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Re: [MessaboutW] Boat ideas

 

So many boats to build, so little time! <g> Dick Mitsch's Orca is a
modified Yankee Tender, he could probably tell you something about how they
go together. My advice is to try something small and simple for your first
boat, just to see if you like building boats.

My next building project should be something smaller and lighter than
Pickle for getting into places where there isn't a launch ramp, something I
can either carry on a roof rack or a very light, hand trundlable trailer.
I've pretty well decided on the 11' 6" skiff in Edwin Monk Senior's How to
Build Wooden Boats (a real bargain at $7.95 from Dover!). Ken Swan modified
the design a bit to make his Chico, filling it out a bit forward and
increasing the freeboard, but I kinda like the original better. I'll use
plywood planking and do everything I can think of to keep the weight down.
BTW, if you like skiffs get Ken Swan's catalog, he's got a really good eye
for the type.

http://www.swanboatdesign.com/

The skiffs can be seen:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MonkSkiff.gif

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/SwanChico.gif

I got the plans for shop I'm putting in my back yard the other day, now all
I have to do is fight with the city for a permit. With luck it'll be ready
before the rains fall, or at least have a roof...

On Wed, 08 Aug 2001 15:17:46 -0000, Chris wrote:
I have a huge list of boats I would like to try. They include: drift
boat, drift pram, dories of all shapes and sizes (I like dories),
yankee tender, some kind of whitehall or wherry, and just about any
other boat with nice lines that has plans advertised in the back of
WB. I am just finishing up a Jordan Baby Tender, which is lapstrake
and has given me some testing, so I'm not in a real big hurry to do
another lapstrake just yet. Most likely candidates are the drift
pram or something like the Gloucester Light Dory. Dunno for sure.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.
<Mark Twain>


Pat's Elegant Punt

 

Pat-

Nice picture of the punt, but where's the builder? <g> How did your Elegant
Punt sail? I always thought the design looked overcanvased with the
standard Bolger/Payson rig. I never finished mine, I used too cheap of
materials and got discouraged when I got the the finishing stage-- fill and
sand, fill and sand, fill and sand some more... :o( It sat around here for
a few years and then I gave it to the Sea Scouts, don't know what they did
with it. Next time I'm using decent plywood! <g>

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Self respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is suspicious.
<H. L. Mencken>


Mug and Boats

 

Following Pat's suggestion I've uploaded some pictures of me and my boats
(where's _your_ mug Pat?). My fleets to big (Sorry Fats <g>) so I made a
directory off the MembersBoats directory to hold the pictures:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/JohnK/

I'm a lifelong Eugenean, 50 years old, who's been a broke mechanic most of
my life. I finally got out of that racket, and am now a mostly retired book
keeper. I've loved boats all my life, but only recently came out of the
closet and started seriously fooling with them. I got rid of the dead cars
that were cluttering up my yard and have begun replacing them with boats.
<g> My fleet so far consists of Pickle, a Warren Jordan designed Footloose
skiff; Sandra Lee, a '62 aluminum Crestliner outboard motorboat and an old
lapstrake motorlaunch with a 1911 Gray 2-stroke engine in it. I've built an
elegant Punt (mostly) and a Six-Hour Canoe, and hope to build a few more
boats in the future.

In some photos Dick Mitsch gave me last week I found this picture of him
and Orca, which I've put into the MembersBoats directory without his
permission. I don't think he has a scanner so this might be your only
chance to see him, unless you come to a messabout. <g>:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/Orca.jpg

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be
pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying virtues.
<Elizabeth Taylor>


Re: Pat's Elegant Punt

antec007
 

It sails about as well as you would expect.
Bolger says it sails better than you would expect.
Especially in light winds and and smooth water. I would
agree with that.
With a theoretical hull speed of just under 4 knot,
it doesn't take much to push it to that speed.
After reaching hull speed it begins to make a
huge bow wave, into which the boat sinks.
I have sailed it in about 20knot winds and have tried to
bear off "Hobie style," on a screaming reach, but had to
ease off for fear of being swamped by the wave.
I've sailed her with a "Bone in her teath" and it gets
a little scary until you realize that your still only
going 4 knots.
It will not plane, regardless of how much HP you have.
Light, it will skip across the water, but so will a rock.
We usually use it to haul gear for our camping trips.
It spends much of it's time being "Toad". Hence the name.
Behind our Hobie or Rapid Robert.
It will haul an amazing amount of stuff. I have never been
able to put too much weight in it. I always run out of room
befor I sink it. I usually have it loaded 4-5 feet high.
Just have to put heavy stuff on the bottom. (Large propane
tank, drinking water, tents, ice chests.) Sleeping bags
are usually above shear height, and lawn chairs where they
will fit, on top. Then the whole thing is covered with a large
blue tarp to keep everthing dry.
Then we try to pull it into deeper water. We sometimes have
to unload some stuff because it is too heavy to move.
Once in deep enough water to float we check trim, and again
rearange things. Once trimmed, it's off across the lake at
that predetermined 4-5 knots. It will Not go faster. Just
makes a bigger hole, especially with 5-600 pouonds of gear.
I've often toad it behind the Hobie 16, loaded, and I am able
to "Fly a hull" while pulling it. Still at 4-5 knots.
We have some very dramatic pics of Chad or me high off the
water, "Flying". "Dramatic" until you notice the painter
tied to the Hobie, leading back to the "Toad", 20 feet behind.
Cool pics though. I'll see if I can find them.

