Date   

Car Engine for boat

antec007
 

I haven't done it, but have been interested.
(I think I'm intersted in about everything)

Wooden Boat Magazine had a design contest a few year
ago for a Subabu Auto engine powered boat.
I got the first issue on it, but not the one on the actual
conversion.
This is the issue
converting a Subaru engine for marine use, 134:52
Other references can be found by typing in Subaru at search.
http://catboat1.woodenboat.com/wbindex/search.html

I've been trying to find out more as I think Subaru
woud be great for Boat use. (Small,flat,long lived,economical)
I'm too cheap to spring for a back issue.
Any body Got #134.
I would be interested in what changes need to be made,
and how expensive the thing would be.
There's a ton of Subaru's out there.

I did see a work boat over at Yaquina Bay years ago
that had a standard car or truck engine and transmision
of unknows make, with a propeller shaft attached to the
U joint off the tanny and a steel frame to support the
shaft and prop.
The shaft and prop could be uphauled out of the water.
Looked very crude, but looked like it must have worked,
as the boat looked Very much used.

I have seen a "Log Pusher" and thought about that after
writing. Have also seen "Bumper Boats" amusment park
rides that do the same thing.

Pat







--- In MessaboutW@y..., thoms.bryn@d... wrote:
The log pusher. Several years ago I was collecting sediment
samples on
WeyCo. Springfield's log pond in the middle of winter. It was very
foggy
and I felt like we were in a calm piece of the ocean or a harbor,
because
you couldn't see the edges. You could here the noises, though,
like the
steam out of the stacks and the rumbling of the machinery, and most
of all
the smell of sulfur, (around here we call that the "smell of
money").
Anyway, one of the log pond fellows had a log pusher (steel hull),
I'm sure
he had a more appropriate name for it, I can't remember it though,
that he
used to push the last remaining logs to the chain and mill at the
west end
for final removal. While we were out in the log pond on a pontoon
boat
driving core, he would offer assistance with his log pusher. One
time, out
of my dismay for his disregard to THE UNION, he let me drive the
thing
around a bit. It was like a bucking bronco, or a weeble wobble on
water. I
swear we were gonna tip over. Anyway, it had a wheel directly of
over the
outboard shaft and you could spin that boat in circles or do all
sorts of
weird maneuvers. There was no reverse, you just very quickly
turned the
wheel 180 degrees. If you would fart around at 90 or 270 or
anything in
between 0 and 180 you'd start going sideways. The operator was a
pro, he
had been out on that log pond for probably a good 20 years. He was
a dying
breed, I suppose. Soon after we completed the job, WeyCo.,
decommissioned
the log pond and it turned it into chip storage. I noticed they
had a
couple of the log pushers, and if I my memory serves me correctly,
both
boats were left high and dry in the boneyard. I wonder if there
are still
out there. Seems a shame they don't have them on display in a
museum, or up
at the front desk, or something like that.

Another fun job at the log pond, was when we strapped a trackhoe to
a very
small steel barge to collect sediment samples. I was the geo that
was
logging the samples when the trackhoe bucket would drop a big pile
of
rotting elephant dung on the deck in front of me. It was a great
job, I had
to hang on every time the trackhoe would stick his arm out over the
edge of
the barge and the gunwale would drop under water, I'd be on the
upper side,
right behind the roaring diesel. Then the arm would come up and
the barge
would slosh back to the other side, I'd get up close to the side of
trackhoe
as the operator would swing the bucket over in front of me and drop
his
load. The whole time I would be scrambling around trying to stay
dry and be
ready for a capsize (unlikely, but it sure felt like it).

That's fun thinking about the field days.

Anyone, installed a car engine in a boat?

-----Original Message-----
From: jhkohnen@b... [mailto:jhkohnen@b...]
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 12:22 AM
To: MessaboutW@y...
Subject: Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Hopeless Boat Nut


Pat-

Ever seen one of those little boats they use to herd logs around in
a log
pond? I've been wracking my brain, but I can't recall what they're
called.
Anyway, they're short, fat, and have an outboard mounted right in
the
middle, arranged to spin around 360 degrees. Nowadays the motors in
a
special mount that spins, with a circular "handle" on top that the
operator
uses like a steering wheel. Last year at the antique outboard
showing in
Florence there was a great big, long shaft 10 hp. Evinrude built
for the
Navy in WW II that had a circular handle all around the powerhead.
It was
geared way down and had a huge propeller for pushing barges around,
and the
circular handle was to spin it around for reverse (no gearchange).
The
old-timer who brought it said that after the war surplus ones were
used on
those little log pushers. It may be there again this year (plug,
plug).
With dry decking replacing all the log ponds it's hard to find a
place to
see one of those little pushers in action anymore. A friend of mine
used to
drive on at the Hull-Oakes mill at Dawson (west of Bellfountain),
but I
never went up there to see him work it. If the motor on their log
pusher is
anything like the machinery in the mill (still running their saws
with
steam!) it's probably worth a look. Maybe it's one of those old Navy
Evinrudes?

