Date   

Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Mug and Boats

 

Pat-

Yep, that's you, big as life. How will we ever recognize you without that
neckbrace? <g>

The plans for the Rapid Robert are kinda sparse, but there's enough there
to build a boat. Except, that is, for the image with the middle frames, you
managed to cut off the tops of a couple of them. Maybe I should renew my
acquaintance with Tom Kaarhus's grandaughter Maurya, she's living in Tom's
former house now, and Roger Fletcher (the guy who does the driftboat
models) said she stumbles upon interesting boat stuff there now and then.
An old girlfriend of mine and Maurya used to be room-mates years ago. Tom
was gone by then, but Maurya's dad would talk sometimes about building
boats in the old shop by Williams Bakery.

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 17:16:16 -0000, Pat wrote:
John
You got a picture of me and my wife Kay in your picture.
Bryn Thoms' Don Hill "Standard" driftboat. That's me
right over the transom. "The guy in the neckbrace."
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two conditions:
1. He is a Greek
2. He is a Fisherman <Roy Blount Jr.>


Re: Boat ideas

chnookie
 

--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Chris-

Congratulations! But do you think you'll still have time to build a
boat?
;O)

Thanks! Hopefuly I will be done before the birth. Made some
significant progress last night. I think I have about a weeks worth
of work left, which I will manage to stretch to four, and be done
just in time. :)


Re: Mug and Boats

antec007
 

Yep that's me without brace. I took it off for the
Pic. I still Get to wear it for another couple of
months, but can take it off if I am careful.
I had a full beard that I had had for almost 30 years
befor the surgery. Had to go so they could see where to cut.
My Son had never seen my face.

Plans: Like it says, "What I found in the library."
That was it. A really poor photo copy with parts missing,
kind of stuffed in the boat building section. don't even
think the library knew it was there.
Glad it was though. I build a boat from it.
There is also a one page written instuctions, but it was
too poor to scan, so I will add it when Kay can retype it
and saw it in a text format.

How bout that "Fishing Machine" She's good. I just rows the
boat, and she catches the fish.

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon

--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Pat-

Yep, that's you, big as life. How will we ever recognize you
without that
neckbrace? <g>

The plans for the Rapid Robert are kinda sparse, but there's enough
there
to build a boat. Except, that is, for the image with the middle
frames, you
managed to cut off the tops of a couple of them. Maybe I should
renew my
acquaintance with Tom Kaarhus's grandaughter Maurya, she's living
in Tom's
former house now, and Roger Fletcher (the guy who does the driftboat
models) said she stumbles upon interesting boat stuff there now and
then.
An old girlfriend of mine and Maurya used to be room-mates years
ago. Tom
was gone by then, but Maurya's dad would talk sometimes about
building
boats in the old shop by Williams Bakery.

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 17:16:16 -0000, Pat wrote:
John
You got a picture of me and my wife Kay in your picture.
Bryn Thoms' Don Hill "Standard" driftboat. That's me
right over the transom. "The guy in the neckbrace."
...
--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two
conditions:
1. He is a Greek
2. He is a Fisherman <Roy Blount Jr.>


Re: [MessaboutW] Rapid Robert Plans and Pics

 

Pat-

I went down to _my_ local library this afternoon and found what they had
for the Rapid Robert, it turned out to be ten pages of poor photocopies,
with no credit given to Tom Kaarhus. :o( The photocopies were better than
yours anyway, the tops of frames 3 & 4 weren't cut off. <g> They had the
plan in the reference section, so I had to copy it there, but the library
copy machine worked pretty well, better than I expected. I brought the
copies of the copies home, scanned them, cleaned them up, and put them
here:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/RapidRobert/

Now you don't have to force your wife to type those instructions; I used
one of the marvels of the computer age: OCR.

Notice that I've made a BoatPlans folder in the files section for sharing
study plans and what-not. We shouldn't use it for real, copyrighted plans,
at least by living designers (or ones with active heirs like the Atkinses
or Westy Farmer). I think the Rapid Robert is effectively in the public
domain.

