Date   

Re: Portland to the Pacific in a dory

David Luckhardt
 

Interesting indeed!   One weird thing is that he's using Douglas oarlocks on round-sided leathers -- hence the clunk with every stroke.  I was given a set by a local rower and built up the leathers with more leather and PL Premium, and they work great with very little noise.  Not for rowing purists as  you can't easily rotate 'em for the Dory Stroke -- but like my Twin Graybeal, I'm a lazy guy....

 

https://live.staticflickr.com/7822/47073396491_12448b9ced_b.jpg


Re: Dan from Almostcanada Visits Fern Ridge

Dan
 

Thanks very much John! Jamie and I had a wonderful time. I suspect
number C-24 "White Whale" is the reason that surveillance flights seem to
have increased, here, over the Frankenwerke. I do wish I could figure a
way to purloin the most of them. F***Z*** remains a master of
gaslighting...deep sigh. Dan.


Re: Fern Ridge Charting, and Lunch Messabout? (was: Thanks John, great pix of the mudhole ----- Surprise Status)

Josh
 

May be able to make Fernridge on Thursday, what time? Richardson? Got a new tenkara rod to try at the pond. 


Lateeners

 

No info on where these boats sail (Egypt?) but, WOW!

https://flic.kr/p/oXbPXL

https://flic.kr/p/p23zEf

https://flic.kr/p/Bofp8h

https://flic.kr/p/vFQQgQ

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is wisdom in turning as often as possible from the familiar to the unfamiliar: it keeps the mind nimble, it kills prejudice, and it fosters humor. (George Santayana)


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Fern Ridge Sailboat Pix

 

Got some good shots of Mike S's 1967 Pearson Packet, Ursa Minor, last Wednesday evening, and some shots of an overloaded hotrod cat (40 knots? I don't think so <g>) and the Wm. Garden Eel from the Yacht Club:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVsND3V

--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires. (John Steinbeck)


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Re: Portland to the Pacific in a dory

Richard Green
 

Sailing that trip we always planned three days. Two was pushing it but….amazing trip.

Rich

On May 10, 2021, at 12:17 PM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Thanks, Dirt. An interesting video that brings up a couple of questions: Why do it in two days? Woulda been more fun if he took several days, or a week. And why is he rowing with his oarlocks backwards? But good for him to have gone out and done it.

On 5/10/2021 11:53 AM, Case wrote:
Saw this video and thought you’d all like it.
https://youtu.be/waoiPeysplk <https://youtu.be/waoiPeysplk>
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Steam is the friend of man. Steam engines are very human. Their very weaknesses are understandable. Steam engines do not flash back and blow your face in. They do not short-circuit and rive your heart with imponderable electric force. They have arms and legs and warm hearts and veins full of warm vapor. Give us steam every time. You know where you are with steam. (William McFee)


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Re: Portland to the Pacific in a dory

Richard Green
 

Fun to see, thanks!

Rich

On May 10, 2021, at 11:53 AM, Case Turner <casesturner@...> wrote:

Saw this video and thought you’d all like it.


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Dirt


Re: Portland to the Pacific in a dory

 

Thanks, Dirt. An interesting video that brings up a couple of questions: Why do it in two days? Woulda been more fun if he took several days, or a week. And why is he rowing with his oarlocks backwards? But good for him to have gone out and done it.

On 5/10/2021 11:53 AM, Case wrote:
Saw this video and thought you’d all like it.
https://youtu.be/waoiPeysplk <https://youtu.be/waoiPeysplk>
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Steam is the friend of man. Steam engines are very human. Their very weaknesses are understandable. Steam engines do not flash back and blow your face in. They do not short-circuit and rive your heart with imponderable electric force. They have arms and legs and warm hearts and veins full of warm vapor. Give us steam every time. You know where you are with steam. (William McFee)
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Re: Dan from Almostcanada Visits Fern Ridge

Richard Green
 

Fun pics, thanks!