I saw one of those boats at Depoe Bay a while back, a fairly big
one, steel
and black. For some reason I thought it was the tug for the port.
It'd make
a good one. Know anything about it Jack?

No water in the lake at Detroit either...


Re: [MessaboutW] Car Engine for boat

thoms.bryn@...
 

I was just readin that issue last night. That's exactly the reason why I
asked the question earlier. the artic;le is from 1997. The author said you
could pick up a subaru flat four for about $400 to $800, a hurth
transmission (specialized) for $300, or something like that. a bunch of
other parts, like different carb, different cooling, different exhaust,....
All in all it would probably be cheaper than a new four stroke outboard, of
comparable horsepower.

That's the plan now for the 16 foot runabout. There's a little more Hp in
the four cylinder inboard, than I need for the boat, but heck, it sure would
be a fun project.

-----Original Message-----
From: pateson@colton.com [mailto:pateson@colton.com]
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 9:45 AM
To: MessaboutW@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [MessaboutW] Car Engine for boat


I haven't done it, but have been interested.
(I think I'm intersted in about everything)

Wooden Boat Magazine had a design contest a few year
ago for a Subabu Auto engine powered boat.
I got the first issue on it, but not the one on the actual
conversion.
This is the issue
converting a Subaru engine for marine use, 134:52
Other references can be found by typing in Subaru at search.
http://catboat1.woodenboat.com/wbindex/search.html

I've been trying to find out more as I think Subaru
woud be great for Boat use. (Small,flat,long lived,economical)
I'm too cheap to spring for a back issue.
Any body Got #134.
I would be interested in what changes need to be made,
and how expensive the thing would be.
There's a ton of Subaru's out there.

I did see a work boat over at Yaquina Bay years ago
that had a standard car or truck engine and transmision
of unknows make, with a propeller shaft attached to the
U joint off the tanny and a steel frame to support the
shaft and prop.
The shaft and prop could be uphauled out of the water.
Looked very crude, but looked like it must have worked,
as the boat looked Very much used.

I have seen a "Log Pusher" and thought about that after
writing. Have also seen "Bumper Boats" amusment park
rides that do the same thing.

Pat







--- In MessaboutW@y..., thoms.bryn@d... wrote:
The log pusher. Several years ago I was collecting sediment
samples on
WeyCo. Springfield's log pond in the middle of winter. It was very
foggy
and I felt like we were in a calm piece of the ocean or a harbor,
because
you couldn't see the edges. You could here the noises, though,
like the
steam out of the stacks and the rumbling of the machinery, and most
of all
the smell of sulfur, (around here we call that the "smell of
money").
Anyway, one of the log pond fellows had a log pusher (steel hull),
I'm sure
he had a more appropriate name for it, I can't remember it though,
that he
used to push the last remaining logs to the chain and mill at the
west end
for final removal. While we were out in the log pond on a pontoon
boat
driving core, he would offer assistance with his log pusher. One
time, out
of my dismay for his disregard to THE UNION, he let me drive the
thing
around a bit. It was like a bucking bronco, or a weeble wobble on
water. I
swear we were gonna tip over. Anyway, it had a wheel directly of
over the
outboard shaft and you could spin that boat in circles or do all
sorts of
weird maneuvers. There was no reverse, you just very quickly
turned the
wheel 180 degrees. If you would fart around at 90 or 270 or
anything in
between 0 and 180 you'd start going sideways. The operator was a
pro, he
had been out on that log pond for probably a good 20 years. He was
a dying
breed, I suppose. Soon after we completed the job, WeyCo.,
decommissioned
the log pond and it turned it into chip storage. I noticed they
had a
couple of the log pushers, and if I my memory serves me correctly,
both
boats were left high and dry in the boneyard. I wonder if there
are still
out there. Seems a shame they don't have them on display in a
museum, or up
at the front desk, or something like that.

Another fun job at the log pond, was when we strapped a trackhoe to
a very
small steel barge to collect sediment samples. I was the geo that
was
logging the samples when the trackhoe bucket would drop a big pile
of
rotting elephant dung on the deck in front of me. It was a great
job, I had
to hang on every time the trackhoe would stick his arm out over the
edge of
the barge and the gunwale would drop under water, I'd be on the
upper side,
right behind the roaring diesel. Then the arm would come up and
the barge
would slosh back to the other side, I'd get up close to the side of
trackhoe
as the operator would swing the bucket over in front of me and drop
his
load. The whole time I would be scrambling around trying to stay
dry and be
ready for a capsize (unlikely, but it sure felt like it).

That's fun thinking about the field days.

Anyone, installed a car engine in a boat?