With the single leeboard (which Bolger says somewhere, works
equally bad on either tack), and rudder being only about
4 feet apart, the helm is quite sensitive and powerful
(until the rudder stalls), which is probably good,
as it has almost no inherant directional stability,
and will round up in a blink (or faster).

Light breeze. Smooth water.

It is much overcanvased but,the sail, rudder, and leeboard are
Boger's standard rig for many of his small sail boats.
I am plenty of sail downwind, but my shape does not
make for very good upwind performance.
I would not go to the expense, or touble to build them
again if I were building only a "Toad", but if you intend
to build several of his boats, they fit them all.
The sialing gear weighs almost as much as the boat.

The "Toad" is not a good sailer, but then it has None
of the properties that would make it one.

It is still our favorite boat. Fun, light (no "Ramp" required),
carries a great load (two adults, or all your camping gear), rows
easily, relatively "seaworthy" (if you pick your sea),
fits in the back of a pickup, or on top of a Subaru,
cheap to build (two days building, two sheets of 1'4"laun ply,
and a few feet of lumber, no "glass", house paint,
and PV pipe oars with 1/4" blades), and about
as cute as you can make an 8'x 3 1/2' box.
All properties I find most important in a boat.

A boat that will be used.

As with many of Bolger's boats, it is designed to Look easy
to build. The shape of the sides is cut, rather than
bent, making for some faily tight compound bends in
chine and sheer. I laminaed two thin pieces for the
chine, and have a light molded piece for the gunwale.
It is rabbeted the leangth so that it covers the edge of
the 1/4" ply sides as well as the sides. Rabbeting it
also make it flexable enough to take the bend without steaming.
The rest is quite simple with outside chines and frames.
No great worry of decreased speed, but makes for good
protection from rocks.

I have two friends that wanted to build themselve boats.
I gave them the book, and they came up with two more
"Elegant Punts". Neither had ever built a boat, but one
is a master cabinetmaker, so I guess that's really not
an example of a "First time builder."
Both had sailed my boat, and niether of them liked the leeboard,
and insisted, against my warnings, on putting in dagger boards.
They both leaked, and continued to leak for the lives of the
boats, which was not long, as both left their boats out
in the weather, and both are now piles of delalminated luan.

"Don't put holes in boats."

Mine is over twenty years old and still in great shape,
resting under my shop when not needed.

I'll try to find a pic with me in a boat, but like you,
I have been on the other end of the camera.

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon

jes, i'm longwinded




--- In MessaboutW@e..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Pat-

Nice picture of the punt, but where's the builder? <g> How did your
Elegant
Punt sail? I always thought the design looked overcanvased with the
standard Bolger/Payson rig. I never finished mine, I used too cheap
of
materials and got discouraged when I got the the finishing stage--
fill and
sand, fill and sand, fill and sand some more... :o( It sat around
here for
a few years and then I gave it to the Sea Scouts, don't know what
they did
with it. Next time I'm using decent plywood! <g>

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Self respect: the secure feeling that no one, as yet, is
suspicious.
<H. L. Mencken>


Re: Boat ideas

antec007
 

If you've build a lapstrake, the dories should be a piece of cake.
I have never had the patience for a lapstrake.
All my boats have been pretty "Qick and dirty". If it takes
more than a couple of days to build it, I don't.

Drift boat. I promised to put "Plans", as such they are, for
the "Rapid Robert" I built. Another very nice, funcional boat,
if you don't mind a few strange looks, and a kind of strange
looking boat. See my post.
http://www.egroups.co.uk/message/MessaboutW/45
Might be a boat for you. Will also get you some admiring looks
from those who know boats.
You can build it like I did, or you can build it like Ray Heater does.
http://www.riverstouch.com/woodrow.html

I will put up plans and my "Mug".

Gloucester Light Dory Buy the book if you haven't already.
Good reading and lots of detailed "How toos".

Very nice rowing boat. (Don't row too hard, the extra knot
you get will make you work twice as hard. "Old Man" talking here.)
A little more complicated than standard dory, but great building
details in book. http://www.instantboats.com/
It is much smaller than the 16' lenght would lead you to belive.
A little tender when boarding, but quite stable, and seaworthy
when seated. Thwarts for two, but really a 1 person rowing boat.
Check the trim with you in the rowing position befor you place
the rowing thwart. I found that I need a little balast in the
bow to get proper trim. Ice chest works, and I have a 15# rubber
coated muchroom anchor hanging hanging from the bow for Shad
fishing on the Willamette. It hold me in most current.
(Our Son Chad was kind of named after that fish, and went fishing
with us when he was 1 1/2 Months old. In a basket in the middle
of another boat I "designed" and built, a 16' x 5 1/2'PC style dory.
Planed with 4 peopel and a baby with old 10 hp Merc.)