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Missionaries, my Dear! Don't you realize that missionaries are the divinely
provided food for destitute cannibals? Whenever they are on the brink of
starvation, Heaven in its infinite mercy send them a nice plump missionary.
<Oscar Wilde>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Boat ideas

 

Chris-

I meant: will you have time to build your (real) boat between changing
diapers? <g>

On Thu, 16 Aug 2001 15:46:36 -0000, Chris wrote:

Thanks! Hopefuly I will be done before the birth. Made some
significant progress last night. I think I have about a weeks worth
of work left, which I will manage to stretch to four, and be done
just in time. :)
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading. <Logan Pearsall Smith>


Re: Rapid Robert Plans and Pics

antec007
 

John
Those are the same plans. I dumped mine.
Text is the same too. I do remember the other detail
drawings. Just like my boat. I know those plans work.
Thanks for the update. Those are better than the originals
I found in the library.

I made very few modifications, as everything seemed to be right.
I did make my rowing thwart adjustable (ala Ray Heater)using
galvanised water pipe and flanges. Also added another set of
oar lock sockets further aft for solo rowing. I would make the
thwart less deep for and aft when I build it again. The one in
there is the original fixed one, just cut off and modified.
Detail can be seen on
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/Pat%
20Patteson%27s%20Boats/Rapid%20Robert/Rapid%20Robert-03-c.JPG
I also added and anchor system (again from Ray) and a block
attached to the bottom between my feet for pulling the anchor.
Forged oar locks and three 8 1/2 foot ash oars. (again from Ray)
Alway have 3 oars in a drift boat. Break one, or lose one,
and you are literaly "Up a creek". My spare stores neatly against
the inside. Never had to use it, but I'm glad it's there.

One major modification is that I eliminated most of the frames.
(He did what?) Makes for a clean "Floor".
I built mine over particle board forms and use the thwart
supports to take the loads the frames would have.
3/8 sides and 1/2 bottom with glass outside, and the very heavy
curved (box beam) of the gunwal and inwal stiffen it up.
I have not had any problems, and it has been abused.
I did knock a hole in the side when I hit a large rock, but
really not a hole, just cracked the veneer on the inside.
A little glass patch and it was OK again. Didn't even notice
it for a couple of months while I was giving it one of it's
rare washings.
Much cleaner inside without the bottom frames.

How do those plans compare to the original Kaarhus boat.

And, anybody got a guess on the vintage of the Johnson 15 on there.

Thanks again John, and if I were to build another drift boat,
it would be a Rapid Robert. Can't wear this one out though.

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon


--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Pat-

I went down to _my_ local library this afternoon and found what
they had
for the Rapid Robert, it turned out to be ten pages of poor
photocopies,
with no credit given to Tom Kaarhus. :o( The photocopies were
better than
yours anyway, the tops of frames 3 & 4 weren't cut off. <g> They
had the
plan in the reference section, so I had to copy it there, but the
library
copy machine worked pretty well, better than I expected. I brought
the
copies of the copies home, scanned them, cleaned them up, and put
them
here:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/RapidRobert/

Now you don't have to force your wife to type those instructions; I
used
one of the marvels of the computer age: OCR.

Notice that I've made a BoatPlans folder in the files section for
sharing
study plans and what-not. We shouldn't use it for real, copyrighted
plans,
at least by living designers (or ones with active heirs like the
Atkinses
or Westy Farmer). I think the Rapid Robert is effectively in the
public
domain.

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Missionaries, my Dear! Don't you realize that missionaries are
the divinely
provided food for destitute cannibals? Whenever they are on the
brink of
starvation, Heaven in its infinite mercy send them a nice plump
missionary.
<Oscar Wilde>


Re: Boat ideas

chnookie
 

Oh, my mistake. Uh, probably not, for awhile anyway. Hopefully by
next summer I will be back to taking on projects. I have a lot of
home repair to do, etc., so we'll see. I would like to have
something to row around in next summer. May have to stick with the
ugly motorboat for awhile though.


