Date   

Re: Glad I Live on the Wet Side

Randy Torgerson
 

John,

Around the turn of the last century, my grandfather staked a claim in Montana for 160 acres on his way from North Dakota to Tacoma.  The land was supposed to have natural gas on it and has been under lease ever since.  The land has never been drilled and my dad and my uncles, all in their nineties, don't bother to split the check anymore since it as grown so small.  Three of my great uncles staked their claim on farmland near Ethridge, Montana and grew wheat.  When my family visited the farm in the mid 60's the farm did not fully support my great uncles; they all had full time jobs.  Many years ago one of my cousins who managed the entire operation and was looking for someone to take it over as she was retiring.  I don't know what happened with the farm but with only 480 acres it not a viable operation. 

Randy


Re: An Album

Josh
 

Thank you for sharing.


Nice Oughtred design for sale in Bend

Case Turner
 


Re: Glad I Live on the Wet Side

Richard Green
 

Happy for some mild temps and a bit of rain overnight and so far this morning!

Rich

On Jun 15, 2020, at 7:53 AM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

I was watching a TV show that made me think of the "Whoop-up Trail" from Ft. Benton in Montana north to a trading fort in what's now Alberta in the late 1800s. There was prohibition in Montana, at least for Indians, and no law in that part of Canada... The Whoop-up Trail ran right by, or even through, where the town my Dad grew up sprang up -- Shelby, Montana -- so while looking up the trail I also looked at the Wikipedia page for Shelby. This is what a contributor had to say about the climate:

"Shelby has four distinct seasons, and is considered an arid climate. Long, severe winters give way to springlike weather anywhere from March to May. Summers can be extremely dry and hot, though it is not unusual to experience a snow flurry in July. The area is prone to heat, lightning, hail, and severe thunderstorms during the summer months. Fall weather is often unpredictable, with snow falling during October some years, and temperatures well into the 80s stretching until the end of November on other years. Due to the city's location just off of the Rocky Mountain Front, wind is a constant."

Sounds like someone who lived there. ;o)

Looks like a cousin of mine still publishes the newspaper there. I'm not quite sure how the Kavanaughs are related to me. They've run the Promoter for generations.

http://www.cutbankpioneerpress.com/site/about.html

My sister an I still get a royalty check every year from our share of the natural gas that was found under the old farm. About $7. <g>

--
John <@Jkohnen>
If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear. (Eric Blair)


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Glad I Live on the Wet Side

 

I was watching a TV show that made me think of the "Whoop-up Trail" from Ft. Benton in Montana north to a trading fort in what's now Alberta in the late 1800s. There was prohibition in Montana, at least for Indians, and no law in that part of Canada... The Whoop-up Trail ran right by, or even through, where the town my Dad grew up sprang up -- Shelby, Montana -- so while looking up the trail I also looked at the Wikipedia page for Shelby. This is what a contributor had to say about the climate:

"Shelby has four distinct seasons, and is considered an arid climate. Long, severe winters give way to springlike weather anywhere from March to May. Summers can be extremely dry and hot, though it is not unusual to experience a snow flurry in July. The area is prone to heat, lightning, hail, and severe thunderstorms during the summer months. Fall weather is often unpredictable, with snow falling during October some years, and temperatures well into the 80s stretching until the end of November on other years. Due to the city's location just off of the Rocky Mountain Front, wind is a constant."

Sounds like someone who lived there. ;o)

Looks like a cousin of mine still publishes the newspaper there. I'm not quite sure how the Kavanaughs are related to me. They've run the Promoter for generations.

http://www.cutbankpioneerpress.com/site/about.html

My sister an I still get a royalty check every year from our share of the natural gas that was found under the old farm. About $7. <g>

--
John <@Jkohnen>
If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear. (Eric Blair)


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Latest update on underwater spotting of "stuff"

Electri-Cal
 

So far one unit looks to be a winner, after water testing.  The other is almost useless, no cookbook to match stuff, "Manual" is one page, one side ion Chinese, the other warnings against hooking up wrong, and discleimers about no warranty.  Gosh. that makes it way clea, two lookers with test equipt. --. no screen goes on.  My own other "fish finder" is also a no-go for tech. reasons -- nwill not do more than designed areas. 

HOWEVER -- YES !!  At Paulina this Friday while hiking, I met a guy who had used a similar device a friend had concocted.  He said in several trips it showed way more fish in real time, full size, and in color.  He loved it, and chased fish all over the lake. found lost bottom stuff, and it was a total success.  That is exactly the  program I'm doing now.  Sure happy to find others who have done that for under $100. finished price, and work to mount.

 Not all equipment works, his was older, and too basic to do what I want, and be able to take photos of fish at the same time. Best bring a grappling hook too !!   More updates when I can get real water time.   That's it for now, will try to get mine done and tested soonest, as it needs to be done right - leaks wise!!  Next week is install for our new roof, so hopefully can do install on this also.  Here's for trying to get ready for all thiis stuff over a couple weeks while it's nice outside. 