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon



--- In MessaboutW@e..., chnookie@h... wrote:
I have a huge list of boats I would like to try. They include:
drift
boat, drift pram, dories of all shapes and sizes (I like dories),
yankee tender, some kind of whitehall or wherry, and just about any
other boat with nice lines that has plans advertised in the back of
WB. I am just finishing up a Jordan Baby Tender, which is
lapstrake
and has given me some testing, so I'm not in a real big hurry to do
another lapstrake just yet. Most likely candidates are the drift
pram or something like the Gloucester Light Dory. Dunno for sure.


Re: [MessaboutW] Mug and Boats

thoms.bryn@...
 

That's Rich's Launch, I didn't know you (John) picked that thing up. My
lapstrake '60s Cruiser's Inc. runabout is from him. I'm surprised he isn't
on the list, well maybe he is, maybe we just don't hear from him. I was
eyeing the launch when I went to his house the first time to look over the
runabout. Did you ever the get the engine going? I was so hot on launches
and one-lungers awhile ago, that I almost bought that from him, I realized
that a free boat is bit easier to bring home that one you have to pay for.
However, your boat from Rich floats, mine is missing the garboards and
several other integral parts.

John - if you have a photo of me from the Depoe Bay fest, You're welcome too
put it in the messabout file for the mugs.

I was at Dorena this Sunday, put in on the north side and rowed the
driftboat out aways and had a great time swimming, it was very nice, not too
many PWCs or drunken water skiers, just enough to make some bouncy waves.
The kids loved it, it kinda felt like we were in the ocean, granted the wave
action isn't real good for the shoreline, but nonetheless, it was a good
time. I even got a very colorful compliment about my boat from a drunken
party barge pilot with the kids and grandma right next to me. I thought it
was quite funny, although I don't think my mother-in-law appreciated his
language. I could see they were connoisseurs of good taste, cut-off shorts
and Hams talls.

The list of boats I have built:
several fiberglass kayacks with the family when I was a pre-teen
the firecracker,a small rowing dory, when I was in my early twenties
the Don Hill driftboat, last year
current project, rebuild the runabout

I own a small river kayak, small cyclone 14 sailboat, and the gloucester
gull rowing dory.

I really want to build a simple skiff, Ed monk design or maybe Ken Swan, or
maybe a nondiscript thing from Gardner's small craft book, I'd like to turn
a 50' troller into a troller yacht, I'd like to build a Carolina Dory for
use in the estuaries, crabbing,.. Herreshof 12 1/2 would quite a project or
the trailerable Joel White version, that would be a a great daysailer for
the family. I recently dreamed of building the Prince Helfrich and Veltie
Pruit boat, early Rapid Robert, that those guys used in the upper Mckenzie
watershed. That's with spruce planks and all.

Enough, there is too many boats and not enough time.

-----Original Message-----
From: jhkohnen@... [mailto:jhkohnen@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2001 11:41 PM
To: MessaboutW@...
Subject: [MessaboutW] Mug and Boats


Following Pat's suggestion I've uploaded some pictures of me and my boats
(where's _your_ mug Pat?). My fleets to big (Sorry Fats <g>) so I made a
directory off the MembersBoats directory to hold the pictures:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/JohnK/

I'm a lifelong Eugenean, 50 years old, who's been a broke mechanic most of
my life. I finally got out of that racket, and am now a mostly retired book
keeper. I've loved boats all my life, but only recently came out of the
closet and started seriously fooling with them. I got rid of the dead cars
that were cluttering up my yard and have begun replacing them with boats.
<g> My fleet so far consists of Pickle, a Warren Jordan designed Footloose
skiff; Sandra Lee, a '62 aluminum Crestliner outboard motorboat and an old
lapstrake motorlaunch with a 1911 Gray 2-stroke engine in it. I've built an
elegant Punt (mostly) and a Six-Hour Canoe, and hope to build a few more
boats in the future.

In some photos Dick Mitsch gave me last week I found this picture of him
and Orca, which I've put into the MembersBoats directory without his
permission. I don't think he has a scanner so this might be your only
chance to see him, unless you come to a messabout. <g>:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/Orca.jpg

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be
pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying virtues.
<Elizabeth Taylor>



No flaming, cursing or public mopery. Please be polite.
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Re: [MessaboutW] Boat ideas

 

Chris-

I don't know what I was thinking last night, obviously you've already tried
something small, if not simple! <g> And apparently you liked the building
enough that you're hungry for another project! Sorry if I sounded
patronizing. Will you show us pictures of the cradle boat?