-----Original Message-----
From: jhkohnen@b... [mailto:jhkohnen@b...]
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 12:22 AM
To: MessaboutW@y...
Subject: Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Hopeless Boat Nut


Pat-

Ever seen one of those little boats they use to herd logs around in
a log
pond? I've been wracking my brain, but I can't recall what they're
called.
Anyway, they're short, fat, and have an outboard mounted right in
the
middle, arranged to spin around 360 degrees. Nowadays the motors in
a
special mount that spins, with a circular "handle" on top that the
operator
uses like a steering wheel. Last year at the antique outboard
showing in
Florence there was a great big, long shaft 10 hp. Evinrude built
for the
Navy in WW II that had a circular handle all around the powerhead.
It was
geared way down and had a huge propeller for pushing barges around,
and the
circular handle was to spin it around for reverse (no gearchange).
The
old-timer who brought it said that after the war surplus ones were
used on
those little log pushers. It may be there again this year (plug,
plug).
With dry decking replacing all the log ponds it's hard to find a
place to
see one of those little pushers in action anymore. A friend of mine
used to
drive on at the Hull-Oakes mill at Dawson (west of Bellfountain),
but I
never went up there to see him work it. If the motor on their log
pusher is
anything like the machinery in the mill (still running their saws
with
steam!) it's probably worth a look. Maybe it's one of those old Navy
Evinrudes?

I saw one of those boats at Depoe Bay a while back, a fairly big
one, steel
and black. For some reason I thought it was the tug for the port.
It'd make
a good one. Know anything about it Jack?

No water in the lake at Detroit either...



No flaming, cursing or public mopery. Please be polite.
To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
MessaboutW-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Car Engine for boat

antec007
 

What type of propeller drive do they use? Outdrive, straight, etc.
And what do they use for the exhauset/cooling?
That's usually a complicated, expensive part.

Pat


--- In MessaboutW@y..., thoms.bryn@d... wrote:
I was just readin that issue last night. That's exactly the reason
why I
asked the question earlier. the artic;le is from 1997. The author
said you
could pick up a subaru flat four for about $400 to $800, a hurth
transmission (specialized) for $300, or something like that. a
bunch of
other parts, like different carb, different cooling, different
exhaust,....
All in all it would probably be cheaper than a new four stroke
outboard, of
comparable horsepower.

That's the plan now for the 16 foot runabout. There's a little
more Hp in
the four cylinder inboard, than I need for the boat, but heck, it
sure would
be a fun project.

-----Original Message-----
From: pateson@c... [mailto:pateson@c...]
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 9:45 AM
To: MessaboutW@y...
Subject: [MessaboutW] Car Engine for boat


I haven't done it, but have been interested.
(I think I'm intersted in about everything)

Wooden Boat Magazine had a design contest a few year
ago for a Subabu Auto engine powered boat.
I got the first issue on it, but not the one on the actual
conversion.
This is the issue
converting a Subaru engine for marine use, 134:52
Other references can be found by typing in Subaru at search.
http://catboat1.woodenboat.com/wbindex/search.html

I've been trying to find out more as I think Subaru
woud be great for Boat use. (Small,flat,long lived,economical)
I'm too cheap to spring for a back issue.
Any body Got #134.
I would be interested in what changes need to be made,
and how expensive the thing would be.
There's a ton of Subaru's out there.

I did see a work boat over at Yaquina Bay years ago
that had a standard car or truck engine and transmision
of unknows make, with a propeller shaft attached to the
U joint off the tanny and a steel frame to support the
shaft and prop.
The shaft and prop could be uphauled out of the water.
Looked very crude, but looked like it must have worked,
as the boat looked Very much used.

I have seen a "Log Pusher" and thought about that after
writing. Have also seen "Bumper Boats" amusment park
rides that do the same thing.

Pat







--- In MessaboutW@y..., thoms.bryn@d... wrote:
The log pusher. Several years ago I was collecting sediment
samples on
WeyCo. Springfield's log pond in the middle of winter. It was
very
foggy
and I felt like we were in a calm piece of the ocean or a harbor,
because
you couldn't see the edges. You could here the noises, though,
like the
steam out of the stacks and the rumbling of the machinery, and
most
of all
the smell of sulfur, (around here we call that the "smell of
money").
Anyway, one of the log pond fellows had a log pusher (steel
hull),
I'm sure
he had a more appropriate name for it, I can't remember it
though,
that he
used to push the last remaining logs to the chain and mill at the
west end
for final removal. While we were out in the log pond on a
pontoon
boat
driving core, he would offer assistance with his log pusher. One
time, out
of my dismay for his disregard to THE UNION, he let me drive the
thing
around a bit. It was like a bucking bronco, or a weeble wobble
on
water. I
swear we were gonna tip over. Anyway, it had a wheel directly of
over the
outboard shaft and you could spin that boat in circles or do all
sorts of
weird maneuvers. There was no reverse, you just very quickly
turned the
wheel 180 degrees. If you would fart around at 90 or 270 or
anything in
between 0 and 180 you'd start going sideways. The operator was a
pro, he
had been out on that log pond for probably a good 20 years. He
was
a dying
breed, I suppose. Soon after we completed the job, WeyCo.,
decommissioned
the log pond and it turned it into chip storage. I noticed they
had a
couple of the log pushers, and if I my memory serves me
correctly,
both
boats were left high and dry in the boneyard. I wonder if there
are still
out there. Seems a shame they don't have them on display in a
museum, or up
at the front desk, or something like that.