Re: [MessaboutW] Rapid Robert Plans and Pics

 

Pat-

The boat looks good. I'm beginning to think that if I ever got a drift boat
a Rapid Robert would suit me better than the typical modern variety. I
wouldn't be using it in challenging whitewater, and the RR is more suited
for use on flat water with a motor. But then a drift boat isn't high on my
boat priority list right now...

Nice fish!

The plans we found in our local libraries may be by Tom Kaarhus himself,
the building instructions have sort of a proprietary ring to them, or they
might have been put together by his son. If I remember the story correctly,
Kaarhus wanted a boat for amateur construction for an article in Popular
Mechanics (or another mag of the same ilk), so he came up with the boat
that came to be known as the Rapid Robert. The name was a last minute
addition to the article, possibly at the behest of the editors, and Kaarhus
apparently never mentioned why he chose it. It would be interesting to
compare the RR plans we have to the original article. I have no idea what
the relationship is between RR and the boats Kaarhus was building in his
shop at the time, but I'm guessing the RR was probably just variation.

There have been articles in Small Boat Journal and Wooden Boat about the
history of McKenzie River boats, and Roger Fletcher has a very nice Web
page on Oregon driftboats:

http://www.riverstouch.com/double-ender.html

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 21:24:56 -0000, Pat wrote:
...
Also Pics of finished boat. The Molalla looks like it's
a little low. And My Mug, with Depoe Bay shirt.
...
Rapid Robert is a "Fishing Machine" espesially when
my wife Kay is aboard. She is a "Fishing Machine."
Steelhead caught on the Molalla River near Molalla, from
Rapid Robert.
...
How do those plans compare to the original Kaarhus boat.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal.
If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle...
they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for
them by gasoline. <Theodore Roosevelt>


Re: [MessaboutW] The Gray Lives!

 

Bryn-

I've got the original Int'l Marine edition of Old Marine Engines, is your
the newer one from Devereux Books? I wonder if there's any difference.
Grayson has written a two volume book about the history of marine engines
(of all sizes) that looks like a good read, too bad it's so expensive. :o(

http://www.devereuxbooks.com/html/marine_stationary_engines.html

An excellent book about the mechanics of old engines is Internal Fire by
Lyle Cummins (of the Diesel Cumminses), printed by Carnot Press, Lake
Oswego, 1976 (there should be a copy at the Eugene Library). It's a history
of the IC engine from 1673 to 1900 (Cummins figures the IC engine reached
maturity by then, further development has just been refinement!).
One-lungers like my Gray, and the Atlantics and Acadias that were built
until just a few years ago, are essentially 1890s technology, not even
refined, though the Gray's jump spark ignition is pretty modern for 1906
(when it was first built). BTW, it looks like Devereux Books has reissued
Internal Fire! And also some other books by Cummins, including a bio of his
dad, Clessie.

I got the plans for my shop into the city Tuesday, a very helpful lady
there walked me through the process of applying for a permit. I was
pleasantly surprised! The shop will have an open ceiling and I'll be able
to store long lengths of wood on the beams. <g> The pitch of the roof is
low though, so I won't be able to pile too much stuff up there. I'm
getting excited about having a warm, dry place to work in the winter, with
room to move around.

I should have a messbout when I first try the old launch in the water, just
so I'll have lots of hands to bail! <g>

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 22:22:15 -0700, Bryn wrote:
...
I finished reading the one-lunger book, "Old Marine Engines" by Stan
Grayson, It's a very interseting read, a bit long-winded when it comes to
specific histories of each company, and a bit thin on the actual mechanics
of the engine, but nonetheless, a very interesting treatise on the
one-lunger.
...
Don't we all wish we had more storage space.
Can you imagine a shop with all the wood and fasteners just waiting to be
used, no lines at Jerry's, no driving here and there. Ok so I dream.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Many a man has fallen in love with a girl in light so dim
he would not have chosen a suit by it. <Maurice Chevalier>