The back of Wooden Boat isn't the only place to find good boat plans. Have
you read any of John Gardner's books? They're full of good boats, with
building instructions for most (in some chapters he assumes you know how a
certain type of boat goes together, and if you've read his books you
should!). MoToR BoatinG magazine published several collections of plans,
with building instructions, from the '20s into the '60s, most from the
boards of Billy Atkin and his son John, but also from such luminaries as
John Hacker, George Crouch, William J. Deed and William F. Crosby. I've
been working on an index of the designs in the books, with a lot of help
from Doug Wilde, you can find a very incomplete version here:

http://www.boat-links.com/Ideal/XLI.html

A couple of Howard Chapelle's books, Boatbuilding and American Small
Sailing Craft contain lines and construction drawings and offsets for some
very nice traditional boats, but you have to know how a boat goes together
to build them (you can learn about that by reading Boatbuilding <g>). Pete
Culler designed some beautiful small boats, and you can read about and see
them in his books, though you'll have to buy the plans from Mystic Seaport.
Mystic Seaport also sells plans by other designers, and plans taken from
boats in their collection:

http://www.mysticseaport.org/public/collections/ships.plans/planprices.html

Look for the two volumes (the flat-bottom boat and the V-bottom boat) of
Simplified Boatbuilding by Harry V. Sucher for some good flat and V-bottom
designs. Make use of interlibrary loan unless you've got lots of space for
bookshelves! <g> There are so many plans for good boats available that it's
hard to make up one's mind what to build.

As you can see, I love to read books about boats and ogle plans, it's
almost as much fun as being out on the water. <g>

On Sun, 12 Aug 2001 22:48:38 -0700, I wrote:
...
My advice is to try something small and simple for your first
boat, just to see if you like building boats.
...
On Wed, 08 Aug 2001 15:17:46 -0000, Chris wrote:
...
I am just finishing up a Jordan Baby Tender, which is lapstrake
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
<Craig O'Donnell>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Pat's Elegant Punt

 

Pat-

The rig in the picture in the files section doesn't look like the standard
Bolger sail, did you eventually put together a bolger rig? I've got a
Teal/Surf/Elegant Punt/Gypsy/Brick/who-knows-what else sail in my closet
that I picked up real cheap afew years ago, I might try using it on the
Monk skiff just for the fun of it, though that means I'd have to put a hole
in the bottom of the boat...

Lauan is a lot easier to finish than el-cheapo fir plywood, but it's
awfully flimsy stuff. A friend of mine used it on a $200 Sailboat, which is
a pretty lightly constructed design, and it feels like it's barely strong
enough to hold the boat together. :o( I used lauan on the 6-Hour Canoe, but
now I've sworn it off and will use real marine ply on the little skiff,
it's only going to take three sheets anyway. The Elegant Punt has quite
some curves! I used one piece fir chines and gunwales and they were a real
b**** to wrestle into place and the grain was starting to lift on the
outside faces when I got them into position! For that matter, the grain
started to lift on the ouside of the AC fir ply sides too. <sigh> I've
decided that cheap materials just aren't worth the extra effort, especially
on small boats where you don't use very much anyway.

On Mon, 13 Aug 2001 17:12:53 -0000, Pat wrote:
It sails about as well as you would expect.
...
It is much overcanvased but,the sail, rudder, and leeboard are
Boger's standard rig for many of his small sail boats.
I am plenty of sail downwind, but my shape does not
make for very good upwind performance.
I would not go to the expense, or touble to build them
again if I were building only a "Toad", but if you intend
to build several of his boats, they fit them all.
The sialing gear weighs almost as much as the boat.
...
cheap to build (two days building, two sheets of 1'4"laun ply,
...
As with many of Bolger's boats, it is designed to Look easy
to build. The shape of the sides is cut, rather than
bent, making for some faily tight compound bends in
chine and sheer. I laminaed two thin pieces for the
chine, and have a light molded piece for the gunwale.
...
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Love is the delightful interval between meeting a beautiful girl and
discovering she looks like a haddock. <John Barrymore>


Re: Boat ideas

chnookie
 

John, don't worry, you didn't sound condescending or anything.
I will try to post some pictures when I get them. I don't have a
scanner at home, and the cradle is actually not finished yet. I
still have to put the frames and trim work in. Just got the planking
done. I have to hurry, I only have a month left before it needs to
be "launched". The construction was kind of a pain. Mostly because
I used Doug Fir planks instead of the recommended cedar. I had some
beautiful wood from my parents' wood lot, and just had to use it.
But it doesn't bend well enough for this kind of work, won't take a
tight enough curve. I got it done, but it looks a little fatter and
stouter than the pictures I have seen of "proper" versions. Oh well,
I like it the way it is just fine. Hoping to get through the
finishing with no mistakes I have to paint over, I would like to
finish it bright. So, when I get pictures I would be happy to post
them. Meantime, I could post what it is SUPPOSED to look like, or
give you the link, www.jordanwoodboats.com/bt.htm .


Re: Pat's Elegant Punt and other Ramblings

antec007
 

Yea, That is (I think) a twenty years ago early model
sailboard sail. It belonged to a friend of mine, and
was too cute not to put on the toad. Worked as well
as any I've tried.
I never got the "Official" Bolger small sailboat sail.
Maybe we can put yours on it, if we ever get together sometime,
and you can decide how a "Toad" sails. Do your streaching,
it's a little crouded in there.
The rudder is Bolger, and the Leeboard is to size, but
I modified it to be built of two outside layers of 1/4"
fir, and a vericle spar inside. All covered with glass.
Took as long to build as boat.
Kind of cool idea. I don't know if I have seen it anywhere,
so I guess I can sort of say I though of it. (Realy very
few "Original" ideas of anything anymore.)
Kind of like an airplane wing. Spar about 2/5 of the way
from the leading edge, so gives a NACA Airfoil (of some number)
shape to the board. Very important on a "Toad".
Idea would be great for dagger or center boards.
Very stong, and light weight, and hollow, so balast could
be poured in to put it down low where it should be.
1/2-" leading and trailing edges. Leading rounded, trailing
tapered.
"For a "Toad"?
I got a wild hair.