Another fun job at the log pond, was when we strapped a trackhoe
to
a very
small steel barge to collect sediment samples. I was the geo
that
was
logging the samples when the trackhoe bucket would drop a big
pile
of
rotting elephant dung on the deck in front of me. It was a great
job, I had
to hang on every time the trackhoe would stick his arm out over
the
edge of
the barge and the gunwale would drop under water, I'd be on the
upper side,
right behind the roaring diesel. Then the arm would come up and
the barge
would slosh back to the other side, I'd get up close to the side
of
trackhoe
as the operator would swing the bucket over in front of me and
drop
his
load. The whole time I would be scrambling around trying to stay
dry and be
ready for a capsize (unlikely, but it sure felt like it).

That's fun thinking about the field days.

Anyone, installed a car engine in a boat?

-----Original Message-----
From: jhkohnen@b... [mailto:jhkohnen@b...]
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 12:22 AM
To: MessaboutW@y...
Subject: Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Hopeless Boat Nut


Pat-

Ever seen one of those little boats they use to herd logs around
in
a log
pond? I've been wracking my brain, but I can't recall what
they're
called.
Anyway, they're short, fat, and have an outboard mounted right in
the
middle, arranged to spin around 360 degrees. Nowadays the motors
in
a
special mount that spins, with a circular "handle" on top that
the
operator
uses like a steering wheel. Last year at the antique outboard
showing in
Florence there was a great big, long shaft 10 hp. Evinrude built
for the
Navy in WW II that had a circular handle all around the
powerhead.
It was
geared way down and had a huge propeller for pushing barges
around,
and the
circular handle was to spin it around for reverse (no
gearchange).
The
old-timer who brought it said that after the war surplus ones
were
used on
those little log pushers. It may be there again this year (plug,
plug).
With dry decking replacing all the log ponds it's hard to find a
place to
see one of those little pushers in action anymore. A friend of
mine
used to
drive on at the Hull-Oakes mill at Dawson (west of Bellfountain),
but I
never went up there to see him work it. If the motor on their log
pusher is
anything like the machinery in the mill (still running their saws
with
steam!) it's probably worth a look. Maybe it's one of those old
Navy
Evinrudes?

I saw one of those boats at Depoe Bay a while back, a fairly big
one, steel
and black. For some reason I thought it was the tug for the port.
It'd make
a good one. Know anything about it Jack?

No water in the lake at Detroit either...



No flaming, cursing or public mopery. Please be polite.
To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
MessaboutW-unsubscribe@y...



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Log Pond Tug

 

"Log bronc" sounds right. Perhaps this is the ultimate expression of the
concept (found in an old Mariner's Catalog):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BumperBoat.jpg

I've been meaning to take the tour of the Hull-Oakes mill for years. I
better do it soon. Ralph Hull is getting old and feeble, but he might still
be giving the tours himself. He's quite a fellow, from all accounts. My
friend said he was great to work for. Maybe we can have a dry-land
messabout to Dawson for the tour? <g>

On Fri, 31 Aug 2001 15:40:36 -0000, Carter wrote:

I *think* it many be called a log bronc. I have the Hull-Oakes video
and if I get around to it, I can watch it and see if I can confirm
that.

Incidentally, the Hull-Oakes mill is the last mill using steam power.
They give tours and it is worth the drive if you are interested at
all in old technology.

Carter
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Nobody ought to wear a Greek fisherman's hat unless they meet two conditions:
1. He is a Greek
2. He is a Fisherman <Roy Blount Jr.>


GP-16/18 Help

antec007
 

I have my "Official Plans" for my GP-16.

I'm gonna actually start cutting wood one of these days.
I want to know how it will end up befor I start,
and be as "Comfy" and "User Friendly" as it can be.
This might be my last, best shot at the "Perfect Boat".

I am still in need of some design help.
As designed, sleeping is to be in a "Boom Tent" in
the Cockpit.
I am not real crazy about that Idea. I would prefer
to have a more permanent sleeping arrangemeant.
One of the main reasons I'm building this boat is
so I don't have to "Set Up A Tent" to sleep. (Done that.)
Also, would like to have a convenient place for my naps
while Kay catches dinner. She catches, I cook.
I want to sleep "In the Cabin" at night.
I would not object to adding 2' to leangth, as this seems
to be the way most are being built and would give me
2' more to play with. Convertible bed OK for Night Sleeping.


Boat is 15'9" (17'9") x 7'hull, with motor on a bracket on the stern.

I would also like to have the Motor hung on the transom
where I can get to it without gymanastics.

