Date   

Re: Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

Case Turner
 

I installed this panel in my trailer. I removed the cigarette style port and added another duel usb plug. Has worked great for charging everything we use. Currently the switches run the lights and stereo in the trailer. At some point I’ll add a 12v fan. This company also makes a panel with just the USB ports

Cllena Dual USB Socket Charger... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0785LZQLK?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

Sent from not here

On Apr 8, 2020, at 2:15 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

Thanks, John. Does that USB charger "Fast charge" your Apple devices? The hardwired USB sockets I've already got in Lazy Jack are supposedly 2.1 amps per port, but won't deliver anywhere near that much to my tablets. Bob L explained (IIRC) that the USB standard limits the current delivered to charge a device to something like 1.2 amps. Apple and Samsung and Amazon Kindle, and perhaps other manufacturers, supply chargers that will deliver more current, if asked nicely by the device. Unfortunately, each manufacturer implements this slightly differently. <sigh> Fortunately, some USB charger makers have managed to come up with USB sockets that will fast charge a variety of modern devices. So, it'd be a major undertaking to make a homebrew fast USB charger out of a 12V to 5V dc-dc converter... Bob can explain the whole thing better than I. <g>

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00VH84L5E/themotherofal-20

The one you use doesn't mention that on its Amazon page, so I'm reluctant to order one without clarification.

Last year I replaced the USB charging cable for the Samsung tablet in Lazy Jack, and then the slow charger socket managed to keep up with the juice used to run the GPS and navigate. <shrug> (it took me a day or two of the Salish 100 to find where I'd stashed the Anker fast charger <g>). So maybe the cable was the problem, but I'd rather have ample available juice, rather than just barely enough...

When using the tablet to navigate all day with the slow charger and feeble cable, the tablet battery didn't run down all the way, and would charge up again when I turned the tablet off at night.

On 4/8/2020 7:55 AM, john acord wrote:
Here's the one I put in our boat. Keeps Claire's IPAD Mini and Iphone both charged while in use.
https://www.amazon.com/YonHan-Charger-Socket-Motorcycle-Vehicles/dp/B077F4ZGTZ
It's 2.4A per USB socket. Seems like you can find them with higher output if you look a bit. 3A seems maybe the usual limit. If you want more than that than wire in a 12V to 5V dc-dc converter and make your own :)
--
John <@Jkohnen>
He used statistics as a drunken man uses lampposts; for support rather than illumination. (Andrew Lang)


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Re: Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

 

Thanks, John. Does that USB charger "Fast charge" your Apple devices? The hardwired USB sockets I've already got in Lazy Jack are supposedly 2.1 amps per port, but won't deliver anywhere near that much to my tablets. Bob L explained (IIRC) that the USB standard limits the current delivered to charge a device to something like 1.2 amps. Apple and Samsung and Amazon Kindle, and perhaps other manufacturers, supply chargers that will deliver more current, if asked nicely by the device. Unfortunately, each manufacturer implements this slightly differently. <sigh> Fortunately, some USB charger makers have managed to come up with USB sockets that will fast charge a variety of modern devices. So, it'd be a major undertaking to make a homebrew fast USB charger out of a 12V to 5V dc-dc converter... Bob can explain the whole thing better than I. <g>

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00VH84L5E/themotherofal-20

The one you use doesn't mention that on its Amazon page, so I'm reluctant to order one without clarification.

Last year I replaced the USB charging cable for the Samsung tablet in Lazy Jack, and then the slow charger socket managed to keep up with the juice used to run the GPS and navigate. <shrug> (it took me a day or two of the Salish 100 to find where I'd stashed the Anker fast charger <g>). So maybe the cable was the problem, but I'd rather have ample available juice, rather than just barely enough...

When using the tablet to navigate all day with the slow charger and feeble cable, the tablet battery didn't run down all the way, and would charge up again when I turned the tablet off at night.