1'4 Luan
I can't get it any more. I have used it for years as the
backs for my cabinets, and then pick out the "Premo" sheets
to use for boat building. I went in one day to buy some,
and had to argue with the new guy there that they carried
it. Not 'till I talked to my salesman did I find out it has
been replaced at my supplier by another endangered
tropical species. I haven't tried it yet on a boat, but
doesn't seem to have all the nice qualities of luan.
I'm too cheap for marine, and Ray Heater says even the
"Marine" fir from Vanply isn't very good.
I'll just build with what I can get, and throw it away
in 25 years. I want to Wear Out a boat befor then.
"Toad" all 1/4 luan.
Rapid Robert was built with 3/8 Luan sides and 1/2 Luan
bottom. All glassed. 3 Layers of glass on bottom.
Hell for stout. Even solid luan for all solid wood.
I was thinking about naming it LouAnne, but "Rapid Robert"
is better.
My Bolger rowing dory is 1/4 luan sides and 3/8 fir bottom.
A little light, (I take that to be one of the good properties)
but curved bow gives and extra curve to plywood that seems
to stiffen it up.

Ken Swan boats
He lives about 20 miles from me, but I've never been over there.
Near Woodburn.
His boats don't look like much on paper, but ar very
Nice as real boat.
Haven't built one yet, but probaly will some time when I get
another "Wild Hair".
Want to get my GP-16/18 built when I am able.
If it is as nice as I think it is, You guys might not hear
from me again.

By the way, I don't know if everybody here reads the Bolger
posts. Kind of have to sift though the chaff sometimes,
but I saw one that really made me realize what this "Small
Boat Thing" is all about.
http://www.egroups.co.uk/message/bolger/13490

Enjoy

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon

--- In MessaboutW@e..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Pat-

The rig in the picture in the files section doesn't look like the
standard
Bolger sail, did you eventually put together a bolger rig? I've got
a
Teal/Surf/Elegant Punt/Gypsy/Brick/who-knows-what else sail in my
closet
that I picked up real cheap afew years ago, I might try using it on
the
Monk skiff just for the fun of it, though that means I'd have to
put a hole
in the bottom of the boat...

Lauan is a lot easier to finish than el-cheapo fir plywood, but it's
awfully flimsy stuff. A friend of mine used it on a $200 Sailboat,
which is
a pretty lightly constructed design, and it feels like it's barely
strong
enough to hold the boat together. :o( I used lauan on the 6-Hour
Canoe, but
now I've sworn it off and will use real marine ply on the little
skiff,
it's only going to take three sheets anyway. The Elegant Punt has
quite
some curves! I used one piece fir chines and gunwales and they were
a real
b**** to wrestle into place and the grain was starting to lift on
the
outside faces when I got them into position! For that matter, the
grain
started to lift on the ouside of the AC fir ply sides too. <sigh>
I've
decided that cheap materials just aren't worth the extra effort,
especially
on small boats where you don't use very much anyway.

On Mon, 13 Aug 2001 17:12:53 -0000, Pat wrote:
It sails about as well as you would expect.
...
It is much overcanvased but,the sail, rudder, and leeboard are
Boger's standard rig for many of his small sail boats.
I am plenty of sail downwind, but my shape does not
make for very good upwind performance.
I would not go to the expense, or touble to build them
again if I were building only a "Toad", but if you intend
to build several of his boats, they fit them all.
The sialing gear weighs almost as much as the boat.
...
cheap to build (two days building, two sheets of 1'4"laun ply,
...
As with many of Bolger's boats, it is designed to Look easy
to build. The shape of the sides is cut, rather than
bent, making for some faily tight compound bends in
chine and sheer. I laminaed two thin pieces for the
chine, and have a light molded piece for the gunwale.
...
--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Love is the delightful interval between meeting a beautiful
girl and
discovering she looks like a haddock. <John Barrymore>


Re: [MessaboutW] Mug and Boats

 

Bryn-

I saw Rich's launch in the Register Guard at a price I couldn't resist, so
now it's mine. I haven't got the engine going yet, mostly becuase I've been
busy with other things, but possibly also because of an unconscious fear
that it'll blow up. <g> I've been fooling with it some the last few days
and will give it a try tomorrow or the next day. The boat is in better
shape than your Cruiser, but it's still a diamond in the rough, I'm not at
all sure that it'll float, even after it swells up. We'll see soon. I've
wanted one of those one-lungers for decades! I told Rich about this list,
but I don't know if he's lurking here. Are you here Rich?