Rich

On May 10, 2021, at 11:56 AM, John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

Some photos from the messabout a few weeks ago:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVA8XjV

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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going to speak it to? (Clarence Darrow)


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Re: Dan from Almostcanada Visits Fern Ridge

elaineginader
 

Great photos John such a great time.


On Mon, May 10, 2021, 11:56 AM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:
Some photos from the messabout a few weeks ago:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVA8XjV

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John <jkohnen@...>
Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going to
speak it to? (Clarence Darrow)


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Dan from Almostcanada Visits Fern Ridge

 

Some photos from the messabout a few weeks ago:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVA8XjV

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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
Even if you do learn to speak correct English, whom are you going to speak it to? (Clarence Darrow)


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Portland to the Pacific in a dory

Case Turner
 

Saw this video and thought you’d all like it.


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Dirt


Re: Fern Ridge Charting, and Lunch Messabout? (was: Thanks John, great pix of the mudhole ----- Surprise Status)

Mark Neuhaus
 

Hi Gang,

On Sun, May 9, 2021 at 10:11 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@...> wrote:

Mark N in the Megalopolis has been fooling with getting satellite photos
and Navionics charts using a Russian program, then turning them into
maps usable by raster nav programs like OpenCPN and OziExplorer (which
probably only matters to me <g>). How's that coming Mark? I hope he
comes to the Spring Messabout to tell us about the project.

The program that John is referring to is called SAS.Planet and is windows only.  It allows one to download map tiles at various zoom levels from many, many sources on the web and save them to a cache on your hard drive.   That means you can essentially have Google maps, Google satellite views, and Navionic charts onboard and in use even when not connected to the internet.  Those are the three I am playing with.  Oh, I guess I've downloaded some C-map imagery also.

The program lets you export user-selected polygons of stitched map tiles into an image file, such as JPG, which can be viewed in various graphics programs.  Because it also saves a .kml file of the image coordinates, one can run that info through a separate program called "imgkap" and end up with a geo-registered KAP file, ready for using in OpenCPN.

SAS.Planet can also be used as a chartplotter.  I've connected my handheld Garmin GPSmap78 to my laptop through a USB cable, and tracked my movements in real time, while recording that data to a file.  You can add waypoints as you go.  If Dan had this running on his visit to Gibson Island, we would all know where he was when that picture of him was taken.  :-)

I've also connected an Android device to a laptop using Bluetooth and sent the Android's GPS info over to SAS.Planet and OpenCPN.

Speaking of Android devices, there are a couple of apps that I have used for mapping.  "Backcountry Navigator" and "US Topo Maps Free" both download map tiles similar to SAS.Planet and allow you to view them offline.  You can track yourself on the map and record that track to the device.  

Now that I think about it, this sounds like what I would have talked about at our cancelled electronics workshop last year.  :-)

Yes, John, I am hoping to come down to Fern Ridge.  I am staying away from any chainsaws I hear in my neighborhood, so as not to be tempted to scrounge new woodturning stock and screw up my back again.  If I can finish slopping the paint on MoonlitTurtle, I may come overnight.  Otherwise, I will try for Saturday.

Mark
   



Fern Ridge Charting, and Lunch Messabout? (was: Thanks John, great pix of the mudhole ----- Surprise Status)

 

Mark N in the Megalopolis has been fooling with getting satellite photos and Navionics charts using a Russian program, then turning them into maps usable by raster nav programs like OpenCPN and OziExplorer (which probably only matters to me <g>). How's that coming Mark? I hope he comes to the Spring Messabout to tell us about the project.