Re: The Gray Lives!

antec007
 

John,
I have no life.
I had a dream last night about you trying to start your Gray.
It was kind of a cross between starting an engine and trying
to set off cannon. Lots of sparks and fire. In the dream
you finally got it going.
I'm very ignorant about the history and workings of internal
combustion engines. That book sounds great. I'll have to see
if I can can find it in our system.
The Brooks show was my first exposure to those engines.
And what an exposure. I think I could have spent hours
watching just one of them, trying to figure out how they
do all the amazing things they do.
Very cool.
"Cummins figures the IC engine reached maturity by then, further
development has just been refinement!"
That was what I told one of my fellow oglers at the show.
All the basics are there, just been refinements.
Wish I could put that book in "My library" but at $50, might
have to stick with the public library version for a while.
Only other brush with old engines was an antique John Deere
crawler tractor I borrowed to clear an old burned out mobile
home on our propery. (Previous owner's mobile home. Burned right
after they moved, and the insurance ran out. Pretty exciting
night.)
About D-2 size. It had only flyweel start. The guy that owned
it was a log truck driver, and strong as an ox, but I was sore
for days ater having to start it. Starters are one of the
"Refinements" I appreciate.

I accidentally ran into Roger Fletcher in the parking lot of the
Molalla Sentry Market. He was taking his Brand New Double
Ender home from Ray's. I could tell right away it was a
"Ray's" boat. He can build beautiful boats and this one is
exceptionally beautiful. I waited for Roger to come out, and
we had a long talk about boats. I went home and started following
the links on his page, and I think it was through one of them
I found your big page. Small world.

My wife Kay is an expert bailer. We lost our drain plug in
our 20' Rienell cabin boat on Detroit, and when I looked back
there was a foot of water in the back of the cockpit. She
grabbed a 5 gallon bucket, and we did not sink, but it was
pretty much the end of the old Volvo.
(Wanta buy another boat cheap? Pics in background of
Rapid Robert shots.)

Boats !#%*!

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon




--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Bryn-

I've got the original Int'l Marine edition of Old Marine Engines,
is your
the newer one from Devereux Books? I wonder if there's any
difference.
Grayson has written a two volume book about the history of marine
engines
(of all sizes) that looks like a good read, too bad it's so
expensive. :o(

http://www.devereuxbooks.com/html/marine_stationary_engines.html

An excellent book about the mechanics of old engines is Internal
Fire by
Lyle Cummins (of the Diesel Cumminses), printed by Carnot Press,
Lake
Oswego, 1976 (there should be a copy at the Eugene Library). It's a
history
of the IC engine from 1673 to 1900 (Cummins figures the IC engine
reached
maturity by then, further development has just been refinement!).
One-lungers like my Gray, and the Atlantics and Acadias that were
built
until just a few years ago, are essentially 1890s technology, not
even
refined, though the Gray's jump spark ignition is pretty modern for
1906
(when it was first built). BTW, it looks like Devereux Books has
reissued
Internal Fire! And also some other books by Cummins, including a
bio of his
dad, Clessie.

I got the plans for my shop into the city Tuesday, a very helpful
lady
there walked me through the process of applying for a permit. I was
pleasantly surprised! The shop will have an open ceiling and I'll
be able
to store long lengths of wood on the beams. <g> The pitch of the
roof is
low though, so I won't be able to pile too much stuff up there. I'm
getting excited about having a warm, dry place to work in the
winter, with
room to move around.

I should have a messbout when I first try the old launch in the
water, just
so I'll have lots of hands to bail! <g>

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 22:22:15 -0700, Bryn wrote:
...
I finished reading the one-lunger book, "Old Marine Engines" by
Stan
Grayson, It's a very interseting read, a bit long-winded when it
comes to
specific histories of each company, and a bit thin on the actual
mechanics
of the engine, but nonetheless, a very interesting treatise on the
one-lunger.
...
Don't we all wish we had more storage space.
Can you imagine a shop with all the wood and fasteners just
waiting to be
used, no lines at Jerry's, no driving here and there. Ok so I
dream.