Dorena gets its share of motorboating yahoos, but you should have been at
Cottage Grove reservoir last Sunday, they were really churning the lake up!
Fortunately most of them went home late in the afternoon and I managed to
get in some good sailing. The winds at Cottage Grove Lake don't seem quite
as fluky as at Dorena, probably because the hills surrounding the lake
aren't as big. It's a small lake, but I'll probably sail there again--
preferably on weekdays! Dorena can get some good waves just from the wind
if it's coming up the lake, but nothing as nasty as Fern Ridge.

John McCallum at Applegate Boat Works has adapted a steamboat yawl for
plywood stitch 'n' glue construction, he claims that's the kind of boats
that the early McKenzie rivermen used. Does this look anything like the
Helfrich/Pruitt boat, or was theirs a Kaarhus boat?

http://www.teleport.com/~boatshop/mckenzie.html

I picked up that book about Buzz Holmstrom, the gas pump jockey from
Coquille who ran the Green and Colorado alone in the '30s, from one of the
authors at the Portland Wooden Boat Show, an excellent read! I don't think
I'll ever be a whitewater boater, but I can understand what drove people
like Holmstrom and Helfrich and Pruitt. The book is called 'The Doing of
the Thing" by a committee of authors, despite which it reads well. A few
geographical and boatbuilding errors gave me pause, and should have been
caught by somebody, but they don't detract much from the book.

There's no reason to build a nondescript skiff when there are so many plans
for nice ones out there. <g>

I don't have a picture of you (Bryn), but I've got one of your drift boat
and Gloucester Gull.

On Mon, 13 Aug 2001 15:34:02 -0700, Bryn wrote:
That's Rich's Launch, I didn't know you (John) picked that thing up. My
lapstrake '60s Cruiser's Inc. runabout is from him. I'm surprised he isn't
on the list, well maybe he is, maybe we just don't hear from him. I was
eyeing the launch when I went to his house the first time to look over the
runabout. Did you ever the get the engine going? I was so hot on launches
and one-lungers awhile ago, that I almost bought that from him, I realized
that a free boat is bit easier to bring home that one you have to pay for.
However, your boat from Rich floats, mine is missing the garboards and
several other integral parts.

John - if you have a photo of me from the Depoe Bay fest, You're welcome too
put it in the messabout file for the mugs.

I was at Dorena this Sunday, put in on the north side and rowed the
driftboat out aways and had a great time swimming, it was very nice, not too
many PWCs or drunken water skiers, just enough to make some bouncy waves.
The kids loved it, it kinda felt like we were in the ocean, granted the wave
action isn't real good for the shoreline, but nonetheless, it was a good
time. I even got a very colorful compliment about my boat from a drunken
party barge pilot with the kids and grandma right next to me. I thought it
was quite funny, although I don't think my mother-in-law appreciated his
language. I could see they were connoisseurs of good taste, cut-off shorts
and Hams talls.
...
I really want to build a simple skiff, Ed monk design or maybe Ken Swan, or
maybe a nondiscript thing from Gardner's small craft book, I'd like to turn
a 50' troller into a troller yacht, I'd like to build a Carolina Dory for
use in the estuaries, crabbing,.. Herreshof 12 1/2 would quite a project or
the trailerable Joel White version, that would be a a great daysailer for
the family. I recently dreamed of building the Prince Helfrich and Veltie
Pruit boat, early Rapid Robert, that those guys used in the upper Mckenzie
watershed. That's with spruce planks and all.
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two conditions:
1. He is a Greek
2. He is a Fisherman <Roy Blount Jr.>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Boat ideas

 

Chris-

The Papoose cradle boat looks real purty, just like a midget real boat. Are
the frames steam bent?

Is there going to be a launching of a different sort in your family in
a month? <g>

On Tue, 14 Aug 2001 15:51:53 -0000, Chris- wrote:
...
I will try to post some pictures when I get them. I don't have a
scanner at home, and the cradle is actually not finished yet. I
still have to put the frames and trim work in. Just got the planking
done. I have to hurry, I only have a month left before it needs to
be "launched".
...
www.jordanwoodboats.com/bt.htm .
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.
<Mark Twain>


New file uploaded to MessaboutW

MessaboutW@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the MessaboutW
group.

File : /MembersBoats/Thoms.jpg
Uploaded by : jhkohnen@...
Description : Bryn Thoms' Don Hill "Standard" driftboat and Glucester Gull dory

You can access this file at the URL

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/Thoms.jpg

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit

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Regards,

jhkohnen@...


Re: Boat ideas

chnookie
 

Yeah, my cradle is the Baby Tender. Traditional lapstrake, hand
driven copper rivets, steam bent ash frames, and cherry trimwork and
transom. All his designs are pretty nice. I picked mine because it
looked complicated! And yes, we are expecting the 'launching' of our
first in about a month :) .


Re: Mug and Boats

antec007
 

John
You got a picture of me and my wife Kay in your picture.
Bryn Thoms' Don Hill "Standard" driftboat. That's me
right over the transom. "The guy in the neckbrace."
I'll get a better one today. I'll put in a brand
new one of me and my Rapid Robert. It's off the trailer.
We only have one trailer, and our Son Chad has gotten
our Hobie 16 put together and is using it after being
stored next to the "Toad" under the shop for 10 years.
Also going to put in a Pic of my wife, and what a Rapid Robert
is all about.