I think I would also like to put inside mounted steering
tillers, one forward, and one aft, and maybe also a continuous
rope loop around inside of boat so I could steer from anywhere
on the boat.
Question: Which way does the boat turn when I push forward
on the vertical tiller? (Dumb question, but important.)
Speed and shift control to be detrmined later.

I have lots of "Good Ideas" for "Other People's Boats",
but can't seem to figure these out for "Mine".

I'm going to put in some views of the boat im my folder.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/Pat%
20Patteson%27s%20Boats/GP-16-18/

Those are pretty small. I'll put in some larger, but
anybody that wants to look at those and come
up with suggestions, Any Ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks, sometimes I'm not as smart as I think, but I
try to hang out with "Smart Friends" to make up
for it. (-;

Feel free to email me with any Ideas too.
That's my real email there. pateson@colton.com

Pat


Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival

 

Just a reminder that a bunch of (mostly Bolgerian) boat nuts will be
meeting at the Chesapeake Light Craft booth at the PT festival Saturday
morning at 10:00. We'll probably repair to a nearby bakery for coffee,
rolls and boat talk. So far the weatherman is promising good weather for
the festival weekend...

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into jail;
for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned...
A man in jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company.
<Samuel Johnson>


Elk City Trip Pix

 

I've put some pictures from the Elk City run Dick Mitsch, his brother Bob
and myself made in early August into the files section:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/Yaquina%20Bay/ElkCity/

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be
pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying virtues.
<Elizabeth Taylor>


Now where did I put that whiskey?

chnookie
 

Had to tell someone. The Baby Tender is finally done. I am only
waiting for my mother-in-law to finish the lining for the
matress,etc. All construction and finishing is done, and it is
standing in our living room. I'm glad I got it done in time, but
gotta say, I feel kind of funny not having a major project to work
on. I'm sure that will be replaced by the new baby, but after
that....? Hmmm, Boat Plans II thread? Hehe. I will post pictures
as soon as possible. We just started a new roll of film, so it may
be awhile. I did finally find bronze screws in Portland. West
Marine had them, but only in Phillips head, close enough.
Wink's did have some copper rivets, in case anyone cares. After
rounding up all the obscure hardware, stitch-and-glue is looking
pretty good for my next project. Oh well. You gotta do something
like this once, right? Hope everyone has a good time in PT.
Wish I could go. There always seems to be something keeping
me here when its going on.


Re: Now where did I put that whiskey?

antec007
 

Pour me a big one when you find it.

Congratulations. Nice project.

From your writings and the pics it must be beautiful.

Get'm into small boats as soon as possible.
Kinda the same bobbing they's been doing for
the last nine months, soothing.
(Must be why I have to Bob to make me feel OK.)

We didn't bother with the Cradle Boat.
We went right to the real thing.
Chad was born May 14, 1975, and we had him out
fishing with us by mid June.
Big bassinet in the center of our 16' Dory.
He didn't catch much, except the love of boats.

Don't plan any major projects for a while.
You already have a big one in the works.
(And there really isn't going to be "an after
that" for quite a while.)
Enjoy every minute of it.
Congratulations on that too, but then...
Real congratulations should go to your wife.

Good luck.

Pat

--- In MessaboutW@y..., chnookie@h... wrote:
Had to tell someone. The Baby Tender is finally done. I am only
waiting for my mother-in-law to finish the lining for the
matress,etc. All construction and finishing is done, and it is
standing in our living room. I'm glad I got it done in time, but
gotta say, I feel kind of funny not having a major project to work
on. I'm sure that will be replaced by the new baby, but after
that....? Hmmm, Boat Plans II thread? Hehe. I will post pictures
as soon as possible. We just started a new roll of film, so it may
be awhile. I did finally find bronze screws in Portland. West
Marine had them, but only in Phillips head, close enough.
Wink's did have some copper rivets, in case anyone cares. After
rounding up all the obscure hardware, stitch-and-glue is looking
pretty good for my next project. Oh well. You gotta do something
like this once, right? Hope everyone has a good time in PT.
Wish I could go. There always seems to be something keeping
me here when its going on.


Re: Now where did I put that whiskey?

antec007
 

Pictures

Don't know how strapped for dough you are, but if you can come up
with some extra, this would be a great time to buy a Digital Camera.
Prices aren't too bad for a good one, and you will certainly
have a "Subject".
Kay's MRW Organization just got one, and we are the caretakers
of it. Great thing is, after it's paid for, all the pictures
are essentially "Free".
She bought a Cannon A20 Zoom. (Ater much research by Chad)
128M Memory card (120+ 1600x1200 pics) Great quality.
2 sets of 1800mAh NiMH bateries and a charger. (shot over 70 pics
on one set Saturday)
A little over $500 for the whole works.

Do shoot the 35mm too. So far there's nothing like them,
and you know those won't change format, but the Digitals
are great, and you can make Prints of the Good ones that
you can save.
btw Chad is a Professional photographer in one of his lives.