On 4/8/2020 7:55 AM, john acord wrote:
Here's the one I put in our boat.  Keeps Claire's IPAD Mini and Iphone both charged while in use.
https://www.amazon.com/YonHan-Charger-Socket-Motorcycle-Vehicles/dp/B077F4ZGTZ
It's 2.4A per USB socket.  Seems like you can find them with higher output if you look a bit.  3A seems maybe the usual limit.  If you want more than that than wire in a 12V to 5V dc-dc converter  and make your own :)
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John <@Jkohnen>
He used statistics as a drunken man uses lampposts; for support rather than illumination. (Andrew Lang)
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Health Update - Kay Patteson

David Graybeal
 

Most know that Pat passed a while back. His massive heart attack weakened him enough that he never really got back to 'normal'. 

So we were planning a memorial service for him. Maybe in July, in lieu of the Hagg Lake event. Maybe even sooner, if Kay could manage it.

But now Kay has had her own health crisis. What she thought was a bit of weight gain, and an increase in her COPD was, instead, a tumor. A large cancer. She's now had the surgery to remove it, and that went well. And this week, she had her first dose of chemotherapy. That also went well, as she's not feeling bad at all. She'll be doing another 5 doses, with the last in mid-July. Then recovery, and hopefully we'll see her at a Messabout later in the summer. 

If you have her #, I'm sure she'd enjoy a call.


Re: Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

johnacord
 

Here's the one I put in our boat.  Keeps Claire's IPAD Mini and Iphone both charged while in use.

https://www.amazon.com/YonHan-Charger-Socket-Motorcycle-Vehicles/dp/B077F4ZGTZ

It's 2.4A per USB socket.  Seems like you can find them with higher output if you look a bit.  3A seems maybe the usual limit.  If you want more than that than wire in a 12V to 5V dc-dc converter  and make your own :)

John A


Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

Last steamboat in my part of the world - the sternwheeler  Bessie which operated on the Rio Grande from Bownsville, Texas to Roma, Texas   last trip in 1902 or 1906 depending on what authority you read.  Why Roma TX/  Because there was a rock ledge across the river and unless the river was in an unusual high stage a powered boat could not get above it.  On rare occasions a boat made it all the way to Laredo, TX...Then had to be lucky with "high water" to be able to get back down river.  The coming of the railroad tracks more or less paralleling the river put the steamboats out of business.
- Gerard Mittelstaedt
  McAllen, Texas - on the north side of the Rio Grande (on the other side called the Rio Bravo)


On Mon, Apr 6, 2020 at 4:02 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
For an oral history project Charley interviewed Jesse Ott, an old-timer
who skippered some of the last steamboats on the Coquille and Coos
Rivers, and later ran IC powered milk boats on the Coos River. Coos Bay
outboard motor collector Jerry Alvey, who the Coots visited a few times,
grew up at Alleghany, up the Coos, and rode Jesse Ott's milk boats, and
maybe even worked for him (I don't remember). It wasn't always milk that
was in those cans coming down the river, often some of them contained
something more spirited. <g>

Something I read recently said that Welcome (now behind the Coos Bay
Museum) was the last milk boat on the Coast, running until 1948, but I
think there were milk boats on other coastal rivers running later. I
recall hearing about the boats that delivered mail and took kids to
school on the Siuslaw River, as if that was still going on, in the late
fifties, or even early sixties. When did they put in the bridge to
Duncan Island? There may still be a mail boat on Tenmile Lakes, north of
Coos Bay, but it was an outboard runabout last time I read about it.

The retired Coos/Millicoma River milk boat Eagle, built in 1903, had a
steel beam bolted to her keel and went fishing. After retiring from
that, she sat in the "back lot" at the Charleston boatyard for years.
The Port was hoping someone would step up to save her, but nobody ever
did and they broke Eagle up and birned her several years ago. <sigh>
Eagle was in better condition than Welcome, now sitting with a broken
back behind the Coos Bay Historical Museum...

https://preview.tinyurl.com/r4bzejy

or

https://theworldlink.com/news/local/welcome-back-a-piece-of-coos-history/article_e098169e-2071-5751-a5fb-2bfbe87b6887.html

--
John <jkohnen@...>
What is more pleasant than a friendly little yacht, a long stretch of
smooth water, a gentle breeze, the stars? (Billy Atkin)



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Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

For an oral history project Charley interviewed Jesse Ott, an old-timer who skippered some of the last steamboats on the Coquille and Coos Rivers, and later ran IC powered milk boats on the Coos River. Coos Bay outboard motor collector Jerry Alvey, who the Coots visited a few times, grew up at Alleghany, up the Coos, and rode Jesse Ott's milk boats, and maybe even worked for him (I don't remember). It wasn't always milk that was in those cans coming down the river, often some of them contained something more spirited. <g>

Something I read recently said that Welcome (now behind the Coos Bay Museum) was the last milk boat on the Coast, running until 1948, but I think there were milk boats on other coastal rivers running later. I recall hearing about the boats that delivered mail and took kids to school on the Siuslaw River, as if that was still going on, in the late fifties, or even early sixties. When did they put in the bridge to Duncan Island? There may still be a mail boat on Tenmile Lakes, north of Coos Bay, but it was an outboard runabout last time I read about it.