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon

--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Bryn-

I saw Rich's launch in the Register Guard at a price I couldn't
resist, so
now it's mine. I haven't got the engine going yet, mostly becuase
I've been
busy with other things, but possibly also because of an unconscious
fear
that it'll blow up. <g> I've been fooling with it some the last few
days
and will give it a try tomorrow or the next day. The boat is in
better
shape than your Cruiser, but it's still a diamond in the rough,
I'm not at
all sure that it'll float, even after it swells up. We'll see soon.
I've
wanted one of those one-lungers for decades! I told Rich about this
list,
but I don't know if he's lurking here. Are you here Rich?

Dorena gets its share of motorboating yahoos, but you should have
been at
Cottage Grove reservoir last Sunday, they were really churning the
lake up!
Fortunately most of them went home late in the afternoon and I
managed to
get in some good sailing. The winds at Cottage Grove Lake don't
seem quite
as fluky as at Dorena, probably because the hills surrounding the
lake
aren't as big. It's a small lake, but I'll probably sail there
again--
preferably on weekdays! Dorena can get some good waves just from
the wind
if it's coming up the lake, but nothing as nasty as Fern Ridge.

John McCallum at Applegate Boat Works has adapted a steamboat yawl
for
plywood stitch 'n' glue construction, he claims that's the kind of
boats
that the early McKenzie rivermen used. Does this look anything like
the
Helfrich/Pruitt boat, or was theirs a Kaarhus boat?

http://www.teleport.com/~boatshop/mckenzie.html

I picked up that book about Buzz Holmstrom, the gas pump jockey from
Coquille who ran the Green and Colorado alone in the '30s, from
one of the
authors at the Portland Wooden Boat Show, an excellent read! I
don't think
I'll ever be a whitewater boater, but I can understand what drove
people
like Holmstrom and Helfrich and Pruitt. The book is called 'The
Doing of
the Thing" by a committee of authors, despite which it reads well.
A few
geographical and boatbuilding errors gave me pause, and should have
been
caught by somebody, but they don't detract much from the book.

There's no reason to build a nondescript skiff when there are so
many plans
for nice ones out there. <g>

I don't have a picture of you (Bryn), but I've got one of your
drift boat
and Gloucester Gull.

On Mon, 13 Aug 2001 15:34:02 -0700, Bryn wrote:
That's Rich's Launch, I didn't know you (John) picked that thing
up. My
lapstrake '60s Cruiser's Inc. runabout is from him. I'm
surprised he isn't
on the list, well maybe he is, maybe we just don't hear from
him. I was
eyeing the launch when I went to his house the first time to look
over the
runabout. Did you ever the get the engine going? I was so hot
on launches
and one-lungers awhile ago, that I almost bought that from him, I
realized
that a free boat is bit easier to bring home that one you have to
pay for.
However, your boat from Rich floats, mine is missing the
garboards and
several other integral parts.

John - if you have a photo of me from the Depoe Bay fest, You're
welcome too
put it in the messabout file for the mugs.

I was at Dorena this Sunday, put in on the north side and rowed
the
driftboat out aways and had a great time swimming, it was very
nice, not too
many PWCs or drunken water skiers, just enough to make some
bouncy waves.
The kids loved it, it kinda felt like we were in the ocean,
granted the wave
action isn't real good for the shoreline, but nonetheless, it was
a good
time. I even got a very colorful compliment about my boat from a
drunken
party barge pilot with the kids and grandma right next to me. I
thought it
was quite funny, although I don't think my mother-in-law
appreciated his
language. I could see they were connoisseurs of good taste, cut-
off shorts
and Hams talls.
...
I really want to build a simple skiff, Ed monk design or maybe
Ken Swan, or
maybe a nondiscript thing from Gardner's small craft book, I'd
like to turn
a 50' troller into a troller yacht, I'd like to build a Carolina
Dory for
use in the estuaries, crabbing,.. Herreshof 12 1/2 would quite a
project or
the trailerable Joel White version, that would be a a great
daysailer for
the family. I recently dreamed of building the Prince Helfrich
and Veltie
Pruit boat, early Rapid Robert, that those guys used in the upper
Mckenzie
watershed. That's with spruce planks and all.

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two
conditions:
1. He is a Greek
2. He is a Fisherman <Roy Blount Jr.>


Rapid Robert Plans and Pics

antec007
 

Finally got the Rapid Robert Plans in the files.
Not too much detail, but it was what I built from,
so I know they work.
Also Pics of finished boat. The Molalla looks like it's
a little low. And My Mug, with Depoe Bay shirt.
I think boat is about 14 years old now. Well used,
and it shows. Still sound.
Also pic of my old Johnson Seahorse 15 HP.
Any guess to vintage.
Rapid Robert is a "Fishing Machine" espesially when
my wife Kay is aboard. She is a "Fishing Machine."
Steelhead caught on the Molalla River near Molalla, from
Rapid Robert.
Also threw in Cover Pic of Firecracker Plans.
I think that was the first boat Bryn built.
He can tell about it, and I'll post plans if anybody
is interestd. We may have met at the waterfront.