The small-scale Navionics screenshot I uploaded to the Coots site is just an overview. I can do some larger scale shots of portions of the lake and put them there for reference. I could even calibrate them in Ozi and turn them into raster charts... But the accuracy of Navionics bathymetric data is doubtful. If they show a channel somewhere it's probably around there. Useful. If you draw four feet and Navionics shows 5 feet somewhere, go slow, watch your depth finder, and have the push pole handy. ;o)

Thursday would be a good day for another Fern Ridge lunch messabout. The traditional Coot lunch day, and if I stay late I can watch the racers in the evening. :o)

On 5/9/2021 5:47 PM, Electri-Cal wrote:
I just added that pix to my "maps" file on my phone.  Now when I'm there I will know about where I am.  I do have some books on Oregon lakes, but that one is good color, the right size to transfer and read on my phone.  Are there other maps that show the lakes so clearly, especially at the low water we have now ??
...
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John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
I don't know whether it is horse sense or horse something else, but if they like it I know where there is a whole pile of it. (L. Francis Herreshoff to an editor when told that readers liked his "horse sense")
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Depth finders for small craft

Electri-Cal
 

The easiest way I found is getting a e-Bay ice fishing depth finder.  I got mine in great condition from a guy who didn't want to freeze alone in the dark, on a cracking ice sheet anymore.  Geee! what a surprise, a Hummingbird brand, shipped from Michigan, not much use and has a case, sensor and everything.  Think I paid $50 to 60. bucks delivered --- before covid of course. 

Now I did change it to wired in, later, and I does everything I need.  The case used two 6 volt lantern batteries, some use d or c cells wired, but all are actually 12 volt,  So, you could just buy a regular one and build a 12 volt power supply, with the reading part on top, like a built in model.  I bought my H-bird, because I had one before and it worked great, depth alarm, shallow alarm, water temp on some, the stuff you need to know at a reasonable price, since it's older equipment.  

A great addition for safety, my opinion anyhow, ----  Cal           PS -------  Logs, rocks, and shallow water are really a map thing or local knowledge, sail in the deep part, row the shallows.  Earl showed me that last week end !!


Thanks John, great pix of the mudhole ----- Surprise Status

Electri-Cal
 

I just added that pix to my "maps" file on my phone.  Now when I'm there I will know about where I am.  I do have some books on Oregon lakes, but that one is good color, the right size to transfer and read on my phone.  Are there other maps that show the lakes so clearly, especially at the low water we have now ??  

The new dash is built, I have wires pretty well figured out, but I will do that after the new instruments come in, the water (like tide and tide ) wait for no coot.  I plan to be back with several good coats by wednesday, since I went for fast dry urethane this time.  I don't like it as well as the heavier helmsman, but it does go on wetter, and dries like water base as usual.  I spread each set of wires out in a fan, with the instrument still attached.  All I need to do, with holes prepared is to pop each one back in as its assembled,  This is my third dash build on one boat, so the old dash is a good start to fitting.  Easier to see layout, slightly bigger area design wise, so room for more without as much panic.

Maybe about Wed., or Thurs. I'll be ready to go  see ya, ----   Cal 


Re: Fern Ridge Depths (was: Darn Burgee Escaped over the Winter)

 

I think you may have been standing on what's left of Royal Avenue, which used to cross the lake to Elmira (and was probably named "Elmira Road" then). If so, you were taking a bath where I've driven my car in the winter, long, long ago, when the pavement hadn't all washed away and there wasn't a gate across the road. <g> There aren't any natural piles of rock in Fern Ridge, just that one big glacial erratic boulder out there somewhere. Navionics shoulda shown the old road, as it sticks up a ways from the mud. They also don't show thew low dams, 4' below full lake level, the Corps put in several years ago to retain water behind Gibson island in the winter for waterfowl. They're probably just awash now. They also show only Docks A-D at Richardson. The "new" docks A-D and the "new" E Dock. were put in years ago.