Just a thought.

Pat

--- In MessaboutW@y..., chnookie@h... wrote:
Had to tell someone. The Baby Tender is finally done. I am only
waiting for my mother-in-law to finish the lining for the
matress,etc. All construction and finishing is done, and it is
standing in our living room. I'm glad I got it done in time, but
gotta say, I feel kind of funny not having a major project to work
on. I'm sure that will be replaced by the new baby, but after
that....? Hmmm, Boat Plans II thread? Hehe. I will post pictures
as soon as possible. We just started a new roll of film, so it may
be awhile. I did finally find bronze screws in Portland. West
Marine had them, but only in Phillips head, close enough.
Wink's did have some copper rivets, in case anyone cares. After
rounding up all the obscure hardware, stitch-and-glue is looking
pretty good for my next project. Oh well. You gotta do something
like this once, right? Hope everyone has a good time in PT.
Wish I could go. There always seems to be something keeping
me here when its going on.


Re: Elk City Trip Pix

antec007
 

Beautiful Pictures John.
Makes me even more sorry that I missed it.

Pat

--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
I've put some pictures from the Elk City run Dick Mitsch, his
brother Bob
and myself made in early August into the files section:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/Yaquina%
20Bay/ElkCity/

--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you
can be
pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying
virtues.
<Elizabeth Taylor>


Elk City Trip Pix.

ajohn1926@...
 

John,

Great pictures. Looks like a very restful area to putz around in
with a small engine or oars. No worries about high wind gusts or jet
ski revelers.

John T.


Re: [MessaboutW] Elk City Trip Pix

Jack & Maggie Brown <mjbrown@...>
 

John, et. al

Wonderful photos of the Elk River trip. Very sorry I was unable to join you all.

Jack


Re: [MessaboutW] GP-16/18 Help

 

Pat-

You've got some good ideas. On a boat like a GP-16 you can do a lot of
fiddling with the design without hurting the performance, which will be
modest anyway. Lengthening the boat might actually help things.

After trying my little Honda on a bracket I've decided that I just plain
don't like the things. They're a necessary evil for mounting an auxiliary
on many boats, but if you can help it, why put the engine hanging way out
astern? Forfeit some of your added 2' and put the engine on the transom.
Heck, why not add a few more feet and put it in well! <g>

How about extending the top of the wheelhouse aft, holding it up with a few
stanchions, and then making canvas sides and end to enclose a sleeping
place. Remember how Ginger's cockpit works?

http://www.boat-links.com/DepoeBay/00/BoatFest-2.html

You'd leave your bed made up most of the time for naps, but if you wanted
more outdoor space all you'd need to do would be unzip a few zippers and
the walls would come down. The setup would also be light, and with the
curtains removed the windage might not be as bad as a permanent enclosure.

If your vertical tiller is mounted on the starboard side and the pivot is
_below_ the tiller rope (usually the most practical arrangement anyway)
the boat will turn to port when you push the tiller forward (it pulls the
motor's tiller to starboard), and the boat will go to starboard when you
pull the tiller back. If the tiller is mounted on the port side of the boat
pushing it forward makes the boat go to starboard. Pretty reasonable and
easy to understand, downright intuitive. Throttle and shift can be dealt
with with a little ingenuity and a few control cables. Be warned that
cheap _long_ control cables can be hard to find. I once ran all around town
trying to find a 25' choke cable for a boat, maybe it wouldn't have been so
bad if some of the folks I asked hadn't thought I was looking for a 25'
"choker" cable and sent me on wild goose chases! <g>

I've been thinking of rigging up a "push-pull" tiller on my little Honda so
I can get my weight out of the stern and still steer.

push-pull stick
o------------------------o
oo
ooo - sideways tiller
oooooooo
rudder

_Those_ things work completely backwards, to my mind. Pull the stick
forward and you turn to port, in the example above. Like riding a
motorcycle with the shift lever on the left. :o(

On Sat, 01 Sep 2001 18:05:17 -0000, Pat wrote:
...
I am still in need of some design help.
As designed, sleeping is to be in a "Boom Tent" in
the Cockpit.
I am not real crazy about that Idea. I would prefer
to have a more permanent sleeping arrangemeant.
One of the main reasons I'm building this boat is
so I don't have to "Set Up A Tent" to sleep. (Done that.)
Also, would like to have a convenient place for my naps
while Kay catches dinner. She catches, I cook.
I want to sleep "In the Cabin" at night.
I would not object to adding 2' to leangth, as this seems
to be the way most are being built and would give me
2' more to play with. Convertible bed OK for Night Sleeping.


Boat is 15'9" (17'9") x 7'hull, with motor on a bracket on the stern.

I would also like to have the Motor hung on the transom
where I can get to it without gymanastics.

