer, and that this is over by then.  Next November maybe we will get a chance to consider a different route than a "Family Feud" type of tv show, tired of that one. 

Give me a return mail, and we can talk about it privately, thanks. ----  Cal Drake


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Ok..... I had to google it!
The most basic difference, is that a jig is a type of tool used to hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A Jig also controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a fixture is a support or work holding device used to hold work in place. It never guide the tool.”


On Mar 29, 2020, at 3:42 PM, Randy Torgerson <coots@...> wrote:

John,

You are very welcome for the naming.   Cutting the scarfs with the track saw is much less scary than cutting the scarfs with the tablesaw.  In the next few days I will cut the scarfs for the gunwales and then glue them up. 

Randy


Re: Someday, again...

elaineginader
 

You too John and Mary.


On Wed, Apr 1, 2020, 2:48 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Thanks, Dan. We will do it again someday.

Everybody take care of yourselves, and wash your hands!

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject:        Someday, again...
Date:   Tue, 31 Mar 2020 10:55:27 -0700
From:   Dan Rogers

Just eight lines.  I remember it hanging, in a little frame,at the top
of my grandma’s stairs, leading to that dark and spooky attic.

“Jes’ supposin’ you were here

Or I was there with you

And we could get together

As we often used to do

And sit a while and talk and smile

Without no pomp or posin’

Or frills or fuss but just be us

Doggone it!  Jes’ supposin’!”

Dan.


--
John <jkohnen@...>
If it ain't broke, you're not trying. (Red Green)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com





Someday, again...

 

Thanks, Dan. We will do it again someday.

Everybody take care of yourselves, and wash your hands!

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Someday, again...
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 10:55:27 -0700
From: Dan Rogers

Just eight lines.  I remember it hanging, in a little frame,at the top of my grandma’s stairs, leading to that dark and spooky attic.

“Jes’ supposin’ you were here

Or I was there with you

And we could get together

As we often used to do

And sit a while and talk and smile

Without no pomp or posin’

Or frills or fuss but just be us

Doggone it!  Jes’ supposin’!”

Dan.


--
John <@Jkohnen>
If it ain't broke, you're not trying. (Red Green)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: Something for the Steamboat Buffs

Pete Leenhouts
 

Flickr has lots of pictures of the MacKenzie River system, for those who are interested, and, if you keep looking, some of the current vessels plying the river. 

Thanks for finding another rabbit hole, John, and a very interesting one at that! 

Pete
Olympic Peninsula  



-----Original Message-----
From: John Kohnen <jkohnen@...>
To: Oregon Coots <oregoncoots@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Mar 29, 2020 4:20 pm
Subject: [oregoncoots] Something for the Steamboat Buffs

Forced isolation has often found me lying on the couch with a cat on top
of me diving down various rabbit holes on the Interweb on my tablet. The
other night I started out looking up Yellowknife on Wikipedia, something
to do with the Aurora Explorer's sistership, which is a floating home
there, Yellowknife is on Great Slave Lake, at the head of the Mackenzie
River, so I found myself looking at the riverboats and tugs of the
Mackenzie River system, which is huge! Some of the steamboats in the
early days were pretty interesting. It was mighty wild country in the
Old Days, and so were some of the steamboat builders. <g> Unfortunately,
most surviving photos are of the larger, more refined (for the
wilderness <g>) craft, but in the background there might be some curious
contraption, and there might be some interesting small craft in the
foreground:


Today I was on the couch listening to Stompin' Tom Connors sing "The
Cremation of Sam McGee" put to music.

"There are strange things done in the midnight sun
      By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
      That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
      But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
      I cremated Sam McGee...."

Just where is Lake Lebarge? Wikipedia says it's really "Lake Leberge"
but Rob't Service fudged the name a bit to make it rhyme with "marge".
it's a big wide spot in the Yukon River north of Whitehorse in the
Yukon. OK. But, "in spring 2009, researchers found the A. J. Goddard, a
Gold Rush sternwheeler that sunk in 1901, killing three of its crew." A
real steamboat wreck near the "marge" of Lake Leberge! :o) But what a
steamboat! Sea attachment.

The A. J. Goddard and a sister were prefabbed of steel in Seattle and
sent north with the first of the gold rush into the Yukon. The parts
were packed over White Pass and Chilcoot Pass(!) and assembled on the
bank of Lake Bennet near Whitehorse, where thousands of hopeful
prospectors were building wooden boats to go down the Yukon River to
Dawson City.


--
John <jkohnen@...>
"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is
the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. (Alfred North
Whitehead)


--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.