Later Coots,   Cal


Re: The Rolling, Lurching, Vomit-Inducing Road to a Seasickness Cure

Richard Green
 

In the summer of 1980 I was sailing with a friend in Hawaii. We were going to bring his boat back to the PacNW. We did an overnight passage from Oahu to Kauai which didn’t bother me despite the roughness of the sea. But when we took off north from Hanalei Bay it was into 10+’ swells hard on the nose. I was seasick for three days though getting better after the first two. As they say about mal de mer, it isn’t that you think you’ll die, it is that you’re afraid you won’t.

However, I got my sea legs and it was shown to the point about two weeks or so later when we had a day of gale with fifty mph winds largely on the stern, large waves confused from different directions breaking over the sides of the boat, tearing the lee cloths off, thumping on the deck……and I was down below happily cooking lunch giving nary a thought to the motion save to occasionally having to hang on.

Rich

On Jun 13, 2020, at 8:40 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

An article in Hakai magazine (which published lotsa interesting stuff):

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yb837bf9

or

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/features/the-rolling-lurching-vomit-inducing-road-to-a-seasickness-cure/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it. (Upton Sinclair)


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The Rolling, Lurching, Vomit-Inducing Road to a Seasickness Cure

 

An article in Hakai magazine (which published lotsa interesting stuff):

https://preview.tinyurl.com/yb837bf9

or

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/features/the-rolling-lurching-vomit-inducing-road-to-a-seasickness-cure/

--
John <@Jkohnen>
It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it. (Upton Sinclair)


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Evinrude is Dead -- once again

 

"In a stunning and swift fashion, Bombardier Recreational Products, the Canadian owner of Evinrude Outboard Motors, announced on May 27 that it would immediately discontinue the manufacturing of all Evinrude outboard motors." A victim of the Dread Virus, They say...

https://www.soundingsonline.com/news/evinrude-production-comes-to-an-end

But they must not have been doing very well before that, if all it took was a pandemic to drive a stake through their heart.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
The best way to give advice to your children is to find out what they want and then advise them to do it. (Harry S Truman)


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Re: kayak sail rig

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

Had a good look at the Bat wing, Rushton sail  The upper "yard" sits close to the mast
making the sail rig something like a Gunter rig.  This is good in that it keeps the spars
including the mast low.
- Gerard Mittelstaedt


On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 3:29 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Nylon is too stretchy for an upwind sail. Polytarp works good. Polysail
Dave has done a lot of experimentation with them and has got them
figured out. Search for "polytarp sail", "Polysail" and "Dave Grey" in
the Duckworks Magazine archive:

https://duckworksmagazine.com/

http://polysail.com/

More from COD:

http://thecheappages.com/oddsails.html

Jim Michalak's perennial article on "sail area math" a good one, and his
method of balancing the rig should work fine for a kayak:

http://www.jimsboats.com/1jan20.htm

Tyvek house wrap has also been used for sails. The main problem for
Coots, and other small boat sailors, is that they sell it in Big rolls
at Jerry's. You might be able to bum enough for several kayak sails from
a building site...

http://boat-links.com/Tyvek/

On 6/10/2020 11:54 PM, Jove wrote:
> Yes, not very cootish, and I was hoping to build it myself from scrap
> and a little sail cloth or that ripstop nylon they sell at Joanne’s in
> nice colors.
 > ...

--
John <jkohnen@...>
People who bite the hand that feeds them usually lick the boot that
kicks them. (Eric Hoffer)


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--
Gerard Mittelstaedt  -- mittel48@...
McAllen, Texas
USA


Re: kayak sail rig

 

Nylon is too stretchy for an upwind sail. Polytarp works good. Polysail Dave has done a lot of experimentation with them and has got them figured out. Search for "polytarp sail", "Polysail" and "Dave Grey" in the Duckworks Magazine archive:

https://duckworksmagazine.com/

http://polysail.com/

More from COD:

http://thecheappages.com/oddsails.html

Jim Michalak's perennial article on "sail area math" a good one, and his method of balancing the rig should work fine for a kayak:

http://www.jimsboats.com/1jan20.htm

Tyvek house wrap has also been used for sails. The main problem for Coots, and other small boat sailors, is that they sell it in Big rolls at Jerry's. You might be able to bum enough for several kayak sails from a building site...

http://boat-links.com/Tyvek/

On 6/10/2020 11:54 PM, Jove wrote:
Yes, not very cootish, and I was hoping to build it myself from scrap and a little sail cloth or that ripstop nylon they sell at Joanne’s in nice colors.
...
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John <@Jkohnen>
People who bite the hand that feeds them usually lick the boot that kicks them. (Eric Hoffer)
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Re: kayak sail rig

Brandon
 

The seller (owner?) isn't very diligent in renewing his Craig's List adds; they come and go.