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Many a man has fallen in love with a girl in light so dim
he would not have chosen a suit by it. <Maurice Chevalier>


Re: Mug and Boats

Larry Barker <lgbarker@...>
 

Greetings from the sunny end of the state.
I've uploaded a picture of our Bolger Nymph with Son Greg & I taking it out
on it's maiden sail last year at Emigrant Lake. It and our battered,
free-from-a-neighbor aluminum canoe comprise our current fleet. We sold the
Cascade 29 when we left Portland 5 yrs ago. Have had the Nymph out only
once this year - not much water this summer so have been trying to keep the
property alive and haven't had the time to run to the mountains where the
lakes are still wet.

I'm on call this weekend so have to stay in town. But, with nothing else
planned, I'm heading out to the shop to work on my "$200 sailboat" - the
frames are cut and the sides panels are butted so think I'll do a little
gluing and screwing. As long as work doesn't call I should make some
progress. (Note to self: take off epoxy-coated gloves before answering
phone :)

Larry Barker
Talent, Oregon


Re: Clarification on Neighbor's Fire

antec007
 

It was a miracle.
The neighbor's mobile home fire started only about
half an hour after the wife and her younger sister
had been out to get the last of the contents of
trailer.
The insurance was to run out in just a couple of days.
The miracle was that many of the items reported as
being lost in the fire miraculously appeared in their
new home. Glory be.

The Rapid Robert is pictured on the site where the trailer
sat 20 odd years ago. We were able to add 4 1/2 acres
to our estate. (Boat Storage)

Pat



--- In MessaboutW@y..., pateson@c... wrote:
John,
I have no life.
I had a dream last night about you trying to start your Gray.
It was kind of a cross between starting an engine and trying
to set off cannon. Lots of sparks and fire. In the dream
you finally got it going.
I'm very ignorant about the history and workings of internal
combustion engines. That book sounds great. I'll have to see
if I can can find it in our system.
The Brooks show was my first exposure to those engines.
And what an exposure. I think I could have spent hours
watching just one of them, trying to figure out how they
do all the amazing things they do.
Very cool.
"Cummins figures the IC engine reached maturity by then, further
development has just been refinement!"
That was what I told one of my fellow oglers at the show.
All the basics are there, just been refinements.
Wish I could put that book in "My library" but at $50, might
have to stick with the public library version for a while.
Only other brush with old engines was an antique John Deere
crawler tractor I borrowed to clear an old burned out mobile
home on our propery. (Previous owner's mobile home. Burned right
after they moved, and the insurance ran out. Pretty exciting
night.)
About D-2 size. It had only flyweel start. The guy that owned
it was a log truck driver, and strong as an ox, but I was sore
for days ater having to start it. Starters are one of the
"Refinements" I appreciate.

I accidentally ran into Roger Fletcher in the parking lot of the
Molalla Sentry Market. He was taking his Brand New Double
Ender home from Ray's. I could tell right away it was a
"Ray's" boat. He can build beautiful boats and this one is
exceptionally beautiful. I waited for Roger to come out, and
we had a long talk about boats. I went home and started following
the links on his page, and I think it was through one of them
I found your big page. Small world.

My wife Kay is an expert bailer. We lost our drain plug in
our 20' Rienell cabin boat on Detroit, and when I looked back
there was a foot of water in the back of the cockpit. She
grabbed a 5 gallon bucket, and we did not sink, but it was
pretty much the end of the old Volvo.
(Wanta buy another boat cheap? Pics in background of
Rapid Robert shots.)

Boats !#%*!