The retired Coos/Millicoma River milk boat Eagle, built in 1903, had a steel beam bolted to her keel and went fishing. After retiring from that, she sat in the "back lot" at the Charleston boatyard for years. The Port was hoping someone would step up to save her, but nobody ever did and they broke Eagle up and birned her several years ago. <sigh> Eagle was in better condition than Welcome, now sitting with a broken back behind the Coos Bay Historical Museum...

https://preview.tinyurl.com/r4bzejy

or

https://theworldlink.com/news/local/welcome-back-a-piece-of-coos-history/article_e098169e-2071-5751-a5fb-2bfbe87b6887.html

--
John <@Jkohnen>
What is more pleasant than a friendly little yacht, a long stretch of smooth water, a gentle breeze, the stars? (Billy Atkin)



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Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

Skagit Chief and Skagit Belle. They were said to be the last working steam paddlewheelers around Puget Sound. But that ignores the W. T. Preston...

Skagit Chief was sold to be used as a floating restaurant in Portland, but sank under tow off Gray's Harbor in October 1956:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/rzgkezd

or

https://saltwaterpeoplehistoricalsociety.blogspot.com/p/a-new-sternwheel-steamboat-2nd-skagit.html

Skagit Belle worked until 1957, then became a floating restaurant in Seattle:

https://preview.tinyurl.com/v7a6he9

or

https://www.goskagit.com/news/local_news/woman-at-the-wheel-anna-grimison-was-first-female-president/article_660cc103-d350-5314-831b-cc1638265a58.html

On 4/5/2020 12:08 PM, I wrote:
...
IIRC, there were a couple of steam sternwheelers working on the Skagit River quite late. Into the '60s?
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John <@Jkohnen>
Television is changing the American child from an irresistible force to an immovable object. (Author unknown)
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Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

The steam, sternwheel tugboat Portland worked on the Willamette River into the 1980s:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_(1947_tugboat)

The Corps of Engineers snagboat W. T. Preston also worked into the 1980s, around the Salish Sea:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._T._Preston

Both are still with us. The Preston is high and dry in Anacortes, and Portland is afloat in steaming condition in Portland.

Those are exceptional cases. Other than Portland, the last remaining Willamette and Columbia River steamers were retired by the mid '50s. I can remember seeing a few tied up under the steel bridge in Portland while going through on trains when I was a sprout. Then there was only one, Jean, then she was gone too:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sternwheeler_Jean

I kinda have memories of seeing steam, paddle towboats working on the Columbia, but I would have been quite young, and those might not be real memories...

I think there was one steamboat that worked as an excursion boat on the upper Willamette (above the falls at Oregon City) well into the '50s. I'll have to see if I can find it...

Speaking of the falls at Oregon City... I was thinking about the bump in the road called Lancaster, that I drive through on my way to the Coot lunches in Albany. It used to be a wild and wooly wheat shipping port, until God got tired of the all the fun, er, sin, going on and sent down a flood to change the course of the river, in the 1860s, but I couldn't remember the year. So I looked it up and read about the great flood of 1862 (actually started in 1861. The Willamette River was running so high at Oregon City that the falls didn't look like falls and, "Flood waters were so high that at Oregon City at the flood's crest on December 5, the steamer St. Clair was able to run the falls, and steamers were able to visit points at some distance from the normal river channel."

So much destruction just to punish those sinners in Lancaster. God musta really been mad! <g>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancaster,_Oregon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steamboats_of_the_Willamette_River

IIRC, there were a couple of steam sternwheelers working on the Skagit River quite late. Into the '60s?