I think I would also like to put inside mounted steering
tillers, one forward, and one aft, and maybe also a continuous
rope loop around inside of boat so I could steer from anywhere
on the boat.
Question: Which way does the boat turn when I push forward
on the vertical tiller? (Dumb question, but important.)
Speed and shift control to be detrmined later.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns; he should be drawn and quoted.
<Fred Allen>


Re: [MessaboutW] Now where did I put that whiskey?

 

Congratulations Chris! One launching down, only one more to go...

On Mon, 03 Sep 2001 16:44:14 -0000, Chris wrote:
Had to tell someone. The Baby Tender is finally done.
...
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you can be
pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying virtues.
<Elizabeth Taylor>


Re: [MessaboutW] Re: Elk City Trip Pix

 

I'm sorry you missed it too, Pat. I needed some ballast to keep Pickle's
bow down. <g>

On Mon, 03 Sep 2001 18:06:38 -0000, Pat wrote:
Beautiful Pictures John.
Makes me even more sorry that I missed it.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
I care not for a man's religion whose dog or cat are not the better for it.
<Abraham Lincoln>


Re: GP-16/18 Help

antec007
 

That's what I thought on the side tiller.
(But what I think and what's "Right" aren't always the same.
I guess I would look at it as if I were to take that side
mounted tiller and just move it around in front of me,
then pushing the tiller to port would make the boat turn port.

Naps have been a big thing with me, even befor my surgery,
and I don't much like sleeping in a chair. I wanna lay down.

Bracket is definately out. I am never going to own a brand
new motor that will always start and never need attention.
I want it where I can get to it. Always liked the nice big
engine rooms on large boats, where the engine is completly
accesible, like being on an engine stand.

My GP-16 will be of minimal performance, at least at first.
Only as fast as my 15 old ponies will push it.
Have even thought of a detachable extension for the bottom
that would fair the bottom up, so it would be a better
displacement boat. One that could be removed if I ever
get the 50+ HP motor recomended.
Do you think that would do any good. That big square stern
is going to cause quite some drag.
Performand with the big motors is supposed to be great,
with that huge planing surface.

This basic scow design is almost identical to one of the
first boats I built when I was about twelve.
8'x4'1'. Fully decked scow of 5/8" plywood.
7 1/2 HP Elgine Motor.
Went like a bat out of hell with just one 12yo on it,
but lacked direction stability. No keel.
Turn the motor, and the boat would yaw, but continue
in the same direction. Quite interesting when I came to
the end of the long narrow lake at full bore the first time.
Completly watertight, which was a good thing, because
we discovered that with 3 12yo's and full power, if two
of those moved to the bow, it became a submarine. OOPS
No blood, no fowl. Motor only worked a couple of days.
After that it was just a great "Messing About Boat" for
3 twelve year olds.

I still have it. I think it was probably just a coil or points,
but never have looked at in since.
I take that back. I just went out and turned the flyweel.
It turned.
I had forgotten that we painted the cover Pink, with
Black "Pink Panther" hand lettered on both sides,
and Black Twin "Racing Stripes" on the top. Cool.
Got any old 7 1/5 horse Elgine points and coils kicking around?
I might have 22 1/2 HP on my new boat. Maybe I'll get the
full 50 HP 7 1/2 HP at a time. (It does have a 7'wide transome.)
About 40 years since it ran, so I guess it's a low time motor.

Curtains just might work. Hadn't thought of that.
Just don't want to "Put up a Tent"
I'm Gonna have to build a 1/4 scale model and play with it.
I might just build the Hull of the GP-16/18 and let the
"Cabin" evolve.
I could spend a long time up that River to Elk City.
Looks like it was made for a GP-16.
Probably a lot of boats that looked like it have been up there.

My 15 Johnson is set up for remote controls. I'll figure something.
Thought of Radio control for the whole thing, with servos.
That would be too cool. Full control from the landing ramp.

Still, Too much time.

Pat




--- In MessaboutW@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
Pat-

You've got some good ideas. On a boat like a GP-16 you can do a lot
of
fiddling with the design without hurting the performance, which
will be
modest anyway. Lengthening the boat might actually help things.

After trying my little Honda on a bracket I've decided that I just
plain
don't like the things. They're a necessary evil for mounting an
auxiliary
on many boats, but if you can help it, why put the engine hanging
way out
astern? Forfeit some of your added 2' and put the engine on the
transom.
Heck, why not add a few more feet and put it in well! <g>

How about extending the top of the wheelhouse aft, holding it up
with a few
stanchions, and then making canvas sides and end to enclose a
sleeping
place. Remember how Ginger's cockpit works?

http://www.boat-links.com/DepoeBay/00/BoatFest-2.html

You'd leave your bed made up most of the time for naps, but if you
wanted
more outdoor space all you'd need to do would be unzip a few
zippers and
the walls would come down. The setup would also be light, and with
the
curtains removed the windage might not be as bad as a permanent
enclosure.