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon




--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Bryn-

I've got the original Int'l Marine edition of Old Marine Engines,
is your
the newer one from Devereux Books? I wonder if there's any
difference.
Grayson has written a two volume book about the history of marine
engines
(of all sizes) that looks like a good read, too bad it's so
expensive. :o(

http://www.devereuxbooks.com/html/marine_stationary_engines.html

An excellent book about the mechanics of old engines is Internal
Fire by
Lyle Cummins (of the Diesel Cumminses), printed by Carnot Press,
Lake
Oswego, 1976 (there should be a copy at the Eugene Library). It's
a
history
of the IC engine from 1673 to 1900 (Cummins figures the IC engine
reached
maturity by then, further development has just been refinement!).
One-lungers like my Gray, and the Atlantics and Acadias that were
built
until just a few years ago, are essentially 1890s technology, not
even
refined, though the Gray's jump spark ignition is pretty modern
for
1906
(when it was first built). BTW, it looks like Devereux Books has
reissued
Internal Fire! And also some other books by Cummins, including a
bio of his
dad, Clessie.

I got the plans for my shop into the city Tuesday, a very helpful
lady
there walked me through the process of applying for a permit. I
was
pleasantly surprised! The shop will have an open ceiling and I'll
be able
to store long lengths of wood on the beams. <g> The pitch of the
roof is
low though, so I won't be able to pile too much stuff up there.
I'm
getting excited about having a warm, dry place to work in the
winter, with
room to move around.

I should have a messbout when I first try the old launch in the
water, just
so I'll have lots of hands to bail! <g>

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 22:22:15 -0700, Bryn wrote:
...
I finished reading the one-lunger book, "Old Marine Engines" by
Stan
Grayson, It's a very interseting read, a bit long-winded when
it
comes to
specific histories of each company, and a bit thin on the
actual
mechanics
of the engine, but nonetheless, a very interesting treatise on
the
one-lunger.
...
Don't we all wish we had more storage space.
Can you imagine a shop with all the wood and fasteners just
waiting to be
used, no lines at Jerry's, no driving here and there. Ok so I
dream.

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Many a man has fallen in love with a girl in light so
dim
he would not have chosen a suit by it. <Maurice
Chevalier>


Baby Tender photos

chnookie
 

Finally got some pictures back and got them scanned. The cradle is
further along than this, but it's the best I could do. I may have
uploaded them in the wrong place, sorry about that. Not much of
a "boat", but a heck of a project, and it LOOKS like a boat. Close
enough?


Re: Baby Tender photos

antec007
 

boat4.jpg Nice Hat (glad you're wearing a mask. I've been
a woodworker for many years and haven't and it shows.)

Very Nice Boat too.
That's about the size lapstrake I might be able to tackle.
Looks like it's turning out great. Gonna be done in time?
Pics of Baby in Tender will be great in a few years, when you
say "How did She/He fit in that?"

Good luck on both your projects.

Is this Kid Number One ?

We did One and quit. That was enought for us.
I've learned a lot with him. Gives life a whole new perspective.
Get to look through Kid's eyes again. Great

Have fun
Pat

--- In MessaboutW@y..., chnookie@h... wrote:
Finally got some pictures back and got them scanned. The cradle is
further along than this, but it's the best I could do. I may have
uploaded them in the wrong place, sorry about that. Not much of
a "boat", but a heck of a project, and it LOOKS like a boat. Close
enough?


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Baby Tender photos

 

Chris-

That's a pretty little thing! Should look real nice when you get it
finished. Let us know how the frame bending goes, Bryn and I will be doing
some of that ourselves one of these days for our motorboats.

Don't those dust masks work better when you wear them over your nose and
mouth?

On Mon, 20 Aug 2001 19:42:54 -0000, Pat wrote:
boat4.jpg Nice Hat (glad you're wearing a mask. I've been
a woodworker for many years and haven't and it shows.)
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The trouble with the school of experience
is that the graduates are too old to go to work. <Henry Ford>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Clarification on Neighbor's Fire

 

That's amazing! They sure were lucky! I'll bet they were so overcome by
their good fotune that they just plain forgot to reimburse the insurance
company when those belongings miraculously reappeared after the fire. The
Lorf works in mysterious ways...