On 4/5/2020 11:34 AM, john a wrote:
John,
Do you know when the last Steamboats ran on the rivers around your part of the world?
Here is a Steamboat that I know was still operating up in British Columbia in 1950, as I rode on it! :-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyie_(sternwheeler)
I was with a school group visiting Argenta, B.C., at the north end of Kootney Lake.  They put the group of kids on the Moyie at Kaslo and we rode it up to Argenta stopping once at Johnson's landing to off load supplies and mail.
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John <@Jkohnen>
A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." (Douglas Adams)
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Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

Myles Twete
 

The last operating river steamboat in Pacific NW US arguably is the steamer Portland---built in 1947 and operated by the Port of Portland until 1981, it was the last steam-fueled sternwheeler towboat in operation.  She is operated today several times a year by the Oregon Maritime Museum including trips that take member/passengers on local river trips.

http://www.oregonmaritimemuseum.org/

 

https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2017/07/portlands_sternwheeler_a_boat.html

 

 

 

From: oregoncoots@groups.io [mailto:oregoncoots@groups.io] On Behalf Of johnacord
Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:35 AM
To: oregoncoots@groups.io
Subject: Re: [oregoncoots] More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

John,

Do you know when the last Steamboats ran on the rivers around your part of the world?

Here is a Steamboat that I know was still operating up in British Columbia in 1950, as I rode on it! :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyie_(sternwheeler)

I was with a school group visiting Argenta, B.C., at the north end of Kootney Lake.  They put the group of kids on the Moyie at Kaslo and we rode it up to Argenta stopping once at Johnson's landing to off load supplies and mail. 

John A


Re: More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

johnacord
 

John,

Do you know when the last Steamboats ran on the rivers around your part of the world?

Here is a Steamboat that I know was still operating up in British Columbia in 1950, as I rode on it! :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyie_(sternwheeler)

I was with a school group visiting Argenta, B.C., at the north end of Kootney Lake.  They put the group of kids on the Moyie at Kaslo and we rode it up to Argenta stopping once at Johnson's landing to off load supplies and mail. 

John A


More Steamboats -- Closer to Home

 

Poking around on Wikipedia looking at steamboats on Oregon rivers I stumbled upon this shot of Echo, up the Coquille way back when. Echo isn't anything unusual, but I like the photo because it shows the sort of work the small steamboats, and later gas and diesel powered "milk boats", on the coastal rivers did, hauling supplies up the river and farm products down, stopping anyplace they needed to, Just a nice picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File%3AEcho_%28steamboat%29.jpg

The small boats aboard Echo are interesting too. That's clearly a flat-bottom skiff on the hurricane deck behind the Texas (if we can use such grand terms on such a humble craft <g>), but with higher sides than the usual steamboat skiff. It's hard to tell for sure if the boat on the guard is the same sort of skiff, or even flat-bottomed, but the great flare in the sides of the transom hint at the twisted sides of a steamboat skiff. Hmmm... You can see a typical steamboat skiff (or "yawl boat" as Chapelle called them in ASSC) aboard the Willamette River steamboat Beaver (she went up to the Stikine River during the Klondike gold rush!):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File%3ABeaver_%28sternwheeler%29.jpeg

John McCallum swears that McKenzie River drift boats evolved from steamboat skiffs, whatever Roger Fletcher says. <g> I think he's probably right. He designed his own interpretation of a steamboat skiff, and I owned the prototype for a while (he's got it now):

https://flic.kr/p/r5Ljzc

https://flic.kr/p/rjVDcC

http://www.boat-links.com/images/McKenzieSkiff.gif

This photo taken at Scottsburg, on the Umpqua shows a variety of interesting boats that plied that river in the Old Days. The caption says the shot was taken circa 1900, but because of all the "gas boats" I'd guess it was taken a little bit later:

http://photos.salemhistory.net/cdm/singleitem/collection/max/id/2901

--
John <@Jkohnen>
A belief which leaves no place for doubt is not a belief; it is a superstition. (Jose Bergamin)



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Re: OpenCPN on Linux

johnacord
 

Good note Bob, thanks.