Brandon 


Re: kayak sail rig

 

I like balanced lugsails, but for a kayak you oughta look at some of the rigs used by canoe sailors long ago, but reduced in size. I'm thinking particularly about the batwing. It uses a short mast that you can probably leave up without hindering your paddling. When you drop the sail it all comes down aft of the mast, where you can more easily deal with it. Looks cool, too. <g> I don't mean what some modern canoe sailors call a "batwing", like Balogh's, but the original, like this:

http://www.thecheappages.com/canoe/rushton_bat/_Rushton_Bat_Sails.html

More interesting stuff from COD:

http://freepages.rootsweb.com/%7Efassitt/genealogy/canoe_mirror/canoe_sailing.html

I'd avoid any loose-footed (boomless) sail on a kayak, because it'd be prone to a "death roll" going downwind in a strong wind.

Did you ever finish the skin on frame kayak, Jove?

On 6/10/2020 11:54 PM, Jove wrote:
Yes, not very cootish, and I was hoping to build it myself from scrap and a little sail cloth or that ripstop nylon they sell at Joanne’s in nice colors. But the attachment methods and the recommended sail area are helpful. After reading some good things about balanced lug rigs going to windward ok I’m leaning in that direction. Short spars, simple to build and a low center of effort.
https://www.clcboats.com/life-of-boats-blog/lug-nuts-lug-rigs.html
--
John <@Jkohnen>
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat. (Craig O'Donnell)
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Re: kayak sail rig

Brandon
 

No. Not me. We are still happily living aboard Oceanus. The Columbia 43 that is for sale in Olympia is across the way in West Bay Marina. I've seen it from the outside and it looks to be in pretty good shape. Buy it for $20,000 and put another $60,000 into it and you would have a fine cruising boat. Columbia 43s rate pretty well under PHRF so you could race her as well. I wrote a review of the 43 in the May/June 2019 issue of Good Old Boar Magazine. She is a great sea boat, loves those big waves on the Oregon coast.

Brandon
SV Oceanus, 1971 Columbia 43
Olympia, Wash.


Re: kayak sail rig

Jove Lachman-Curl
 

Yes, not very cootish, and I was hoping to build it myself from scrap and a little sail cloth or that ripstop nylon they sell at Joanne’s in nice colors. But the attachment methods and the recommended sail area are helpful. After reading some good things about balanced lug rigs going to windward ok I’m leaning in that direction. Short spars, simple to build and a low center of effort.

On Jun 10, 2020, at 7:55 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

Where's the fun in buying a rig off the shelf? Not very Cootish. ;o) Those rigs look well-thought out, though their "Genoa" looks like a normal jib to me <g>, but $760-800!

https://www.kayaksailor.com/store/pc/viewcategories.asp?idcategory=2


On 6/9/2020 7:13 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Kayaksailor.com
Collapsible rig. Easily handled.


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John <jkohnen@...>
Never lose a chance of saying a kind word. (William Makepeace Thackeray)


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Re: kayak sail rig

Richard Green
 

Well, I see the ad is no longer existant so mebbe not.

Rich

On Jun 10, 2020, at 7:58 PM, John Kohnen <@Jkohnen> wrote:

Say it ain't so, Brandon!

http://hagothlog.blogspot.com/

On 6/10/2020 1:48 PM, Rich G wrote:
Brandon, is that your Columbia I see for sale?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
You can tell the size of a man by the size of the thing that makes him mad. (Adlai Stevenson)


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Re: kayak sail rig

 

Say it ain't so, Brandon!

http://hagothlog.blogspot.com/

On 6/10/2020 1:48 PM, Rich G wrote:
Brandon, is that your Columbia I see for sale?
--
John <@Jkohnen>
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Re: kayak sail rig

 

Where's the fun in buying a rig off the shelf? Not very Cootish. ;o) Those rigs look well-thought out, though their "Genoa" looks like a normal jib to me <g>, but $760-800!

https://www.kayaksailor.com/store/pc/viewcategories.asp?idcategory=2

On 6/9/2020 7:13 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Kayaksailor.com
Collapsible rig. Easily handled.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
Never lose a chance of saying a kind word. (William Makepeace Thackeray)
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Re: kayak sail rig

Richard Green
 

Brandon, is that your Columbia I see for sale?

Rich

On Jun 10, 2020, at 8:52 AM, Brandon via groups.io <brandonfordus=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

How about a golf umbrella. Classy and simple.

Brandon
Olympia, Wash.
1971 Columbia 43



Re: kayak sail rig

Brandon
 

How about a golf umbrella. Classy and simple.

Brandon
Olympia, Wash.
1971 Columbia 43