On Sun, 19 Aug 2001 14:50:07 -0000, Pat wrote:

It was a miracle.
The neighbor's mobile home fire started only about
half an hour after the wife and her younger sister
had been out to get the last of the contents of
trailer.
The insurance was to run out in just a couple of days.
The miracle was that many of the items reported as
being lost in the fire miraculously appeared in their
new home. Glory be.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
When I think of the number of disagreeable people that I know have gone
to a better world, I am sure hell won't be so bad at all. <Mark Twain>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: The Gray Lives!

 

My Gray is pretty dull compared to some of the machinery at the Brooks
fest: no exposed valve gear (no valves!); no make and break ignition; no
hit or miss governor... Once it's running all it does is "phutt, phutt,
phutt!" with the big flywheel spinning. You can watch the timing gears go
around out in the open air (don't get your fingers caught in them!) and the
ignition timer jumps around a bit because of a worn commutator, buts it's
not the sort of performance that makes you just want to stare at it trying
to figure out how it works.

There were moments of excitement when I first tried starting it though. The
spark comes from a "buzz coil" like model Ts used. Instead of working
itself up to produce one (hopefully) mighty spark at the right moment like
a modern car coil, a buzz coil starts buzzing at the right moment and
produces a continuous stream of sparks until the timer tells it to stop. I
pulled the spark plug to see what kind of spark I could get, turned the
engine over 'til the coil started buzzing, and that plug started hissing
with an arc like a welding machine! Smoke began curling off the end of the
plug as bits of fouling burned off-- it was kinda scary! No problem with
spark, I almost always got a pop of some sort when I bounced the flywheel
back.

The steps when starting the engine cold are to open the priming cup, turn
the engine until the air stops blowing out of the cup; pour some gasoline
into the cup; turn the engine over a few times to suck the gas into the
cylinder (if you weren't all the way to top dead center when you started
some of the gas might blow back out of the cup, as it might also on the
second revolution-- keep a fire extinguisher handy!), you'll know it's all
in there when you hear the engine suck and blow air through the priming
cup; close the priming cup; set the spark advance and throttle levers where
you think they should be; turn on the ignition switch; grab the flywheel by
the rim and rock it slowly in the direction you want the engine to go until
you feel it start to come up against compression (so you have some free
play); take a strong grip on the flywheel (no handle) and pull it sharply
up against compression in the _opposite_ direction than you want the engine
to run; there'll be a "pop" and with luck the engine will spin over
compression in the direction you want it to go, "pop" again, and again, and
again... If not, repeat the above steps as necessary... It's definitely
going to take some practice to get the hang of the process.

Roger Fletcher seems like a nice fellow, I talked with him a bit at the
Depoe bay festival.

On Sat, 18 Aug 2001 15:36:52 -0000, Pat wrote:
John,
I have no life.
I had a dream last night about you trying to start your Gray.
It was kind of a cross between starting an engine and trying
to set off cannon. Lots of sparks and fire. In the dream
you finally got it going.
...
The Brooks show was my first exposure to those engines.
And what an exposure. I think I could have spent hours
watching just one of them, trying to figure out how they
do all the amazing things they do.
Very cool.
...
I accidentally ran into Roger Fletcher in the parking lot of the
Molalla Sentry Market.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music and cats.
<Albert Schweitzer>


Re: Baby Tender photos

chnookie
 

John, the frame bending is nearly all done, two tough ones to go.
My advice would be to steam until they get flexible, then put them
back in! I keep breaking them in my impatience. It might be
easier on a bigger boat with wider turns to make, but the wood
would be thicker too. Patience is the key I think, which is why I
have so much trouble! Oh, and making jigs really helps as well.
I made a couple out of plywood so I could clamp the frames to
the jig as they came out, this really reduced my breakage. I have
seen people use strapping (like the stuff they use to hold cargo
to pallets) on the back side of wood being bent on a jig. Used
mainly for steaming recurves into wooden bows, but it helps
keep the back of the wood from starting to separate and causing
a break. Just a little extra support. On a bigger project with
heavier wood, I would really think about doing that.