I found that the manual was not correct with respect to tides and currents, and there were some subtle differences in the installation, probably a difference with what is in the repository ppa or the current build.  The Harmonic files were installed in /usr/share instead of /usr/local/share.  Once the location was set correctly OpenCPN found them OK.  But I could not find any way to get the Tide/Current buttons displayed on the toolbar so could not see tides & currents.  I found that if I set ShowMenuBar in Settings User Interface then I could display tides and currents with checking the appropriate in Menu Bar View.  Alternatively you can show tides and currents from the Chart Panel Options.


John A


Re: OpenCPN on Linux

 

Thanks, John. That's useful info. You can be our point man for OpenCPN on Linux. <g>

I think I got rid of my little Linux "netbook" sfter I got the Samsung tablet...

BTW, a "netbook" or laptop computer works fine for navigation, but they use a lot of power compared to a tablet. No problem for those with a Big outboard, but if you've got an alternator that puts out maybe maybe 6 amps... Dan from Almostcanada found that out last year using a laptop in walkabout.

On 4/4/2020 10:41 AM, john a wrote:
Since there has been some interest in OpenCPN, here is how my installation on Linux went.
...
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Re: Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

 

On Bob Larkin's advice I got a Samsung 10.1" Galaxy tablet. That was three years ago and it's worked fine. I can't vouch for any of the other reputable brands, but I tried a cheapo Chinese tablet in the early stages of my electronic nav experimentation and wasn't happy with it. Spring for a good tablet; they aren't that expensive, when compared to a less versatile dedicated navigation unit. But you don't need the latest model tablet, so a used or "refurbished" one could save you some money. Indeed, my Samsung was "refurbished", and that saved me about $50 at the time.

Be sure to get a tablet with a built-in GPS. The alternatives are unsatisfactory, and most decent tablets come with a GPS anyway. I like the 10.1" display because it's easy to see without getting close, and big enough to do stuff on. I bought it thinking it's be a dedicated navigation device, but I like it so well that I use it all the time. <g> I can see that in a small, open boat a smaller tablet might have advantages.

I'm curious about what other people have done to set up a navigation tablet in their boats, particularly open boats. How do you power it? Shade the display? Protect it from the weather?

My situation is a motorboat with a (feeble) charging system. I have the GPS mounted on a small folding TV wall mount (from Harbor Freight) just inside the door to the cabin. I can close the companionway hatch most of the way, and the door all the way. protecting the tablet from the weather, and shading the display. I leave the tablet plugged into a 12 volt USB charger all the time when navigating, because using the GPS runs the battery down relatively quickly. Not all 12 volt USB chargers have enough oomph; a "regular" one will barely keep up with the draw when navigating. Chargers built for fast charging newer tablets aren't expensice, and have plenty of oomph. Here's the one I use:

https://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00VH84L5E/themotherofal-20

But I may look for one that can be wired in directly, rather than plugging into a cigar lighter socket...

On 4/4/2020 9:49 AM, john a wrote:
What tablet do you like?
Does it have an internal GPS (not phone or wifi requiring internet to use), or if an external GPS used then what type (usb/bluetooth/wireless)?
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Re: OpenCPN on Linux

Bob Larkin
 

Thanks for the report, John.

Make sure you have the HARMONIC and HARMONIC.IDX files that have the tide and current data.  The writeup
https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual:toolbar_buttons:tides_and_currents
is a good tutorial.

I have used OpenCPN under laptop Ubuntu for many years with much happiness.  I also have an AIS receiver hooked to the laptop and it also works well.

I loaded the non-pay and pay versions of OpenCPN for Android onto my phone.  The pay version is better, but, lets face it, the screen will always be too small for so much activity.  It works, but we need more.

Have fun,  Bob


Re: The Kohnen Scarfing Jig

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

Some years ago I made a "scarfing jig" by welding a few pieces of angle iron, making a frame, and bolting a router on to a heavy plywood carrier to move back & forth across the 4 ft  width of a piece of plywood.  It sort-of worked,but the 1/4 in plywood (yes the plain stuff not the high dollar stuff0 did not want to lie flat enough that there in lied the difficulty.  - - since I have sandwich secured  plywood sheets between layers of 2x stock and scarfed with a belt sander using a rather coarse sanding belt. 
  Then at glue-up doing the thin epoxy first for soak-in and epoxy thickened with corn starch or very fine wood flour for adhesive glue-up seems to work great.  use a couple of very small finishing nails to keep the scarf from squeezing apart as I clamp the whole scarfed area with 2x on each side - wax paper between the 2x and the plywood and some added thickness in the middle (remember I am scarfing whole 8ft x 4ft plywood sheets) to keep the clamping tension sufficient in the middle..  Yes, this is odd business, but what can one do when one wants plywood more than 8 ft long and has decent bending qualities.  It worked for me - may work for you.   - AND the work surface was indeed large to accommodate the length of the 2 pieces being scarfed.  - - Best of luck on your projects -
Gerard Mittelstaedt in McAllen, (deep south) Texas