Navionics is useful on inland waters, but take what they show with a grain of salt. "trust but verify!. <g>

On 5/9/2021 7:54 AM, Dan in Almostcanada wrote:
I'm thinking them Navionics boys and girls should come swimming, down by
Gibson Island, where i took a dip last month. I was standing on a rockpile
in waist deep water. I'm guessing this map shows 11 feet at about the same
spot...but, then, I was experiencing heatstroke similar to an Eskimo in
Miami that day. There was still snow on the ground at home when I left for
FR, so in my delirium, could have guessed at my location less than
accurately(?) dan.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
The lack of a sense of history is the damnation of the modern world. (Robert Penn Warren)
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Re: Fern Ridge Depths (was: Darn Burgee Escaped over the Winter)

Dan
 

I'm thinking them Navionics boys and girls should come swimming, down by
Gibson Island, where i took a dip last month. I was standing on a rockpile
in waist deep water. I'm guessing this map shows 11 feet at about the same
spot...but, then, I was experiencing heatstroke similar to an Eskimo in
Miami that day. There was still snow on the ground at home when I left for
FR, so in my delirium, could have guessed at my location less than
accurately(?) dan.


Re: Wooden Sailboat for Coos Bay?

 

The boats are one and the same. Some of us Coots visited Ted Chism at his place just up Joe Ney Slough from the Charleston boatyard in February of 2008. I saw the drawing from the Smithsonian he used to make the plans for the boat, and we loaned him American Sailing Craft so he could read what Chapelle had to say about the boat.

https://flic.kr/p/2kXo2QL

https://flic.kr/p/2kXx4oL

https://flic.kr/p/2kXo2Mj

There weren't any offsets of construction drawing from the Smithy, just a full size version of the illustration in the book (Ted had never seen the book, he just ordered some drawings of likely sounding boats from the museum and chose the flattie). He made his own offset table by measuring the drawing, and worked out the construction from Chapelle drawings of similar boats. I think he said he was going to put skipjack-like head on the bow, and maybe he said he was going to use a gaff main. It was a long time ago... And we still haven't got the book back! ;o)

It was indeed low tide when I took the photo of the flattie on the mud. Ted knew he needed a boat that could dry out because there's not much water in Joe Ney Slough during spring low tides, or even neaps. <g>

A sharpie wouldn't be so fat, though you can't really tell much from and end-on telephoto shot. The old-time builders discovered that a fat flat-bottom boat sailed better if you gave the bottom some V aft.

On 5/8/2021 8:00 PM, Gerard M wrote:
The photo I see is of a V bottom boat ashore, probably at low tide.
The illustration (plan) from Chapelle seems to be a sharpie, with a
really flat bottom. I find both attractive, but doubt they are the
same.
Here's a boat built to dry out in one of the sloughs off Coos Bay. A
"flattie" from Chapelle's American Sailing Craft. We visited the builder
when he was still putting the bottom on, years ago... Launched in 2017.

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. (Patrick F. McManus)
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Re: Wooden Sailboat for Coos Bay?

Gerard Mittelstaedt
 

The photo I see is of a V bottom boat ashore, probably at low tide.
The illustration (plan) from Chapelle seems to be a sharpie, with a
really flat bottom. I find both attractive, but doubt they are the
same.
- Gerard Mittelstaedt
McAllen, TX

On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 11:30 PM John Kohnen <jkohnen@boat-links.com> wrote:

To illustrate:

http://www.coots.org/MapImages/Coast/CoosBay-18587.png

Here's a boat built to dry out in one of the sloughs off Coos Bay. A
"flattie" from Chapelle's American Sailing Craft. We visited the builder
when he was still putting the bottom on, years ago... Launched in 2017.

https://flic.kr/p/YC3K9C

https://flic.kr/p/YC3KdW

https://flic.kr/p/XZVhRv

On 5/3/2021 9:04 PM, I wrote:
...
But, here's an interesting topic for us to discuss: What's a good wooden
sailboat design, under 2,000 lb. for trailering ease, able to
comfortably carry two adults and two kids, for a big, shallow, windy
bay?
> ...
Most of Coos Bay turns into mud flats at low tide.
--
John <jkohnen@boat-links.com>
We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of
course, language. (Oscar Wilde)


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--
Gerard Mittelstaedt -- mittel48@gmail.com
McAllen, Texas
USA

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