Re: Baby Tender photos

chnookie
 

Should be done in time. I'm really making progress now that I
have most of the frames in. I'd guess a week or so from now.
Plenty of time. If you are planning a lapstrake, my only advice
would be to NOT use Doug Fir unless you don't have tight
curves. A "normal" sized boat would probably be OK, but on
something small like this it sucks. The stuff is just to stiff to
bend the right way without breaking. Cedar would have been
much better (as the instructions indicated :) ). Oh well, who
actually reads instructions?

This would be kid number one, and I hope she DOES fit, at least
for a week or two!


Re: The Gray Lives!

antec007
 

No valves? No "Hit and Miss." Darn. That was cool.

That starting proceedure must have been fun 30 miles
offshore at night in a storm. (Fire?)
Sounds a lot like my "Dream".

That's when "Men were Men."

Pat

--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
My Gray is pretty dull compared to some of the machinery at the
Brooks
fest: no exposed valve gear (no valves!); no make and break
ignition; no
hit or miss governor... Once it's running all it does is "phutt,
phutt,
phutt!" with the big flywheel spinning. You can watch the timing
gears go
around out in the open air (don't get your fingers caught in them!)
and the
ignition timer jumps around a bit because of a worn commutator,
buts it's
not the sort of performance that makes you just want to stare at it
trying
to figure out how it works.

There were moments of excitement when I first tried starting it
though. The
spark comes from a "buzz coil" like model Ts used. Instead of
working
itself up to produce one (hopefully) mighty spark at the right
moment like
a modern car coil, a buzz coil starts buzzing at the right moment
and
produces a continuous stream of sparks until the timer tells it to
stop. I
pulled the spark plug to see what kind of spark I could get, turned
the
engine over 'til the coil started buzzing, and that plug started
hissing
with an arc like a welding machine! Smoke began curling off the end
of the
plug as bits of fouling burned off-- it was kinda scary! No problem
with
spark, I almost always got a pop of some sort when I bounced the
flywheel
back.

The steps when starting the engine cold are to open the priming
cup, turn
the engine until the air stops blowing out of the cup; pour some
gasoline
into the cup; turn the engine over a few times to suck the gas into
the
cylinder (if you weren't all the way to top dead center when you
started
some of the gas might blow back out of the cup, as it might also on
the
second revolution-- keep a fire extinguisher handy!), you'll know
it's all
in there when you hear the engine suck and blow air through the
priming
cup; close the priming cup; set the spark advance and throttle
levers where
you think they should be; turn on the ignition switch; grab the
flywheel by
the rim and rock it slowly in the direction you want the engine to
go until
you feel it start to come up against compression (so you have some
free
play); take a strong grip on the flywheel (no handle) and pull it
sharply
up against compression in the _opposite_ direction than you want
the engine
to run; there'll be a "pop" and with luck the engine will spin over
compression in the direction you want it to go, "pop" again, and
again, and
again... If not, repeat the above steps as necessary... It's
definitely
going to take some practice to get the hang of the process.

Roger Fletcher seems like a nice fellow, I talked with him a bit at
the
Depoe bay festival.

On Sat, 18 Aug 2001 15:36:52 -0000, Pat wrote:
John,
I have no life.
I had a dream last night about you trying to start your Gray.
It was kind of a cross between starting an engine and trying
to set off cannon. Lots of sparks and fire. In the dream
you finally got it going.
...
The Brooks show was my first exposure to those engines.
And what an exposure. I think I could have spent hours
watching just one of them, trying to figure out how they
do all the amazing things they do.
Very cool.
...
I accidentally ran into Roger Fletcher in the parking lot of the
Molalla Sentry Market.
...
--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
There are two means of refuge from the misery of life - music
and cats.
<Albert Schweitzer>