On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 2:20 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Thanks for looking that up, Jove. I'll have to print that out and post
it in the shop so I can remember. <g>

So, Randy's Kohnen Scarfing Jig is clearly a "jig". Something that, say,
positions stock on a drill press table to bore evenly spaced holes is
clearly, a fixture. But what about the device Randy used to cut scarfs
on the table saw? It doesn't guide the tool, but it actively guides the
stock into the tool. The same conundrum applies to countless table saw
sleds and guides. Hmmm... How many angels can dance on the head of a
pin? When in doubt, I'll just call them "gizmos". <g>

On 4/1/2020 10:40 PM, Jove wrote:
> Ok..... I had to google it!
> “The most basic difference, is that a *jig* is a type of tool used to
> hold and support the workpiece but in addition to this, A *Jig
> also* controls the location or motion of tool. On the other hand, a
> *fixture* is a support or work holding device used to hold work in
> place. It never guide the tool.”
--
John <jkohnen@...>
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.
(Edith Sitwell)


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Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


OpenCPN on Linux

johnacord
 

Since there has been some interest in OpenCPN, here is how my installation on Linux went. 

Start here:
https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual
and go to
OpenCPN User Manual
Getting Started
OpenCPN Installation
Ubuntu PPA

If you have generic Ubuntu there is a graphical install.  I am using Linux Mint (Ubuntu derivative) so I have to use Terminal & command line.

Open a Terminal and enter the following commands:
sudo apt-get install software-properties-common
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:opencpn/opencpn
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install opencpn
Depending on your Linux installation you may have some extra steps compared to the above, probably to "fix" packages.

On Mint a menu group "Edcation" was created with a category OpenCPN.

From CPN menu 'Options', 'Charts', Add Directory where your chart files are located.  I am using NOAA BSB charts and once CPN knows where they are CPN finds them and ready to use.

When I first opened CPN it displayed the world map for the other side of the world so you would need to zoom out and find your area, then zoom in to see your chart areas.

The chart display quality is every bit as good as my $300 program 'Coastal Explorer', and the user interface seems to be also just as good.  Creating a route was just as same

Tides & Currents seems to be missing from the tool bar.  Next is to find out why!

More soon as I use it.

John A


Choosing an Android Tablet for Navionics

johnacord
 

What tablet do you like?

Does it have an internal GPS (not phone or wifi requiring internet to use), or if an external GPS used then what type (usb/bluetooth/wireless)? 

thanks,
John A


Re: [TSCA-Puget] [oregoncoots] Navionics for Dummies

 

The annual subscription for Navionics US & Canada for Android is $21.99. I believe it's $19.99 for the US alone. US dollar$. Downloaded charts remain usable after your subscription runs out, but any info you have to get over the Interweb stops working.

On April 3, 2020 7:31:09 PM PDT, John A wrote:
What is the annual subscription cost for charts, US & Canada?

After one year do the charts become unusable if you do not renew ?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
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Re: Navionics for Dummies

 

I should have mentioned that the Navionics I'm addressing is for Android and Apple mobile devices. Navionics for mobile devices requires a yearly subscription for charts, and for just a few dollars more than the US only charts you can get Canadian charts to boot. One thing to like about Navionics even if you don't like the vector charts. <g>

One of these days I'll put together some "for dummies" stuff on OpenCPN for PCs and Linux. I don't yet know a good way to get Canadian charts that'll work with that program.

On 4/3/2020 5:15 PM, John A wrote:
Hey John,
That's the kind of stuff we PC (linux & win) sort of folks find very informative.
How about adding something about getting Canadian charts?
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John <@Jkohnen>
Anyone can tell the truth, but only very few of us can make epigrams. (W. Somerset Maugham)
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