If your vertical tiller is mounted on the starboard side and the
pivot is
_below_ the tiller rope (usually the most practical arrangement
anyway)
the boat will turn to port when you push the tiller forward (it
pulls the
motor's tiller to starboard), and the boat will go to starboard
when you
pull the tiller back. If the tiller is mounted on the port side of
the boat
pushing it forward makes the boat go to starboard. Pretty
reasonable and
easy to understand, downright intuitive. Throttle and shift can be
dealt
with with a little ingenuity and a few control cables. Be warned
that
cheap _long_ control cables can be hard to find. I once ran all
around town
trying to find a 25' choke cable for a boat, maybe it wouldn't have
been so
bad if some of the folks I asked hadn't thought I was looking for a
25'
"choker" cable and sent me on wild goose chases! <g>

I've been thinking of rigging up a "push-pull" tiller on my little
Honda so
I can get my weight out of the stern and still steer.

push-pull stick
o------------------------o
oo
ooo - sideways tiller
oooooooo
rudder

_Those_ things work completely backwards, to my mind. Pull the stick
forward and you turn to port, in the example above. Like riding a
motorcycle with the shift lever on the left. :o(


On Sat, 01 Sep 2001 18:05:17 -0000, Pat wrote:
...
I am still in need of some design help.
As designed, sleeping is to be in a "Boom Tent" in
the Cockpit.
I am not real crazy about that Idea. I would prefer
to have a more permanent sleeping arrangemeant.
One of the main reasons I'm building this boat is
so I don't have to "Set Up A Tent" to sleep. (Done that.)
Also, would like to have a convenient place for my naps
while Kay catches dinner. She catches, I cook.
I want to sleep "In the Cabin" at night.
I would not object to adding 2' to leangth, as this seems
to be the way most are being built and would give me
2' more to play with. Convertible bed OK for Night Sleeping.


Boat is 15'9" (17'9") x 7'hull, with motor on a bracket on the
stern.

I would also like to have the Motor hung on the transom
where I can get to it without gymanastics.

I think I would also like to put inside mounted steering
tillers, one forward, and one aft, and maybe also a continuous
rope loop around inside of boat so I could steer from anywhere
on the boat.
Question: Which way does the boat turn when I push forward
on the vertical tiller? (Dumb question, but important.)
Speed and shift control to be detrmined later.
...
--
John <jkohnen@b...>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns; he should be drawn
and quoted.
<Fred Allen>


Software...

chnookie
 

Has anyone used this program? There is a free demo available for
IBM's. Pretty fun to play with, but I haven't decided if it's worth
the 150$ price to get the functional version. With the demo, you can
play around with different designs though. Pretty cool. Just not
sure how to get them off the computer sans the 150$. Take a look
sometime....all for plywood too.

http://www.plyboats.com/


Port Townsend Boat Festival

 

I had a great time at the Wooden Boat Festival; good weather (though the
winds were too light most of the time), good friends, and plenty of
beautiful boats! I spent Saturday afternoon out on the water in a friend's
Bolger Chebacco Boat (I fell further in love with it) and most of Sunday
out in Pickle. It was a bit exciting trying to stay out of the way of the
big schooners charging around during the "parade" Sunday afternoon! One
high point was climbing down into the engine room of the 1899 tugboat
Katahdin while her 1944 Washington Diesel was running, idling at 80 RPM
(puts out 240 at about 360 RPM). 1944 sounds pretty modern, but the
Washington was of archaic design, with exposed valvegear and other neat
features. It sounded great!

I took too many pictures, maybe some of them turned out. I'll scan some and
put them online before too long.

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
<Craig O'Donnell>


Re: [MessaboutW] Software...

 

I've tried the Plyboats demo, I wasn't impressed. I admit that I didn't put
a lot of effort into trying to figure it out, but then it shouldn't have
needed so much work if it was any good. I felt limited by the program, and
it felt counterintuitive (to use a big word). The interface was too clunky,
and I couldn't figure out how to import offsets. I ended up buying Blue
Peter's Hullform 8S on sale a while back, and while it too require a lot of
head scratching it seems to be worth the effort. Blue Peter also gives away
an obsolete version of their software:

http://www.iinet.net.au/~bluep/

But the best program for casual plywood boat design is Gregg Carlson's
freeware Hulls:

http://www.carlsondesign.com/#Fun_Shareware

A tutorial can be found here:

http://home.clara.net/gmatkin/hullstut.htm

The only gripe I have with Gregg's program is that it doesn't handle curved
stems, and I like curved stems. :o( But it's hard to say anything bad about
a program that does so much for the price (free!).

On Fri, 07 Sep 2001 21:36:34 -0000, Chris wrote:
Has anyone used this program? There is a free demo available for
IBM's. Pretty fun to play with, but I haven't decided if it's worth
the 150$ price to get the functional version. With the demo, you can
play around with different designs though. Pretty cool. Just not
sure how to get them off the computer sans the 150$. Take a look
sometime....all for plywood too.

http://www.plyboats.com/
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
http://www.boat-links.com/
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.
<Mark Twain>

201 - 220 of 54719