John, The file sizes are larger than I wanted,
but I'll watch the page, and reduce or dump if we start
to get too much.

Pat Patteson
Molalla, Oregon


The Gray Lives!

 

Well I got my old Gray one-lunger running a while ago, it sounds great! It
took me a long time to figure out just what it wanted as far as spark
advance, throttle, priming, etc. but finally it went-- then just when it
was settling down to running smooth the mickey-mouse arrangement I had to
tilt the gas can it was running off of gave out and it ran out of gas. :o(
When I rigged up a siphon instead the rubber gas line slipped off the
fitting on the carburettor and gas went everywhere. Enough for tonite!
Tomorrow I rinse out the proper gas tank and try again.

Starting those old-timers is interesting, instead of trying to crank the
engine over in the direction you want it to go, you turn the flywheel
_backwards_, up against compression. With luck the engine fires before it
goes over top dead center and bounces back in the direction you want to go
vigorously enough to push it through the next compression cycle, firing
again and away you go! It was easy to get the engine to fire and bounce
back, but the "vigorously" bit was a problem. It's going to take a lot of
practice before I get the thing figured out. Fortunately bouncing the
flywheel isn't too hard of work, you don't have to do it very hard-- in
fact if you do it too vigorously the engine might go over top dead center
and start running backwards!

This is going top be fun. <g>

Now I hope the boat doesn't sink too fast...

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
I Can't take a well-tanned person seriously. <Cleveland Amory>


Re: [MessaboutW] The Gray Lives!

Sandy Thoms <thoms@...>
 

that sounds great about the one-lunger. Oh, this is Bryn at home, I doubt
my wife would spend this much time writing about boats, she thinks I'm a
nut. You'll have to get a messabout together just to show off your launch.

I finished reading the one-lunger book, "Old Marine Engines" by Stan
Grayson, It's a very interseting read, a bit long-winded when it comes to
specific histories of each company, and a bit thin on the actual mechanics
of the engine, but nonetheless, a very interesting treatise on the
one-lunger.

I have the firecracker plans, somewhere, if anyone is really interested in
her. She's a pretty small boat, but quite handy and fast for a short boat.
I'll try ti get photo of me scanned an uploaded. I have a pretty good one
on the McKenzie at Hayden Bridge on the inaugural voyage, wearing my
Springfield camo pants.

Yeah, Pat - I really think that we met years ago at Oak's Park at one of the
early riverswest boat shows. I was probably only 18 or 19 but for some
reason when we met at Depoe Bay you looked really familiar.

A quick note on wood - I found some short (<4 feet) 1 by 3 clear fir at
Bring recycling (Eugene) the other day. Not quite 15 rings per inch but
pretty dense. I snagged a bunch and may use it some day for frames for a
hard-chined skiff. It came from some interior thing possibly from the Serbu
house demo project, I try to keep track of certain demo jobs that Bring
does, that's how to get in on some of the wood before it's gobbled up.
Anyway, there's more there, including some cedar siding (8 to 12', that
might work for planking, maybe with a few extra butt blocks. If only I had
more room to store more stuff. Don't we all wish we had more storage space.
Can you imagine a shop with all the wood and fasteners just waiting to be
used, no lines at Jerry's, no driving here and there. Ok so I dream.

-----Original Message-----
From: jhkohnen@... [mailto:jhkohnen@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2001 8:07 PM
To: MessaboutW@...
Subject: [MessaboutW] The Gray Lives!


Well I got my old Gray one-lunger running a while ago, it sounds great! It
took me a long time to figure out just what it wanted as far as spark
advance, throttle, priming, etc. but finally it went-- then just when it
was settling down to running smooth the mickey-mouse arrangement I had to
tilt the gas can it was running off of gave out and it ran out of gas. :o(
When I rigged up a siphon instead the rubber gas line slipped off the
fitting on the carburettor and gas went everywhere. Enough for tonite!
Tomorrow I rinse out the proper gas tank and try again.

Starting those old-timers is interesting, instead of trying to crank the
engine over in the direction you want it to go, you turn the flywheel
_backwards_, up against compression. With luck the engine fires before it
goes over top dead center and bounces back in the direction you want to go
vigorously enough to push it through the next compression cycle, firing
again and away you go! It was easy to get the engine to fire and bounce
back, but the "vigorously" bit was a problem. It's going to take a lot of
practice before I get the thing figured out. Fortunately bouncing the
flywheel isn't too hard of work, you don't have to do it very hard-- in
fact if you do it too vigorously the engine might go over top dead center
and start running backwards!

This is going top be fun. <g>

Now I hope the boat doesn't sink too fast...

--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
I Can't take a well-tanned person seriously. <Cleveland Amory>



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Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Boat ideas

 

Chris-

Congratulations! But do you think you'll still have time to build a boat?
;O)

On Wed, 15 Aug 2001 17:10:18 -0000, Chris wrote:
...
And yes, we are expecting the 'launching' of our
first in about a month :) .
--
John <@Jkohnen>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
<Craig O'Donnell>